Latent Variable Modeling Using R

Author: A. Alexander Beaujean
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317970721
Format: PDF, ePub
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This step-by-step guide is written for R and latent variable model (LVM) novices. Utilizing a path model approach and focusing on the lavaan package, this book is designed to help readers quickly understand LVMs and their analysis in R. The author reviews the reasoning behind the syntax selected and provides examples that demonstrate how to analyze data for a variety of LVMs. Featuring examples applicable to psychology, education, business, and other social and health sciences, minimal text is devoted to theoretical underpinnings. The material is presented without the use of matrix algebra. As a whole the book prepares readers to write about and interpret LVM results they obtain in R. Each chapter features background information, boldfaced key terms defined in the glossary, detailed interpretations of R output, descriptions of how to write the analysis of results for publication, a summary, R based practice exercises (with solutions included in the back of the book), and references and related readings. Margin notes help readers better understand LVMs and write their own R syntax. Examples using data from published work across a variety of disciplines demonstrate how to use R syntax for analyzing and interpreting results. R functions, syntax, and the corresponding results appear in gray boxes to help readers quickly locate this material. A unique index helps readers quickly locate R functions, packages, and datasets. The book and accompanying website at http://blogs.baylor.edu/rlatentvariable/ provides all of the data for the book’s examples and exercises as well as R syntax so readers can replicate the analyses. The book reviews how to enter the data into R, specify the LVMs, and obtain and interpret the estimated parameter values. The book opens with the fundamentals of using R including how to download the program, use functions, and enter and manipulate data. Chapters 2 and 3 introduce and then extend path models to include latent variables. Chapter 4 shows readers how to analyze a latent variable model with data from more than one group, while Chapter 5 shows how to analyze a latent variable model with data from more than one time period. Chapter 6 demonstrates the analysis of dichotomous variables, while Chapter 7 demonstrates how to analyze LVMs with missing data. Chapter 8 focuses on sample size determination using Monte Carlo methods, which can be used with a wide range of statistical models and account for missing data. The final chapter examines hierarchical LVMs, demonstrating both higher-order and bi-factor approaches. The book concludes with three Appendices: a review of common measures of model fit including their formulae and interpretation; syntax for other R latent variable models packages; and solutions for each chapter’s exercises. Intended as a supplementary text for graduate and/or advanced undergraduate courses on latent variable modeling, factor analysis, structural equation modeling, item response theory, measurement, or multivariate statistics taught in psychology, education, human development, business, economics, and social and health sciences, this book also appeals to researchers in these fields. Prerequisites include familiarity with basic statistical concepts, but knowledge of R is not assumed.

Latent Variable Modeling Using R

Author: A. Alexander Beaujean
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131797073X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This step-by-step guide is written for R and latent variable model (LVM) novices. Utilizing a path model approach and focusing on the lavaan package, this book is designed to help readers quickly understand LVMs and their analysis in R. The author reviews the reasoning behind the syntax selected and provides examples that demonstrate how to analyze data for a variety of LVMs. Featuring examples applicable to psychology, education, business, and other social and health sciences, minimal text is devoted to theoretical underpinnings. The material is presented without the use of matrix algebra. As a whole the book prepares readers to write about and interpret LVM results they obtain in R. Each chapter features background information, boldfaced key terms defined in the glossary, detailed interpretations of R output, descriptions of how to write the analysis of results for publication, a summary, R based practice exercises (with solutions included in the back of the book), and references and related readings. Margin notes help readers better understand LVMs and write their own R syntax. Examples using data from published work across a variety of disciplines demonstrate how to use R syntax for analyzing and interpreting results. R functions, syntax, and the corresponding results appear in gray boxes to help readers quickly locate this material. A unique index helps readers quickly locate R functions, packages, and datasets. The book and accompanying website at http://blogs.baylor.edu/rlatentvariable/ provides all of the data for the book’s examples and exercises as well as R syntax so readers can replicate the analyses. The book reviews how to enter the data into R, specify the LVMs, and obtain and interpret the estimated parameter values. The book opens with the fundamentals of using R including how to download the program, use functions, and enter and manipulate data. Chapters 2 and 3 introduce and then extend path models to include latent variables. Chapter 4 shows readers how to analyze a latent variable model with data from more than one group, while Chapter 5 shows how to analyze a latent variable model with data from more than one time period. Chapter 6 demonstrates the analysis of dichotomous variables, while Chapter 7 demonstrates how to analyze LVMs with missing data. Chapter 8 focuses on sample size determination using Monte Carlo methods, which can be used with a wide range of statistical models and account for missing data. The final chapter examines hierarchical LVMs, demonstrating both higher-order and bi-factor approaches. The book concludes with three Appendices: a review of common measures of model fit including their formulae and interpretation; syntax for other R latent variable models packages; and solutions for each chapter’s exercises. Intended as a supplementary text for graduate and/or advanced undergraduate courses on latent variable modeling, factor analysis, structural equation modeling, item response theory, measurement, or multivariate statistics taught in psychology, education, human development, business, economics, and social and health sciences, this book also appeals to researchers in these fields. Prerequisites include familiarity with basic statistical concepts, but knowledge of R is not assumed.

