All We Knew Was to Farm

Author: Melissa Walker
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801869242
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Melissa Walker has done an admirable job of mining oral interviews, TVA records, letters, diaries, and farming magazines to piece together the story of how women contributed to the family income... Walker deftly negotiates the intersection of race, class, and gender. -- Journal of East Tennessee History

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Author: Steve Cotham
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738543499
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
The Great Smoky Mountains National Park has some of the highest, oldest, and most picturesque mountains and ridges in the eastern United States. One of the most biologically diverse regions in North America--with thousands of species of plant and animal life--the park was designated an International Biosphere Reserve by the United Nations in 1976 and a World Heritage Site in 1983.

Weaving new worlds

Author: Sarah H. Hill
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
ISBN:
Format: PDF
Download Now
In this innovative study, Sarah Hill illuminates the history of Southeastern Cherokee women by examining changes in their basketry. Based in tradition and made from locally gathered materials, baskets evoke the lives and landscapes of their makers. Indeed, as Weaving New Worldsreveals, the stories of Cherokee baskets and the women who weave them are intertwined and inseparable. Incorporating written, woven, and spoken records, Hill demonstrates that changes in Cherokee basketry signal important transformations in Cherokee culture. Over the course of three centuries, Cherokees developed four major basketry traditions, each based on a different material--rivercane, white oak, honeysuckle, and maple. Hill explores how the addition of each new material occurred in the context of lived experience, ecological processes, social conditions, economic circumstances, and historical eras. Incorporating insights from written sources, interviews with contemporary Cherokee weavers, and a close examination of the baskets themselves, she presents Cherokee women as shapers and subjects of change. Even in the face of cultural assault and environmental loss, she argues, Cherokee women have continued to take what they have to make what they need, literally and metaphorically weaving new worlds from old.

Great Smoky Mountains folklife

Author: Michael Ann Williams
Publisher: Univ Pr of Mississippi
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
A comprehensive look at the traditional culture in a distinct region of Appalachia.

Lost Elkmont

Author: Daniel L. Paulin
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1467113824
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Prior to the formation of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) in 1934, the small community of Elkmont was established as a logging camp by Col. Wilson B. Townsend's Little River Lumber Company around 1908. This was after he purchased 86,000 acres of mostly virgin forest. The area that was previously inhabited by various American Indian groups, and later by European-American settlers beginning around 1830, was to become for a time the second largest town in Sevier County, Tennessee. Colonel Townsend's business ventures proved successful beyond expectation, as he skillfully exploited the area's valuable hardwood forests. His logging company and railroad provided a mountain population with jobs and steady wages. Once all the valuable timber was harvested, Townsend sold land to private citizens who established what was to become an exclusive summer community that included both the Appalachian and Wonderland Clubs. These coexisted inside the GSMNP until 1992. This is the story of Elkmont.