Learner centred Education in International Perspective

Author: Michele Schweisfurth
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415600723
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Is learner-centred education appropriate for all societies and classrooms? Learner-centred education (LCE) is a travelling policy, widely promoted by international agencies and national governments. Arguments in favour of this pedagogical tradition refer to theories and evidence from cognitive psychology, claiming that all learners can benefit equally from its judicious use. Beyond the benefits to the individual however, lie a set of assumptions about learner-centred education as a foundation for the building of democratic citizens and societies, suitable for economies of the future. These promises have been questioned by critics who doubt that it is appropriate in all cultural and resource contexts, and there is considerable evidence in the global South of perennial problems of implementation. In the light of these debates, is LCE still a good development 'bet'? This book provides an authoritative and balanced investigation of these issues, exploring the contextual factors from global movements to local resourcing realities which have fuelled it as a discourse and affected its practice. In the light of the theoretical underpinnings and research evidence, the book addresses pressing questions: to what extent is learner-centred education a sound choice for policy and practice in developing countries? And if it is a sound choice, under which conditions is it a viable one? The book is divided into three key parts: - Learner-centred Education as a Global Phenomenon - Learner-centred Education in Lower and Middle-income Countries - Lessons and Resolutions This book provides a much-needed fresh analysis of the concept and practice of LCE. It will be valuable reading for academics and post-graduates with a focus on comparative and international education, along with policy-makers in developing countries and development agencies.

Learner centred Education in International Perspective

Author: Michele Schweisfurth
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136729127
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Is learner-centred education appropriate for all societies and classrooms? Learner-centred education (LCE) is a travelling policy, widely promoted by international agencies and national governments. Arguments in favour of this pedagogical tradition refer to theories and evidence from cognitive psychology, claiming that all learners can benefit equally from its judicious use. Beyond the benefits to the individual however, lie a set of assumptions about learner-centred education as a foundation for the building of democratic citizens and societies, suitable for economies of the future. These promises have been questioned by critics who doubt that it is appropriate in all cultural and resource contexts, and there is considerable evidence in the global South of perennial problems of implementation. In the light of these debates, is LCE still a good development ‘bet’? This book provides an authoritative and balanced investigation of these issues, exploring the contextual factors from global movements to local resourcing realities which have fuelled it as a discourse and affected its practice. In the light of the theoretical underpinnings and research evidence, the book addresses pressing questions: to what extent is learner-centred education a sound choice for policy and practice in developing countries? And if it is a sound choice, under which conditions is it a viable one? The book is divided into three key parts: - Learner-centred Education as a Global Phenomenon - Learner-centred Education in Lower and Middle-income Countries - Lessons and Resolutions This book provides a much-needed fresh analysis of the concept and practice of LCE. It will be valuable reading for academics and post-graduates with a focus on comparative and international education, along with policy-makers in developing countries and development agencies.

Learner Centred Education in International Perspective

Author: Michele Schweisfurth
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9781138929319
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Is learner-centred education appropriate for all societies and classrooms? Learner-centred education (LCE) is a travelling policy, widely promoted by international agencies and national governments. Arguments in favour of this pedagogical tradition refer to theories and evidence from cognitive psychology, claiming that all learners can benefit equally from its judicious use. Beyond the benefits to the individual however, lie a set of assumptions about learner-centred education as a foundation for the building of democratic citizens and societies, suitable for economies of the future. These promises have been questioned by critics who doubt that it is appropriate in all cultural and resource contexts, and there is considerable evidence in the global South of perennial problems of implementation. In the light of these debates, is LCE still a good development 'bet'? This book provides an authoritative and balanced investigation of these issues, exploring the contextual factors from global movements to local resourcing realities which have fuelled it as a discourse and affected its practice. In the light of the theoretical underpinnings and research evidence, the book addresses pressing questions: to what extent is learner-centred education a sound choice for policy and practice in developing countries? And if it is a sound choice, under which conditions is it a viable one? The book is divided into three key parts: - Learner-centred Education as a Global Phenomenon - Learner-centred Education in Lower and Middle-income Countries - Lessons and Resolutions This book provides a much-needed fresh analysis of the concept and practice of LCE. It will be valuable reading for academics and post-graduates with a focus on comparative and international education, along with policy-makers in developing countries and development agencies.

Educating Entrepreneurial Citizens

Author: Joan DeJaeghere
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1315535602
Format: PDF
Download Now
Educating Entrepreneurial Citizens examines the multiple and contradictory purposes and effects of entrepreneurship education aimed at addressing youth unemployment and alleviating poverty in Tanzania. Governments in sub-Saharan Africa face increasing pressure to educate young people through secondary school, supposedly equipping them with knowledge and skills for employment and their future. At the same time, many youths do not complete their education and there are insufficient jobs to employ graduates. The development community sees entrepreneurship education as one viable solution to the double edged problem of inadequate education and few jobs. But while entrepreneurship education is aligned with a governing rationality of neoliberalism that requires individuals to create their own livelihoods without government social supports, the two NGO programs discussed in this book draw on a rights-based discourse that seeks to educate those not served by government schools, providing them with educational and social supports to be included in society. The chapters explore the tensions that occur when international organizations and NGOs draw on both neoliberal and liberal human rights discourses to address the problems of poverty, unemployment and poor quality education. Furthermore, when these neo/liberal perspectives meet local ideas of reciprocity and solidarity, they create friction and alter the programs and effects they have on youth. The book introduces the concept of entrepreneurial citizens—those who utilize their innovative skills and behaviors to claim both economic and social rights from which they had been previously excluded. The programs taught youth how to develop their own enterprises, to earn profits, and to save for their own futures; but youth used their education, skills and labor to provide for basic needs, to be included in society, and to support their and their families’ well-being. By showing the contradictory effects of entrepreneurship education programs, the book asks international agencies and governments to consider how they can go beyond technical approaches of creating enterprises and increasing income, and head toward approaches that consider the kinds of labor that young people and communities value for their wellbeing. This book will be of interest to scholars and practitioners of education and international development, youth studies, African Studies and entrepreneurship/social entrepreneurship education.