Latent Variable Modeling Using R

Author: A. Alexander Beaujean
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781848726987
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
This step-by-step guide is written for R and latent variable model (LVM) novices. Utilizing a path model approach and focusing on the lavaan package, this book is designed to help readers quickly understand LVMs and their analysis in R. The author reviews the reasoning behind the syntax selected and provides examples that demonstrate how to analyze data for a variety of LVMs. Featuring examples applicable to psychology, education, business, and other social and health sciences, minimal text is devoted to theoretical underpinnings. The material is presented without the use of matrix algebra. As a whole the book prepares readers to write about and interpret LVM results they obtain in R. Each chapter features background information, boldfaced key terms defined in the glossary, detailed interpretations of R output, descriptions of how to write the analysis of results for publication, a summary, R based practice exercises (with solutions included in the back of the book), and references and related readings. Margin notes help readers better understand LVMs and write their own R syntax. Examples using data from published work across a variety of disciplines demonstrate how to use R syntax for analyzing and interpreting results. R functions, syntax, and the corresponding results appear in gray boxes to help readers quickly locate this material. A unique index helps readers quickly locate R functions, packages, and datasets. The book and accompanying website at http://blogs.baylor.edu/rlatentvariable/ provides all of the data for the book's examples and exercises as well as R syntax so readers can replicate the analyses. The book reviews how to enter the data into R, specify the LVMs, and obtain and interpret the estimated parameter values. The book opens with the fundamentals of using R including how to download the program, use functions, and enter and manipulate data. Chapters 2 and 3 introduce and then extend path models to include latent variables. Chapter 4 shows readers how to analyze a latent variable model with data from more than one group, while Chapter 5 shows how to analyze a latent variable model with data from more than one time period. Chapter 6 demonstrates the analysis of dichotomous variables, while Chapter 7 demonstrates how to analyze LVMs with missing data. Chapter 8 focuses on sample size determination using Monte Carlo methods, which can be used with a wide range of statistical models and account for missing data. The final chapter examines hierarchical LVMs, demonstrating both higher-order and bi-factor approaches. The book concludes with three Appendices: a review of common measures of model fit including their formulae and interpretation; syntax for other R latent variable models packages; and solutions for each chapter's exercises. Intended as a supplementary text for graduate and/or advanced undergraduate courses on latent variable modeling, factor analysis, structural equation modeling, item response theory, measurement, or multivariate statistics taught in psychology, education, human development, business, economics, and social and health sciences, this book also appeals to researchers in these fields. Prerequisites include familiarity with basic statistical concepts, but knowledge of R is not assumed.

Generalized Latent Variable Modeling

Author: Anders Skrondal
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 9780203489437
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book unifies and extends latent variable models, including multilevel or generalized linear mixed models, longitudinal or panel models, item response or factor models, latent class or finite mixture models, and structural equation models. Following a gentle introduction to latent variable modeling, the authors clearly explain and contrast a wide range of estimation and prediction methods from biostatistics, psychometrics, econometrics, and statistics. They present exciting and realistic applications that demonstrate how researchers can use latent variable modeling to solve concrete problems in areas as diverse as medicine, economics, and psychology. The examples considered include many nonstandard response types, such as ordinal, nominal, count, and survival data. Joint modeling of mixed responses, such as survival and longitudinal data, is also illustrated. Numerous displays, figures, and graphs make the text vivid and easy to read. About the authors: Anders Skrondal is Professor and Chair in Social Statistics, Department of Statistics, London School of Economics, UK Sophia Rabe-Hesketh is a Professor of Educational Statistics at the Graduate School of Education and Graduate Group in Biostatistics, University of California, Berkeley, USA.

Latent Variable Modeling with R

Author: W. Holmes Finch
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317970756
Format: PDF, Docs
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This book demonstrates how to conduct latent variable modeling (LVM) in R by highlighting the features of each model, their specialized uses, examples, sample code and output, and an interpretation of the results. Each chapter features a detailed example including the analysis of the data using R, the relevant theory, the assumptions underlying the model, and other statistical details to help readers better understand the models and interpret the results. Every R command necessary for conducting the analyses is described along with the resulting output which provides readers with a template to follow when they apply the methods to their own data. The basic information pertinent to each model, the newest developments in these areas, and the relevant R code to use them are reviewed. Each chapter also features an introduction, summary, and suggested readings. A glossary of the text’s boldfaced key terms and key R commands serve as helpful resources. The book is accompanied by a website with exercises, an answer key, and the in-text example data sets. Latent Variable Modeling with R: -Provides some examples that use messy data providing a more realistic situation readers will encounter with their own data. -Reviews a wide range of LVMs including factor analysis, structural equation modeling, item response theory, and mixture models and advanced topics such as fitting nonlinear structural equation models, nonparametric item response theory models, and mixture regression models. -Demonstrates how data simulation can help researchers better understand statistical methods and assist in selecting the necessary sample size prior to collecting data. -www.routledge.com/9780415832458 provides exercises that apply the models along with annotated R output answer keys and the data that corresponds to the in-text examples so readers can replicate the results and check their work. The book opens with basic instructions in how to use R to read data, download functions, and conduct basic analyses. From there, each chapter is dedicated to a different latent variable model including exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), structural equation modeling (SEM), multiple groups CFA/SEM, least squares estimation, growth curve models, mixture models, item response theory (both dichotomous and polytomous items), differential item functioning (DIF), and correspondance analysis. The book concludes with a discussion of how data simulation can be used to better understand the workings of a statistical method and assist researchers in deciding on the necessary sample size prior to collecting data. A mixture of independently developed R code along with available libraries for simulating latent models in R are provided so readers can use these simulations to analyze data using the methods introduced in the previous chapters. Intended for use in graduate or advanced undergraduate courses in latent variable modeling, factor analysis, structural equation modeling, item response theory, measurement, or multivariate statistics taught in psychology, education, human development, and social and health sciences, researchers in these fields also appreciate this book’s practical approach. The book provides sufficient conceptual background information to serve as a standalone text. Familiarity with basic statistical concepts is assumed but basic knowledge of R is not.

