Learning to Teach in Urban Schools

Author: Etta R. Hollins
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136715541
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book is about the transition from teacher preparation to teaching practice in urban school settings. It provides a clear presentation of the challenges, resources, and opportunities for learning to teach in urban schools; examples of the experiences, perceptions, and practices of teachers who are effective in urban schools and those who are not; a detailed account of the journey of a team of teachers who transformed their practice to improve learning in a low performing urban school; an approach that can be used by novice teachers in joining a teacher community and making the transition from preparation to practice; and perspective on leadership that can be used to create a context for transforming teacher professional development in an urban school district. Learning to Teach in Urban Schools offers rare insight into how teachers can transform their own practice and in the process, transform the culture of low performing urban schools.

Urban Teaching in America

Author: Andrea J. Stairs
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1452267499
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Urban Teaching in America: Theory, Research, and Practice in K-12 Classrooms is a brief yet comprehensive overview of urban teaching. Undergraduate and graduate students who are new to the urban context will develop a deeper understanding of the urban teaching environment and the challenges and opportunities they can expect to face while teaching in it. The authors have combined the work of urban education theorists, researchers, and practitioners to demonstrate that urban students bring many resources to their learning environment and can often serve as educators to the teachers themselves. Readers will feel prepared to challenge, rather than maintain, the status quo after reading this book.

Self study and Inquiry Into Practice

Author: Linda Kroll
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415600707
Format: PDF
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"One of the most important factors in making sure that all children achieve well is widely regarded to be a well-prepared teacher and this is particularly the case for those who teach in urban settings. There are new pressures and familiar pressures on teachers and teacher educators to prepare teachers who will be able to teach in a changing world, and who will be able to change the world. The question of how to prepare well-qualified teachers has become an international question with global responses and consequences. This book describes a stance and pedagogy for helping young teachers to be successful in the most challenging of circumstances. Self-Study and Inquiry into Practice: Learning to teach for equity and social justice is about learning to use inquiry to teach in urban settings. The use of inquiry and self-study as ways of thinking about, understanding and developing one's practice and one's teaching can support teachers' continued inspiration and resilience to teach all children well in the face of very challenging circumstances. Using rich examples and case studies of how pre-service teachers and beginning teachers have used inquiry to learn from challenging urban placements, Linda Kroll shows the importance of using inquiry and self-study in learning to teach and in continuing to learn as one teaches. Inquiry and self-study is a useful way to understand what students understand, what they learn from our teaching, and the power and responsibility we have to ensure that all our students achieve their highest potential"--

The First Year of Teaching

Author: Jabari Mahiri
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807773174
Format: PDF, Kindle
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For first-year teachers entering the nation’s urban schools, the task of establishing a strong and successful practice is often extremely challenging. In this compelling look at first-year teachers’ practice in urban schools, editors Jabari Mahiri and Sarah Warshauer Freedman demonstrate how a program of systematic classroom research by teachers themselves enables them to effectively target instruction and improve their own practice. The book organizes the teachers’ research into three broad areas, corresponding to issues the new teachers identified as the most challenging: Crafting Curriculum—how to engage students in learning curricular content, develop their abilities to meet standards, and prepare them for college or careers. Complicating Culture—how to build on the different languages and cultures found in contemporary schools. Conceptualizing Control—how to manage a classroom of 30 or more teenagers and create a climate where learning can take place. The First Year of Teaching offers an array of classroom scenarios that will spark in-depth discussions in teacher preparation classes and professional development workshops, particularly in the context of problem-based, problem-posing pedagogies. “The First Year of Teaching offers us knowledge about urban schools which we could only get by academics and teachers working together. Documenting three themes concerning the complications of curriculum, culture, and control, we learn significant practices that make a difference for new teachers and their students. This is a must-read for teachers, researchers, and policymakers who want to improve urban education now.” —Ann Lieberman, senior scholar, Stanford University “This volume marvelously demonstrates how teaching and learning can be improved by positioning new teachers as researchers within a systematic process for increasing their effectiveness in complex, diverse city schools. Through each seamlessly integrated chapter the authors show us how critical teacher inquiry can provide the meaningful insight and stance needed to inspire engaged pedagogical practice. The First Year of Teaching will serve as a tremendous resource for preservice teacher education, professional development programs across the career span, and university classes on urban education and teacher learning.” —Ernest Morrell, director, Institute for Urban and Minority Education, Teachers College, Columbia University

