Language Cognition and Deafness

Author: Michael Rodda
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 113493310X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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First published in 1987. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Psychological Development of Deaf Children

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780195115758
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This book is the first comprehensive examination of the psychological development of deaf children. Because the majority of young deaf children (especially those with non-signing parents) are reared in language-impoverished environments, their social and cognitive development may differ markedly from hearing children. The author here details those potential differences, giving special attention to how the psychological development of deaf children is affected by their interpersonal communication with parents, peers, and teachers. This careful and balanced consideration of existing evidence and research provides a new psychological perspective on deaf children and deafness while debunking a number of popular notions about the hearing impaired. In light of recent findings concerning manual communication, parent-child interactions, and intellectual and academic assessments of hearing-impaired children, the author has forged an integrated understanding of social, language, and cognitive development as they are affected by childhood deafness. Empirical evaluations of deaf children's intellectual and academic abilities are stressed throughout. The Psychological Development of Deaf Children will be of great interest to students, teachers, and researchers studying deafness and how it relates to speech and hearing; developmental, social, and cognitive psychology; social work; and medicine.

Deaf Cognition

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195368673
Format: PDF, Mobi
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'Deaf Cognition' examines the cognitive underpinnings of deaf individuals' learning. It contributes to the science of learning by describing and testing theories that might either over- or underestimate the role that audition or vision plays in learning and memory, and by shedding light on multiple pathways for learning.

Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies Language and Education

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195189131
Format: PDF
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In Plato's cratylus, which dates to 360 B.C., Socrates alludes to the use of signs by deaf people. In his Natural History, completed in 79 A.D., Pliny the Elder alludes to Quintus Pedius, the deaf son of a Roman consul, who had to seek permission from Caesar Augustus to pursue his training as an artist. During the Renaissance, scores of deaf people achieved fame throughout Europe, and by the middle of the 17th century the talents and communication systems of deaf people were being studied by a variety of noted scientists and philosophers. However, the role of deaf people in society has always been hotly debated: could they be educated? Should they be educated? If so, how? How does Deaf culture exist within larger communities? What do advances in the technology and the genetics of hearing loss portend for Deaf communities? In this landmark volume, a wide range of international experts present a comprehensive and accessible overview of the diverse field of deaf studies, language, and education. Pairing practical information with detailed analyses of what works, why, and for whom, and banishing the paternalism once intrinsic to the field, the handbook consists of specially commissioned essays on topics such as language and language development, hearing and speech perception, education, literacy, cognition, and the complex cultural, social, and psychological issues associated with individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. Through careful planning, collaboration, and editing, the various topics are interwoven in a manner that allows the reader to understand the current status of research in the field and recognize the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead, providing the most comprehensive reference resource on deaf issues. Written to be accessible to students and practitioners as well as researchers, The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies, Language, and Education is a uniquely ambitious work that will alter both theoretical and applied landscapes. It surveys a field that has grown dramatically over the past 40 years, since sign languages were first recognized by scientists to be true languages. From work on the linguistics of sign language and parent-child interactions to analyses of school placement and the mapping of brain function in deaf individuals, research across a wide range of disciplines has greatly expanded not just our knowledge of deafness and the deaf, but of the very origins of language, social interaction, and thinking. Bringing together historical information, research, and strategies for teaching and service provision, Marc Marschark and Patricia Elizabeth Spencer have given us what is certain to become the benchmark reference in the field.

Language and Deafness

Author: Peter V. Paul
Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Learning
ISBN: 9780763751043
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The Fourth Edition of Language and Deafness covers language and literacy development from preschool through adolescence. Content includes the basics of language development and the relationship between language and cognition. Oral communication methods and English-like signing systems are also covered, along with linguistics/sociolinguistics of American Sign Language. Multicultural aspects, including bilingualism and second-language learning, are covered in detail.

Raising and Educating a Deaf Child

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195376153
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A concise guide explains the current research on the development of deaf children, urges the importance of communication with deaf children by sign language as early as possible, and provides information on resources for the deaf and their parents. UP.

