Latent Variable Modeling Using R

Author: A. Alexander Beaujean
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317970721
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This step-by-step guide is written for R and latent variable model (LVM) novices. Utilizing a path model approach and focusing on the lavaan package, this book is designed to help readers quickly understand LVMs and their analysis in R. The author reviews the reasoning behind the syntax selected and provides examples that demonstrate how to analyze data for a variety of LVMs. Featuring examples applicable to psychology, education, business, and other social and health sciences, minimal text is devoted to theoretical underpinnings. The material is presented without the use of matrix algebra. As a whole the book prepares readers to write about and interpret LVM results they obtain in R. Each chapter features background information, boldfaced key terms defined in the glossary, detailed interpretations of R output, descriptions of how to write the analysis of results for publication, a summary, R based practice exercises (with solutions included in the back of the book), and references and related readings. Margin notes help readers better understand LVMs and write their own R syntax. Examples using data from published work across a variety of disciplines demonstrate how to use R syntax for analyzing and interpreting results. R functions, syntax, and the corresponding results appear in gray boxes to help readers quickly locate this material. A unique index helps readers quickly locate R functions, packages, and datasets. The book and accompanying website at http://blogs.baylor.edu/rlatentvariable/ provides all of the data for the book’s examples and exercises as well as R syntax so readers can replicate the analyses. The book reviews how to enter the data into R, specify the LVMs, and obtain and interpret the estimated parameter values. The book opens with the fundamentals of using R including how to download the program, use functions, and enter and manipulate data. Chapters 2 and 3 introduce and then extend path models to include latent variables. Chapter 4 shows readers how to analyze a latent variable model with data from more than one group, while Chapter 5 shows how to analyze a latent variable model with data from more than one time period. Chapter 6 demonstrates the analysis of dichotomous variables, while Chapter 7 demonstrates how to analyze LVMs with missing data. Chapter 8 focuses on sample size determination using Monte Carlo methods, which can be used with a wide range of statistical models and account for missing data. The final chapter examines hierarchical LVMs, demonstrating both higher-order and bi-factor approaches. The book concludes with three Appendices: a review of common measures of model fit including their formulae and interpretation; syntax for other R latent variable models packages; and solutions for each chapter’s exercises. Intended as a supplementary text for graduate and/or advanced undergraduate courses on latent variable modeling, factor analysis, structural equation modeling, item response theory, measurement, or multivariate statistics taught in psychology, education, human development, business, economics, and social and health sciences, this book also appeals to researchers in these fields. Prerequisites include familiarity with basic statistical concepts, but knowledge of R is not assumed.

Latent Variable Modeling Using R

Author: A. Alexander Beaujean
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131797073X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
This step-by-step guide is written for R and latent variable model (LVM) novices. Utilizing a path model approach and focusing on the lavaan package, this book is designed to help readers quickly understand LVMs and their analysis in R. The author reviews the reasoning behind the syntax selected and provides examples that demonstrate how to analyze data for a variety of LVMs. Featuring examples applicable to psychology, education, business, and other social and health sciences, minimal text is devoted to theoretical underpinnings. The material is presented without the use of matrix algebra. As a whole the book prepares readers to write about and interpret LVM results they obtain in R. Each chapter features background information, boldfaced key terms defined in the glossary, detailed interpretations of R output, descriptions of how to write the analysis of results for publication, a summary, R based practice exercises (with solutions included in the back of the book), and references and related readings. Margin notes help readers better understand LVMs and write their own R syntax. Examples using data from published work across a variety of disciplines demonstrate how to use R syntax for analyzing and interpreting results. R functions, syntax, and the corresponding results appear in gray boxes to help readers quickly locate this material. A unique index helps readers quickly locate R functions, packages, and datasets. The book and accompanying website at http://blogs.baylor.edu/rlatentvariable/ provides all of the data for the book’s examples and exercises as well as R syntax so readers can replicate the analyses. The book reviews how to enter the data into R, specify the LVMs, and obtain and interpret the estimated parameter values. The book opens with the fundamentals of using R including how to download the program, use functions, and enter and manipulate data. Chapters 2 and 3 introduce and then extend path models to include latent variables. Chapter 4 shows readers how to analyze a latent variable model with data from more than one group, while Chapter 5 shows how to analyze a latent variable model with data from more than one time period. Chapter 6 demonstrates the analysis of dichotomous variables, while Chapter 7 demonstrates how to analyze LVMs with missing data. Chapter 8 focuses on sample size determination using Monte Carlo methods, which can be used with a wide range of statistical models and account for missing data. The final chapter examines hierarchical LVMs, demonstrating both higher-order and bi-factor approaches. The book concludes with three Appendices: a review of common measures of model fit including their formulae and interpretation; syntax for other R latent variable models packages; and solutions for each chapter’s exercises. Intended as a supplementary text for graduate and/or advanced undergraduate courses on latent variable modeling, factor analysis, structural equation modeling, item response theory, measurement, or multivariate statistics taught in psychology, education, human development, business, economics, and social and health sciences, this book also appeals to researchers in these fields. Prerequisites include familiarity with basic statistical concepts, but knowledge of R is not assumed.