Transforming Urban Education

Author: Kenneth Tobin
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9462095639
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Transformations in Urban Education: Urban Teachers and Students Working Collaboratively addresses pressing problems in urban education, contextualized in research in New York City and nearby school districts on the Northeast Coast of the United States. The schools and institutions involved in empirical studies range from elementary through college and include public and private schools, alternative schools for dropouts, and museums. Difference is regarded as a resource for learning and equity issues are examined in terms of race, ethnicity, language proficiency, designation as special education, and gender. The contexts for research on teaching and learning involve science, mathematics, uses of technology, literacy, and writing comic books. A dual focus addresses research on teaching and learning, and learning to teach in urban schools. Collaborative activities addressed explicitly are teachers and students enacting roles of researchers in their own classrooms, cogenerative dialogues as activities to allow teachers and students to learn about one another’s cultures and express their perspectives on their experienced realities and negotiate shared recommendations for changes to enacted curricula. Coteaching is also examined as a means of learning to teach, teaching and learning, and undertaking research. The scholarship presented in the constituent chapters is diverse, reflecting multi-logicality within sociocultural frameworks that include cultural sociology, cultural historical activity theory, prosody, sense of place, and hermeneutic phenomenology. Methodologies employed in the research include narratology, interpretive, reflexive, and authentic inquiry, and multi-level inquiries of video resources combined with interpretive analyses of social artifacts selected from learning environments. This edited volume provides insights into research of places in which social life is enacted as if there were no research being undertaken. The research was intended to improve practice. Teachers and learners, as research participants, were primarily concerned with teaching and learning and, as a consequence, as we learned from research participants were made aware of what we learned—the purpose being to improve learning environments. Accordingly, research designs are contingent on what happens and emergent in that what we learned changed what happened and expanded possibilities to research and learn about transformation through heightening participants’ awareness about possibilities for change and developing interventions to improve learning.

What a Coach Can Teach a Teacher

Author: Jeffrey Michael Reyes Duncan-Andrade
Publisher: Peter Lang
ISBN: 9780820479057
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This book, written by an experienced urban classroom teacher and coach, aims to document effective practices in urban schools and to provide insight into productive program building and educational practices. The book rejects the up-by-your-bootstraps theory of success, offering in its place a set of concrete strategies for teachers and educational leaders who are committed to fundamentaiiy rethinking the business-as-usual approach which continues to fail urban school children. This book is well-suited for classes working with educational leaders, classroom teachers, sports coaches, and educational researchers. "An educator, a theorist, an activist, and a coach...Jeffrey M.R. Duncan-Andrade draws on all of these roles to explain what it takes to teach and motivate young people to succeed. Through this skillful analysis of the role of sports in the lives of urban youth, Duncan-Andrade reveals how educators can buiid relationships and develop a deeper sense of meaning about the purpose of education with the young people they serve. An inspiring, insightful analysis and an invaluable guide for those who recognize the potential for education to transform lives and empower urban youth." ---Pedro A, Noguera, Peter L. Agnew Professor of Education, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Development; Executive Director, Metropolitan Center for Urban Education, New York University "Jeffrey M.R. Duncan-Andrade always presents us with a freshness...fresh ideas, fresh analysis, fresh perspectives. It is no different in this volume. One of the freshest takes on coaching, teaching, and learning from a critical perspective." ---Gloria Ladson-Biltings, Professor and Chair, Department of Curriculum and Instruction; Keilner Family Chair in Urban Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison "This is a book for anyone who cares to chart a path for children and youth in urban schools. There is so much to recommend in this book, but above it ail is'the sense of optirnism that sports can be a tool for empowerment for all our kids, whether or not they have pro potential."---Dave Zirin, Author of A People's History of Sports' in the U.S.

Identity Work in the Classroom

Author: Cheryl Jones-Walker
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807756911
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book provides classroom examples to demonstrate how identity-making is integral to the teaching and learning process. Responding to school reform efforts that focus on top-down reform measures, this book proposes "identity work" as an alternative approach. The author argues that efforts to improve urban schools should recognize the importance of relational change that focuses on deepening personal interactions between students and teachers, teachers and other teachers, and schools and parents. Based on an in-depth study of two classrooms in urban K - 8 schools, the book illuminates the importance of allowing teachers the freedom to make pedagogical adjustments based on their knowledge of students' needs, backgrounds, and interests. This volume reframes our understanding of urban schools and raises questions about the goals of local and ferderal reform and what's at stake for educational systems.

Urban Education for the 21st Century

Author: Festus E. Obiakor
Publisher: Charles C Thomas Publisher
ISBN: 039807612X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This timely book exposes the complexities and realities facing urbanness and urban schools that are inadequately funded and denigrated, along with students who continue to be misidentified, misassessed, miscategorized, misplaced, and misinstructed by illprepared and unprepared educators and service providers. The text very successfully demonstrates the comprehensive nature and connectedness of problems and prospects in urban education. This book will be an added resource to researchers, scholars, educators, and service providers. It should be an excellent required text for graduate and undergraduate courses in all branches of education. Addition-ally, the book will be of interest to education administrators at all levels, public school teachers, policy makers, and change agents. The thirteen chapters discuss and explore the following primary topics:• Urban education and the quest for democracy, equity, and excellence• Educating urban learners with and without special needs• Personnel preparation and urban schools• Teaching and learning in urban schools• Educational leadership in urban schools• Insights into educational psychology and what urban practitioners must know• Managing violence in urban schools• Financing urban schools• Reducing the power of “whiteness” in urban schools• Promises and challenges of building and the future perspectives of urban education.

Improving Urban Science Education

Author: Kenneth George Tobin
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742537057
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Examines high school science education in urban classrooms and provides suggestions on improvements that can be made to overcome social and cultural differences that impede meaningful learning.