The Theory and Practice of Development Education

Author: Douglas Bourn
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131761903X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Development education is much more than learning about development; it is a pedagogy for the globalised societies of the twenty-first century that incorporates discourses from critical pedagogy and postcolonialism, and a mechanism for ensuring that differing perspectives are reflected within education, particularly those from developing countries. Learning about development and global issues is now part of the school curriculum in a number of countries, and terms such as global citizenship, sustainable development and cultural understanding are commonplace in many educational contexts. Development education has been recognised as one of the educational discourses that has influenced the acceptance of these terms, for both policy-makers and practitioners. This ground-breaking volume addresses the history, theoretical influences, practices and impact of development education in Europe, North America, Australia and Japan. Chapters include how development education evolved, the influence of theorists such as Paulo Freire, the practices of aid and development agencies, and the impact of governments seeking evidence of public understanding of and engagement with development. The Theory and Practice of Development Education provides essential reading for anyone engaged in re-thinking and reflecting upon the educational needs of a globalised society, and seeking approaches towards learning that place social justice at the heart of that practice. It will be of particular interest to academics and postgraduate students in the fields of development education, international education and globalisation.

Gender Violence in Poverty Contexts

Author: Jenny Parkes
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113466544X
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
This book is concerned with understanding the complex ways in which gender violence and poverty impact on young people’s lives, and the potential for education to challenge violence. Although there has been a recent expansion of research on gender violence and schooling, the field of research that brings together thinking on gender violence, poverty and education is in its infancy. This book sets out to establish this new field by offering innovative research insights into the nature of violence affecting children and young people; the sources of violence, including the relationship with poverty and inequality; the effects of violence on young subjectivities; and the educational challenge of how to counter violence. Authors address three interrelated aims in their chapters: to identify theoretical and methodological framings for understanding the relationship between gender, violence, poverty and education to demonstrate how young people living in varying contexts of poverty in the Global South learn about, engage in, respond to and resist gender violence to investigate how institutions, including schools, families, communities, governments, international and non-governmental organisations and the media constrain or expand possibilities to challenge gender violence in the Global South. Describing a range of innovative research projects, the chapters display what scholarly work can offer to help meet the educational challenge, and to find ways to help young people and those around them to understand, resist and rupture the many faces of violence. Gender Violence in Poverty Contexts will appeal to an international audience of postgraduate students, academics and researchers in the fields of international and comparative education, gender and women’s studies, teacher education, poverty, development and conflict studies, African and Asian studies and related disciplines. It will also be of interest to professionals in NGOs and other organisations, and policy makers, keen to develop research-informed practice. Winner of the 2016 Jackie Kirk Outstanding Book Award.

How People Learn

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309131979
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. Topics include: How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain. How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn. What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach. The amazing learning potential of infants. The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace. Learning needs and opportunities for teachers. A realistic look at the role of technology in education.

Pedagogies for Development

Author: Arathi Sriprakash
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9400726694
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Pedagogies for Development takes a sociological approach to examine the introduction of child-centred education in contemporary Indian policy and school contexts. It investigates the promise of democratic learning in development discourses to ask how far child-centred models can address poverty and social inequalities in rural Indian communities. Drawing on in-depth ethnographic research conducted in the south Indian state of Karnataka, the book offers a multi-level analysis of international, national and state education practices of pedagogic reform. The book contributes to pressing debates about how ‘quality’ education should be conceptualised and assessed in development contexts, and brings into focus the assumptions which associate schooling to social justice.

Teaching and Learning in Context

Author: Richard Tabulawa
Publisher: African Books Collective
ISBN: 2869785690
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Since the 1990s, sub-Saharan Africa has experienced unprecedented attempts at reforming teacher and student classroom practices, with a learner-centred pedagogy regarded as an effective antidote to the prevalence of teacher-centred didactic classroom practices. Attempts at reform have been going on all over the continent. In fact, learner-centred pedagogy has been described as one of the most pervasive educational ideas in contemporary sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere. Research has revealed that the major attempts have largely failed mainly because teachers have not been able to adopt instructional innovations to technical problems. This failure is also related to lack of resources, and poor teacher training programmes which lead to poor teacher quality, among others. This book attempts to explain why pedagogical change has not occurred in spite of the much energy and resources that have been committed to such reforms.The book also takes us inside what the author calls 'the socio-cultural world of African classrooms' to help us understand the reasons teachers dominate classroom life and rely disproportionately on didactic methods of teaching. Its conceptual analyses capture the best of both the sociology and the anthropology of education in contexts of poverty, as well as the politics of education.The book concludes that a socio-cultural approach should be the basis for developing culturally responsive indigenous pedagogies, though these may or may not turn out to be in any way akin to constructivist learner-centred pedagogies.