Latent Variable Modeling Using R

Author: A. Alexander Beaujean
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781848726987
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
This step-by-step guide is written for R and latent variable model (LVM) novices. Utilizing a path model approach and focusing on the lavaan package, this book is designed to help readers quickly understand LVMs and their analysis in R. The author reviews the reasoning behind the syntax selected and provides examples that demonstrate how to analyze data for a variety of LVMs. Featuring examples applicable to psychology, education, business, and other social and health sciences, minimal text is devoted to theoretical underpinnings. The material is presented without the use of matrix algebra. As a whole the book prepares readers to write about and interpret LVM results they obtain in R. Each chapter features background information, boldfaced key terms defined in the glossary, detailed interpretations of R output, descriptions of how to write the analysis of results for publication, a summary, R based practice exercises (with solutions included in the back of the book), and references and related readings. Margin notes help readers better understand LVMs and write their own R syntax. Examples using data from published work across a variety of disciplines demonstrate how to use R syntax for analyzing and interpreting results. R functions, syntax, and the corresponding results appear in gray boxes to help readers quickly locate this material. A unique index helps readers quickly locate R functions, packages, and datasets. The book and accompanying website at http://blogs.baylor.edu/rlatentvariable/ provides all of the data for the book's examples and exercises as well as R syntax so readers can replicate the analyses. The book reviews how to enter the data into R, specify the LVMs, and obtain and interpret the estimated parameter values. The book opens with the fundamentals of using R including how to download the program, use functions, and enter and manipulate data. Chapters 2 and 3 introduce and then extend path models to include latent variables. Chapter 4 shows readers how to analyze a latent variable model with data from more than one group, while Chapter 5 shows how to analyze a latent variable model with data from more than one time period. Chapter 6 demonstrates the analysis of dichotomous variables, while Chapter 7 demonstrates how to analyze LVMs with missing data. Chapter 8 focuses on sample size determination using Monte Carlo methods, which can be used with a wide range of statistical models and account for missing data. The final chapter examines hierarchical LVMs, demonstrating both higher-order and bi-factor approaches. The book concludes with three Appendices: a review of common measures of model fit including their formulae and interpretation; syntax for other R latent variable models packages; and solutions for each chapter's exercises. Intended as a supplementary text for graduate and/or advanced undergraduate courses on latent variable modeling, factor analysis, structural equation modeling, item response theory, measurement, or multivariate statistics taught in psychology, education, human development, business, economics, and social and health sciences, this book also appeals to researchers in these fields. Prerequisites include familiarity with basic statistical concepts, but knowledge of R is not assumed.