Latent Variable Models

Author: John C. Loehlin
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 131728528X
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Latent Variable Models: An Introduction to Factor, Path, and Structural Equation Analysis introduces latent variable models by utilizing path diagrams to explain the relationships in the models. This approach helps less mathematically-inclined readers to grasp the underlying relations among path analysis, factor analysis, and structural equation modeling, and to set up and carry out such analyses. This revised and expanded fifth edition again contains key chapters on path analysis, structural equation models, and exploratory factor analysis. In addition, it contains new material on composite reliability, models with categorical data, the minimum average partial procedure, bi-factor models, and communicating about latent variable models. The informal writing style and the numerous illustrative examples make the book accessible to readers of varying backgrounds. Notes at the end of each chapter expand the discussion and provide additional technical detail and references. Moreover, most chapters contain an extended example in which the authors work through one of the chapter’s examples in detail to aid readers in conducting similar analyses with their own data. The book and accompanying website provide all of the data for the book’s examples as well as syntax from latent variable programs so readers can replicate the analyses. The book can be used with any of a variety of computer programs, but special attention is paid to LISREL and R. An important resource for advanced students and researchers in numerous disciplines in the behavioral sciences, education, business, and health sciences, Latent Variable Models is a practical and readable reference for those seeking to understand or conduct an analysis using latent variables.

Structural Equation Modeling and Natural Systems

Author: James B. Grace
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139457845
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book, first published in 2006, presents an introduction to the methodology of structural equation modeling, illustrates its use, and goes on to argue that it has revolutionary implications for the study of natural systems. A major theme of this book is that we have, up to this point, attempted to study systems primarily using methods (such as the univariate model) that were designed only for considering individual processes. Understanding systems requires the capacity to examine simultaneous influences and responses. Structural equation modeling (SEM) has such capabilities. It also possesses many other traits that add strength to its utility as a means of making scientific progress. In light of the capabilities of SEM, it can be argued that much of ecological theory is currently locked in an immature state that impairs its relevance. It is further argued that the principles of SEM are capable of leading to the development and evaluation of multivariate theories of the sort vitally needed for the conservation of natural systems.

Learning R

Author: Richard Cotton
Publisher: "O'Reilly Media, Inc."
ISBN: 1449357180
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Learn how to perform data analysis with the R language and software environment, even if you have little or no programming experience. With the tutorials in this hands-on guide, you’ll learn how to use the essential R tools you need to know to analyze data, including data types and programming concepts. The second half of Learning R shows you real data analysis in action by covering everything from importing data to publishing your results. Each chapter in the book includes a quiz on what you’ve learned, and concludes with exercises, most of which involve writing R code. Write a simple R program, and discover what the language can do Use data types such as vectors, arrays, lists, data frames, and strings Execute code conditionally or repeatedly with branches and loops Apply R add-on packages, and package your own work for others Learn how to clean data you import from a variety of sources Understand data through visualization and summary statistics Use statistical models to pass quantitative judgments about data and make predictions Learn what to do when things go wrong while writing data analysis code

Multilevel Modeling Using R

Author: W. Holmes Finch
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 1466515864
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A powerful tool for analyzing nested designs in a variety of fields, multilevel/hierarchical modeling allows researchers to account for data collected at multiple levels. Multilevel Modeling Using R provides you with a helpful guide to conducting multilevel data modeling using the R software environment. After reviewing standard linear models, the authors present the basics of multilevel models and explain how to fit these models using R. They then show how to employ multilevel modeling with longitudinal data and demonstrate the valuable graphical options in R. The book also describes models for categorical dependent variables in both single level and multilevel data. The book concludes with Bayesian fitting of multilevel models. For those new to R, the appendix provides an introduction to this system that covers basic R knowledge necessary to run the models in the book. Through the R code and detailed explanations provided, this book gives you the tools to launch your own investigations in multilevel modeling and gain insight into your research.