Language Learnability and L2 Phonology

Author: J. Archibald
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401120560
Format: PDF
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In this book Archibald describes two studies conducted within a parametric framework in the area of second language acquisition. The studies are designed to investigate the acquisition of English stress patterns (via both production and perception tasks) by adult speakers of Polish and Hungarian. Archibald argues that interlanguage grammars can be understood as a mix of L1 transfer and the effects of Universal Grammar. Metrical parameters related to such things as quantity--sensitivity, extrametricality, and word--tree dominance determine the structure of the interlanguage. The author reports that the subjects are remarkably successful at acquiring English stress and do not appear to violate proposed universals of metrical phonology. This book is one of the few attempts to investigate the acquisition of L2 phonology within a UG framework. Empirical support is provided for the parametric model to an extent uncommon in most syntactic studies.

The Acquisition of Verbs and their Grammar

Author: Natalia Gagarina
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1402043341
Format: PDF, Docs
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language-specific competence within the acquisitional process. Together with the focus on acquisition of the verb and its grammar research in this domain provides a fruitful basis for discussion. The maturation model of language acquisition assumes that UG becomes the language specific grammar over time and that UG is entirely available only up until the time when the native language has been completely acquired (cf. Atkinson 1992, Wexler 1999). Constructivist models that may also be opposed to theories of UG alongside with the usage- based approaches m- tioned above mostly elaborate on the early acquisition of spatial relations (e. g. Bowerman and Choi 2001, Sinha et al. 1999); however, two main hy- theses of this approach – a holistic view of universal spatial cognition and the language specific acquisition hypothesis are beyond the main scope – of this book. The book presents original contributions based on analyses of naturalistic data from eleven languages: Croatian, Dutch, English, Estonian, French, German, Hebrew, Jakarta Indonesian, Japanese, Russian and Spanish. Three of the contributions make cross-linguistic comparisons – between English and Russian; English, German and Spanish; and German, Croatian and English. All papers in the volume investigate first language acquisition and one paper studies both first and second language acquisition.

Semantics in Acquisition

Author: Veerle van Geenhoven
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1402044852
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This volume contains writings focusing on semantic phenomena and their interpretation in the analysis of the language of a learner. The variety of phenomena that are addressed is substantial: temporal aspect and tense, specificity, quantification, scope, finiteness, focus structure, and focus particles. These phenomena are investigated is many languages. The volume creates a theoretical as well as an empirical bridge between semantic research on the one hand and psycholinguistic acquisition studies on the other.

Linguistic Theory in Second Language Acquisition

Author: S. Flynn
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781556080845
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Suzanne Flynn and Wayne O'Neil Massachusetts Institute of Technology I. INTRODUCTION The theory of Universal Grammar (UG) as explicated e. g. in Chomsky, 1986, has led to explosive developments in the study of natural language as well as to significant advances in the study of first language (L I) acquisition. Most recently. the theory of UG has led to important theore tical and empirical advances in the field of adult second language (L2) acquisition as well. The principle impetus for this development can be traced to the work in linguistics which shifted the study "from behavior or the products of behavior to states of the mind/brain that enter into behavior" (Chomksy. 1986:3). Grammars within this framework are conceived of as theoretical accounts of "the state of the mind/brain of the person who knows a particular language" (Chomsky. 1986:3). Research within fields of language acquisition seeks to isolate and specify the properties of the underlying competence necessary for language learning. Full development of a theory of UG demands study and understanding of the nature of both the formal properties of language and of the language acquisition process itself. However. while there is a tradition of debate and dialogue established between theoretical linguistics and Ll acquisition research. relatively few connections have been made between linguistic theory and L2 acquisition research.

Development of the Syntax Discourse Interface

Author: S. Avrutin
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401712395
Format: PDF, Docs
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In this book, I address several issues of child linguistic development from the perspective of the syntax -discourse interface. Traditionally, language acquisition research has focused on the development of one of the linguistic modules, e.g. acquisition of syntax, morphology or phonology. While this approach can be viewed as fruitful in some cases, there is a number of linguistic phenomena whose explanation depends on the interaction of different modules and, therefore, different domains of linguistic knowledge. A typical example is pronominal anaphora: It can be shown that to correctly use pronominal elements, normal adult speakers must possess both syntactic and pragmatic knowledge, and that these kinds of knowledge must interact with each other. With regard to the language acquisition process, such phenomena suggest a somewhat different approach to the language acquisition research. Indeed, if some experimental studies show that children make errors in the construction under investigation, it will be necessary to consider these results from the point of view of the interaction of the different domains of linguistic knowledge involved in their interpretation. In other words, if this particular construction requires the integration of, for example, syntactic and discourse-based knowledge, children's errors may, in principle, be due to their lack of the former, the latter, or both kinds of knowledge, and cannot be taken as direct evidence for the "underdeveloped" status of just one of them.

The generative study of second language acquisition

Author: Suzanne Flynn
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum
ISBN:
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The vast majority of work in theoretical linguistics from a generative perspective is based on first language acquisition and performance. The vast majority of work on second language acquisition is carried out by scholars and educators working within approaches other than that of generative linguistics. In this volume, this gap is bridged as leading generative linguists apply their intellectual and disciplinary skills to issues in second language acquisition. The results will be of interest to all those who study second language acquisition, regardless of their theoretical perspective, and all generative linguists, regardless of the topics on which they work.

Encyclopedia of Language Linguistics Sca Spe

Author: E. K. Brown
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780080443676
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Covers the major topics in all aspects of language and linguistics as well as the many different views and perspectives encountered in research and thinking in the field.

From Syntax to Discourse

Author: C. Hamann
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9781402004391
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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claim is that such morphological processes can be learnt without symbolization and innate knowledge. See Rumelhart and McClelland (1986) for the original model of past tense acquisition, Plunkett and Marchman (1993), Nakisa, Plunkett and Hahn (1996) and Elman et al. (1996) for developments and extensions to other morphological processes, and Marcus et al. (1992) and Pinker and Prince (1988) for criticism. One line of investigation supporting the view of language as a genetic endowment is closely linked to traditional research on language acquisition and argues as follows: If language is innate there must be phenomena that should be accessible from birth in one form or the other. Thus it is clear that the language of children, especially young children and preferably babies should be investigated. As babies unfortunately don't talk, the abilities that are available from birth must be established in ways different from the usual linguistic analysis. Psycholinguistic research of the last few years has shown that at the age of 4 and 8 months and even during their first week of life children already have important language skills. From the fourth day, infants distinguish their mother tongue from other languages. From the first months children prefer the sound of speech to 'other noise'. At the age of 4 months, infants prefer pauses at syntactic boundaries to random pauses.