Generalized Latent Variable Modeling

Author: Anders Skrondal
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 9780203489437
Format: PDF, Docs
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This book unifies and extends latent variable models, including multilevel or generalized linear mixed models, longitudinal or panel models, item response or factor models, latent class or finite mixture models, and structural equation models. Following a gentle introduction to latent variable modeling, the authors clearly explain and contrast a wide range of estimation and prediction methods from biostatistics, psychometrics, econometrics, and statistics. They present exciting and realistic applications that demonstrate how researchers can use latent variable modeling to solve concrete problems in areas as diverse as medicine, economics, and psychology. The examples considered include many nonstandard response types, such as ordinal, nominal, count, and survival data. Joint modeling of mixed responses, such as survival and longitudinal data, is also illustrated. Numerous displays, figures, and graphs make the text vivid and easy to read. About the authors: Anders Skrondal is Professor and Chair in Social Statistics, Department of Statistics, London School of Economics, UK Sophia Rabe-Hesketh is a Professor of Educational Statistics at the Graduate School of Education and Graduate Group in Biostatistics, University of California, Berkeley, USA.

Latent Variable Modeling with R

Author: W. Holmes Finch
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317970756
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book demonstrates how to conduct latent variable modeling (LVM) in R by highlighting the features of each model, their specialized uses, examples, sample code and output, and an interpretation of the results. Each chapter features a detailed example including the analysis of the data using R, the relevant theory, the assumptions underlying the model, and other statistical details to help readers better understand the models and interpret the results. Every R command necessary for conducting the analyses is described along with the resulting output which provides readers with a template to follow when they apply the methods to their own data. The basic information pertinent to each model, the newest developments in these areas, and the relevant R code to use them are reviewed. Each chapter also features an introduction, summary, and suggested readings. A glossary of the text’s boldfaced key terms and key R commands serve as helpful resources. The book is accompanied by a website with exercises, an answer key, and the in-text example data sets. Latent Variable Modeling with R: -Provides some examples that use messy data providing a more realistic situation readers will encounter with their own data. -Reviews a wide range of LVMs including factor analysis, structural equation modeling, item response theory, and mixture models and advanced topics such as fitting nonlinear structural equation models, nonparametric item response theory models, and mixture regression models. -Demonstrates how data simulation can help researchers better understand statistical methods and assist in selecting the necessary sample size prior to collecting data. -www.routledge.com/9780415832458 provides exercises that apply the models along with annotated R output answer keys and the data that corresponds to the in-text examples so readers can replicate the results and check their work. The book opens with basic instructions in how to use R to read data, download functions, and conduct basic analyses. From there, each chapter is dedicated to a different latent variable model including exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), structural equation modeling (SEM), multiple groups CFA/SEM, least squares estimation, growth curve models, mixture models, item response theory (both dichotomous and polytomous items), differential item functioning (DIF), and correspondance analysis. The book concludes with a discussion of how data simulation can be used to better understand the workings of a statistical method and assist researchers in deciding on the necessary sample size prior to collecting data. A mixture of independently developed R code along with available libraries for simulating latent models in R are provided so readers can use these simulations to analyze data using the methods introduced in the previous chapters. Intended for use in graduate or advanced undergraduate courses in latent variable modeling, factor analysis, structural equation modeling, item response theory, measurement, or multivariate statistics taught in psychology, education, human development, and social and health sciences, researchers in these fields also appreciate this book’s practical approach. The book provides sufficient conceptual background information to serve as a standalone text. Familiarity with basic statistical concepts is assumed but basic knowledge of R is not.

