Latino Politics and Arizona s Immigration Law SB 1070

Author: Lisa Magaña
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461402964
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Arizona has one of the fastest growing communities of Latino immigrants in the United States. In response to accusations that the Federal government was hampering the immigration enforcement actions of Arizona police, state Senator Russell Pearce introduced the “Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act.” Better known as SB 1070, the policy allows police officers in Arizona to arrest unauthorized immigrants under the state’s trespassing law. The law also gives officers the latitude to question and detain those that may appear suspicious, which may simply mean that they appear Latino. Under the State’s statute, immigrants can also be criminalized for their mere presence in Arizona. The bill was signed into law on April 23, 2010, which generated a number of immensely complex issues at the local, national and international level The measure has affected an already problematic U.S.-Mexico, bi-national relationship at a time of increased security cooperation between the two countries. Furthermore, former the President of Mexico has criticized the law, issuing travel advisories, and as a sanction, trade between Arizona and Mexico has been reduced. Elected officials across the country called for a variety of economic boycotts and campaigns that would discourage the full implementation of the law. Over fifteen major cities have ended business contracts with Arizona. The State tourism industry has lost almost one billion dollars in less than six months as a result of this policy. This book examines a variety of issues and consequences of SB 1070 at the local, national and international level. It provides timely research and analysis on a topic not previously examined and from a variety of inter disciplinary approaches, making it of interest to political scientists and policy-makers alike.

Human Smuggling and Border Crossings

Author: Gabriella Sanchez
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134483090
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Graphic narratives of tragedies involving the journeys of irregular migrants trying to reach destinations in the global north are common in the media and are blamed almost invariably on human smuggling facilitators, described as rapacious members of highly structured underground transnational criminal organizations, who take advantage of migrants and prey upon their vulnerability. This book contributes to the current scholarship on migration by providing a window into the lives and experiences of those behind the facilitation of irregular border crossing journeys. Based on fieldwork conducted among coyotes in Arizona - the main point of entry for irregular migrants in the United States by the turn of the 21st Century - this project goes beyond traditional narratives of victimization and financial exploitation and asks: who are the men and women behind the journeys of irregular migrants worldwide? How and why do they enter the human smuggling market? How are they organized? How do they understand their roles in transnational migration? How do they explain the violence and victimization so many migrants face while in transit? This book is suitable for students and academics involved in the study of migration, border enforcement and migrant and refugee criminalization.

Arizona Firestorm

Author: Otto Santa Ana
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 1442214171
Format: PDF, ePub
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Arizona Firestorm brings together well respected experts from across the political spectrum to examine and contextualize the political, economic, historical, and legal issues prompted by this and other anti-Latino and anti-immigrant legislation and state actions. It also addresses the media’s role in shaping immigration discourse in Arizona and elsewhere.

Social Justice in the U S Mexico Border Region

Author: Mark Lusk
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9400741502
Format: PDF, ePub
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The U.S.-Mexico Border Region is among the poorest geographical areas in the United States. The region has been long characterized by dual development, poor infrastructure, weak schools, health disparities and low-wage employment. More recently, the region has been affected by the violence associated with a drug and crime war in Mexico. The premise of this book is that the U.S.-Mexico Border Region is subject to systematic oppression and that the so-called social pathologies that we see in the region are by-products of social and economic injustice in the form of labor exploitation, environmental racism, immigration militarism, institutional sexism and discrimination, health inequities, a political economy based on low-wage labor, and the globalization of labor and capital. The chapters address a variety of examples of injustice in the areas of environment, health disparity, migration unemployment, citizenship, women and gender violence, mental health, and drug violence. The book proposes a pathway to development.