Advances in the Sign Language Development of Deaf Children

Author: Brenda Schick
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195180941
Format: PDF, Docs
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The authors provide cogent summaries of what is known about early gestural development, interactive processes adapted to visual communication, & the processes of semantic, syntactic, & pragmatic development in sign.

Pinky Extension and Eye Gaze

Author: Ceil Lucas
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press
ISBN: 9781563680700
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This volume's ten meticulously prepared chapters reflect the refinements of research in six major sociolinguistics areas. Rob Hoopes' work, "A Preliminary Examination of Pinky Extension: Suggestions Regarding Its Occurrence, Constraints, and Function", commences Part One: Variation with a sound explanation of this American Sign Language (ASL) phonological characteristic. Part Two: Languages in Contact includes findings by Jean Ann on contact between Taiwanese Sign Language and written Taiwanese. Priscilla Shannon Gutierrez considers the relationship of educational policy with language and cognition in deaf children in Part Three: Language in Education, and in Part Four: Discourse Analysis, Melanie Metzger discusses eye gaze and pronominal reference in ASL. Part Five: Second-Language Learning presents the single chapter "An Acculturation Model for ASL Learners", by Mike Kemp. Sarah E. Burns defines Irish Sign Language as Ireland's second minority language after Gaelic, in Part Six: Language Attitudes, the final area of concentration in this rigorously researched volume. These studies and the others by the respected scholars featured in Pinky Extension and Eye Gaze make it an outstanding and eminently valuable addition to this series.

Cognitive behavioral Therapy for Deaf and Hearing Persons with Language and Learning Challenges

Author: Neil S. Glickman
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 0805863982
Format: PDF
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This book provides a model for adapting best practices in cognitive-behavioral therapy to consumers whose language and cognitive deficits make it difficult for them to benefit from traditional talk oriented psychotherapy. The book focuses primarily upon the mental health care of those deaf clients, sometimes referred to as "low functioning" or "traditionally underserved," who are particularly difficult to engage in meaningful treatment. Drawing most heavily upon the work of Donald Meichenbaum, Marsha Linehan, and Ross Greene, this book presents adaptations and simplifications of psychotherapy which make it accessible and meaningful for persons often viewed as "poor candidates." The heart of the book is a greatly simplified approach to psychosocial skill training, especially in the domains of coping, conflict resolution and relapse prevention skills, as well as an extensive discussion of "pre-treatment" strategies for engaging clients in mental health care. Also included is research demonstrating how deaf mental health clients are different than hearing clients, guidelines for doing mental status examinations with deaf clients whose language dysfluency gives them the false appearance of having thought disorders, and a chapter on developing staff and creating culturally and clinically appropriate treatment programs. Included with the book is a CD-ROM containing over 1500 beautifully drawn illustrations of a wide range of mental health and substance abuse related concepts. These pictures or "skill cards" are used in psychoeducation and therapy with persons who can not read English.

The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies in Language

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190241411
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Language development, and the challenges it can present for individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, have long been a focus of research, theory, and practice in D/deaf studies and deaf education. Over the past 150 years, but most especially near the end of the 20th and beginning of the 21st century, advances in the acquisition and development of language competencies and skills have been increasing rapidly. This volume addresses many of those accomplishments as well as remaining challenges and new questions that have arisen from multiple perspectives: theoretical, linguistic, social-emotional, neuro-biological, and socio-cultural. Contributors comprise an international group of prominent scholars and practitioners from a variety of academic and clinical backgrounds. The result is a volume that addresses, in detail, current knowledge, emerging questions, and innovative educational practice in a variety of contexts. The volume takes on topics such as discussion of the transformation of efforts to identify a "best" language approach (the "sign" versus "speech" debate) to a stronger focus on individual strengths, potentials, and choices for selecting and even combining approaches; the effects of language on other areas of development as well as effects from other domains on language itself; and how neurological, socio-cognitive, and linguistic bases of learning are leading to more specialized approaches to instruction that address the challenges that remain for deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals. This volume both complements and extends The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, Volumes 1 and 2, going further into the unique challenges and demands for deaf or hard-of-hearing individuals than any other text and providing not only compilations of what is known but setting the course for investigating what is still to be learned.