Latent Variable Modeling Using R

Author: A. Alexander Beaujean
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131797073X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
This step-by-step guide is written for R and latent variable model (LVM) novices. Utilizing a path model approach and focusing on the lavaan package, this book is designed to help readers quickly understand LVMs and their analysis in R. The author reviews the reasoning behind the syntax selected and provides examples that demonstrate how to analyze data for a variety of LVMs. Featuring examples applicable to psychology, education, business, and other social and health sciences, minimal text is devoted to theoretical underpinnings. The material is presented without the use of matrix algebra. As a whole the book prepares readers to write about and interpret LVM results they obtain in R. Each chapter features background information, boldfaced key terms defined in the glossary, detailed interpretations of R output, descriptions of how to write the analysis of results for publication, a summary, R based practice exercises (with solutions included in the back of the book), and references and related readings. Margin notes help readers better understand LVMs and write their own R syntax. Examples using data from published work across a variety of disciplines demonstrate how to use R syntax for analyzing and interpreting results. R functions, syntax, and the corresponding results appear in gray boxes to help readers quickly locate this material. A unique index helps readers quickly locate R functions, packages, and datasets. The book and accompanying website at http://blogs.baylor.edu/rlatentvariable/ provides all of the data for the book’s examples and exercises as well as R syntax so readers can replicate the analyses. The book reviews how to enter the data into R, specify the LVMs, and obtain and interpret the estimated parameter values. The book opens with the fundamentals of using R including how to download the program, use functions, and enter and manipulate data. Chapters 2 and 3 introduce and then extend path models to include latent variables. Chapter 4 shows readers how to analyze a latent variable model with data from more than one group, while Chapter 5 shows how to analyze a latent variable model with data from more than one time period. Chapter 6 demonstrates the analysis of dichotomous variables, while Chapter 7 demonstrates how to analyze LVMs with missing data. Chapter 8 focuses on sample size determination using Monte Carlo methods, which can be used with a wide range of statistical models and account for missing data. The final chapter examines hierarchical LVMs, demonstrating both higher-order and bi-factor approaches. The book concludes with three Appendices: a review of common measures of model fit including their formulae and interpretation; syntax for other R latent variable models packages; and solutions for each chapter’s exercises. Intended as a supplementary text for graduate and/or advanced undergraduate courses on latent variable modeling, factor analysis, structural equation modeling, item response theory, measurement, or multivariate statistics taught in psychology, education, human development, business, economics, and social and health sciences, this book also appeals to researchers in these fields. Prerequisites include familiarity with basic statistical concepts, but knowledge of R is not assumed.

Using Mplus for Structural Equation Modeling

Author: E. Kevin Kelloway
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1483324893
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Ideal for researchers and graduate students in the social sciences who require knowledge of structural equation modeling techniques to answer substantive research questions, Using Mplus for Structural Equation Modeling provides a reader-friendly introduction to the major types of structural equation models implemented in the Mplus framework. This practical book, which updates author E. Kevin Kelloway’s 1998 book Using LISREL for Structural Equation Modeling, retains the successful five-step process employed in the earlier book, with a thorough update for use in the Mplus environment. Kelloway provides an overview of structural equation modeling techniques in Mplus, including the estimation of confirmatory factor analysis and observed variable path analysis. He also covers multilevel modeling for hypothesis testing in real life settings and offers an introduction to the extended capabilities of Mplus, such as exploratory structural equation modeling and estimation and testing of mediated relationships. A sample application with the source code, printout, and results is presented for each type of analysis. ”An excellent book on the ins and outs of using Mplus, as well as the practice of structural equation modeling in applied research.” —Kevin J. Grimm, University of California, Davis

The Essence of Multivariate Thinking

Author: Lisa L. Harlow
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317859790
Format: PDF, Mobi
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By focusing on underlying themes, this book helps readers better understand the connections between multivariate methods. For each method the author highlights: the similarities and differences between the methods, when they are used and the questions they address, the key assumptions and equations, and how to interpret the results. The concepts take center stage while formulas are kept to a minimum. Examples using the same data set give readers continuity so they can more easily apply the concepts. Each method is also accompanied by a worked out example, SPSS and SAS input, and an example of how to write up the results. EQS code is used for the book’s SEM applications. This extensively revised edition features: New SEM chapters including an introduction (ch.10), path analysis (ch.11), confirmatory factor analysis (ch.12), and latent variable modeling (ch.13) the last three with an EQS application. A new chapter on multilevel modeling (ch. 8) that is now used more frequently in the social sciences. More emphasis on significance tests, effect sizes, and confidence intervals to encourage readers to adopt a thorough approach to assessing the magnitude of their findings. A new data set that explores the work environment. More discussion about the basic assumptions and equations for each method for a more accessible approach. New examples that help clarify the distinctions between methods. A new website at https://sites.google.com/site/multivariatesecondedition/ that features the datasets for all of the examples in the book for use in both SPSS and SAS and in EQS for the SEM chapters. The first two chapters review the core themes that run through most multivariate methods. The author shows how understanding multivariate methods is much more achievable when we notice the themes that underlie these statistical techniques. This multiple level approach also provides greater reliability and validity in our research. After providing insight into the core themes, the author illustrates them as they apply to the most popular multivariate methods used in the social, and behavioral sciences. First, two intermediate methods are explored – multiple regression and analysis of covariance. Next the multivariate grouping variable methods of multivariate analysis of variance, discriminant function analysis, and logistic regression are explored. Next the themes are applied to multivariate modeling methods including multilevel modeling, path analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and latent variable models that include exploratory structural methods of principal component and factor analysis. The book concludes with a summary of the common themes and how they pertain to each method discussed in this book. Intended for advanced undergraduate and/or graduate courses in multivariate statistics taught in psychology, education, human development, business, nursing, and other social and life sciences, researchers also appreciate this book‘s applied approach. Knowledge of basic statistics, research methods, basic algebra, and finite mathematics is recommended.