Voting and Migration Patterns in the U S

Author: George Hawley
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135044058
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In recent years, political scientists and journalists have taken a great interest in the question of whether the American electorate is "sorting" into communities based on partisan affiliation. That is, there is concern that American communities are becoming increasingly politically homogenous and this is because Americans are considering politics explicitly when determining where to live. Academics have since debated the degree to which this is a real phenomenon and, if it is, whether it has important normative implications. However, little empirical research has examined which factors turned some closely-contested counties into Republican enclaves and others into Democratic strongholds. Examining individual and aggregate data and employing a large number of statistical methods, George Hawley explores the increasing political homogenization of small geographic units and explains the causal mechanisms driving this phenomenon as well as its consequences for individual political attitudes and behavior among residents residing in these geographic units. He argues that some partisans are self-selecting into communities of likeminded partisans, causing some areas to become overwhelmingly Republican and others to become overwhelmingly Democratic. The book also notes that the migratory patterns of Republicans and Democrats differ in systematic ways for other reasons, due to the different demographic and economic characteristics of these partisan groups. At a time when many studies argue that a large percentage of the electorate is self-selecting into communities based on their political preferences, this bookshelf essential presents a much needed account on the different migratory patterns of Republicans and Democrats and how these patterns are shaping the geography of American politics.

Language Immigration and Naturalization

Author: Ariel Loring
Publisher: Multilingual Matters
ISBN: 1783095172
Format: PDF, ePub
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This volume focuses on the everyday legalities and practicalities of naturalization including governmental processes, the language of citizenship tests and classes, the labelling and lived experiences of immigrants/outsiders and the media’s interpretation of this process. The book brings together scholars from a wide range of specialities who accentuate language and raise issues that often remain unarticulated or masked in the media. The contributors highlight how governmental policies and practices affect native-born citizens and residents differently on the basis of legal status. Furthermore, the authors observe that many issues that are typically seen as affecting immigrants (such as language policies, nationalist identities and feelings of belonging) also impact first-generation native-born citizens who are seen as, or see themselves as, outsiders.

Encyclopedia of Diversity and Social Justice

Author: Sherwood Thompson
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442216069
Format: PDF, ePub
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This encyclopedia contains over 300 entries alphabetically arranged for straightforward use by scholars and general readers alike. Thompson, assisted by a network of contributors and consultants, provides a comprehensive and systematic collection of designated entries that describe, in detail, important diversity and social justice themes.

No Borders

Author: Emma Bell
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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It is often asserted that neoliberal globalisation has had the liberating effect of breaking clown traditional borders as barriers to free trade are swept away. Yet, in practice, recent decades have seen the erection of a host of new boundarics and the reinforcement of old ones. Boundaries continue to be a salient feature of the contemporary political, geographical and social landscape. National and extra-national boundaries have been reinforced, particularly in the European security state and beyond as ever-stricter immigration controls are adopted. Through an analysis of immigration policies in Europe, the United States and Australia, this book aims to challenge both the physical and metaphorical borders that divide citizens from migrants, `bogus' asylum-seekers from the `genuine', `legal' from `illegal' migrants... Rather than seeing immigration as problematic in itself, this collection instead regards barriers to immigration as problematic to the extent that they contribute to the marginalisation, criminalisation and even death of those who seek to make a better life for themselves in another country and tend to obfuscate the cultural, social and economic benefits which migration might bring to host countries.

Border lines

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Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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Border-Lines is an interdisciplinary academic journal dedicated to the dissemination of research on Chicana/o-Latina/o cultural, political, and social issues.

Latino Immigrants in the United States

Author: Ronald L. Mize
Publisher: Polity
ISBN: 074564743X
Format: PDF
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This timely and important book introduces readers to the largest and fastest-growing minority group in the United States - Latinos - and their diverse conditions of departure and reception. A central theme of the book is the tension between the fact that Latino categories are most often assigned from above, and how those defined as Latino seek to make sense of and enliven a shared notion of identity from below. Providing a sophisticated introduction to emerging theoretical trends and social formations specific to Latino immigrants, chapters are structured around the topics of Latinidad or the idea of a pan-ethnic Latino identity, pathways to citizenship, cultural citizenship, labor, gender, transnationalism, and globalization. Specific areas of focus include the 2006 marches of the immigrant rights movement and the rise in neoliberal nativism (including both state-sponsored restrictions such as Arizona’s SB1070 and the hate crimes associated with Minutemen vigilantism). The book is a valuable contribution to immigration courses in sociology, history, ethnic studies, American Studies, and Latino Studies. It is one of the first, and certainly the most accessible, to fully take into account the plurality of experiences, identities, and national origins constituting the Latino category.