Introducing LISREL

Author: Adamantios Diamantopoulos
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1446276252
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Introducing Lisrel provides a comprehensive introduction to Lisrel for structural equation modeling using a non-technical, user-friendly approach. It shows the major steps associated with the formulation and testing of a model.

A Beginner s Guide to Structural Equation Modeling

Author: Randall E. Schumacker
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317608097
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Noted for its crystal clear explanations, this book is considered the most comprehensive introductory text to structural equation modeling (SEM). Noted for its thorough review of basic concepts and a wide variety of models, this book better prepares readers to apply SEM to a variety of research questions. Programming details and the use of algebra are kept to a minimum to help readers easily grasp the concepts so they can conduct their own analysis and critique related research. Featuring a greater emphasis on statistical power and model validation than other texts, each chapter features key concepts, examples from various disciplines, tables and figures, a summary, and exercises. Highlights of the extensively revised 4th edition include: -Uses different SEM software (not just Lisrel) including Amos, EQS, LISREL, Mplus, and R to demonstrate applications. -Detailed introduction to the statistical methods related to SEM including correlation, regression, and factor analysis to maximize understanding (Chs. 1 – 6). -The 5 step approach to modeling data (specification, identification, estimation, testing, and modification) is now covered in more detail and prior to the modeling chapters to provide a more coherent view of how to create models and interpret results (ch. 7). -More discussion of hypothesis testing, power, sampling, effect sizes, and model fit, critical topics for beginning modelers (ch. 7). - Each model chapter now focuses on one technique to enhance understanding by providing more description, assumptions, and interpretation of results, and an exercise related to analysis and output (Chs. 8 -15). -The use of SPSS AMOS diagrams to describe the theoretical models. -The key features of each of the software packages (Ch. 1). -Guidelines for reporting SEM research (Ch. 16). -www.routledge.com/9781138811935 which provides access to data sets that can be used with any program, links to other SEM examples, related readings, and journal articles, and more. Reorganized, the new edition begins with a more detailed introduction to SEM including the various software packages available, followed by chapters on data entry and editing, and correlation which is critical to understanding how missing data, non-normality, measurement, and restriction of range in scores affects SEM analysis. Multiple regression, path, and factor models are then reviewed and exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis is introduced. These chapters demonstrate how observed variables share variance in defining a latent variables and introduce how measurement error can be removed from observed variables. Chapter 7 details the 5 SEM modeling steps including model specification, identification, estimation, testing, and modification along with a discussion of hypothesis testing and the related issues of power, and sample and effect sizes.Chapters 8 to 15 provide comprehensive introductions to different SEM models including Multiple Group, Second-Order CFA, Dynamic Factor, Multiple-Indicator Multiple-Cause, Mixed Variable and Mixture, Multi-Level, Latent Growth, and SEM Interaction Models. Each of the 5 SEM modeling steps is explained for each model along with an application. Chapter exercises provide practice with and enhance understanding of the analysis of each model. The book concludes with a review of SEM guidelines for reporting research. Designed for introductory graduate courses in structural equation modeling, factor analysis, advanced, multivariate, or applied statistics, quantitative techniques, or statistics II taught in psychology, education, business, and the social and healthcare sciences, this practical book also appeals to researchers in these disciplines. Prerequisites include an introduction to intermediate statistics that covers correlation and regression principles.