Legislating The Holocaust

Author: Karl Schleunes
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0429978871
Format: PDF, ePub
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From April 1933 to early 1943, Bernard Loesener served as the official ?Jewish Expert? in the German Third Reich's Ministry of the Interior, the government body responsible for the Nazi's legislative assault on German Jewry. In that role, he personally drafted much of the legislation, the Nuremberg Laws of 1935 preeminently, that gradually dispossessed, disenfranchised, and dehumanized the Jews of Nazi Germany. During the first six years of Nazi rule, the seminal period of government-sponsored anti-Semitism, Loesener kept the minutes of many crucial, high-level, inter-ministerial conferences concerned with the ?Jewish Question.? As observer and participant, his experiences were virtually unparalleled. In 1950, Loesener penned a memoir that sought to explain, and justify, his actions during the ten-year escalation of Nazi oppression that resulted, to Loesener's professed horror, in the Final Solution. It was published in 1961, in German, by the journal Vierteljahrshefte fuer Zeitgeschichte. It has never before appeared in English, until now - in Legislating the Holocaust.

A History of the Holocaust

Author: Rita Steinhardt Botwinick
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315508311
Format: PDF
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Told with scrupulous attention to detail and accuracy, this text provides important background information on Jewish life in Europe, the functions of the hierarchy within the Nazi government, and the psychological foundations of prejudice. Unlike other texts on the subject, A History of the Holocaust gives students an idea of just who the victims of the Holocaust were. In fact, the author tells this story from a unique point-of-view, having experienced Nazi Germany as a child.

The Twisted Road to Auschwitz

Author: Karl A. Schleunes
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252061479
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Since the publication of Karl Schleunes' The Twisted Road To Auschwitz in 1970 an almost inconceivably broad variety of scholarly books and articles has dealt with why and how the Holocaust came into being and what kind of mechanisms lay at the bottom of the unimaginable cruelties committed by the Nazi regime against the Jews.

Books in Print

Author: R.R. Bowker Company
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Books in print is the major source of information on books currently published and in print in the United States. The database provides the record of forthcoming books, books in-print, and books out-of-print.

Schooling and Society

Author: Karl A. Schleunes
Publisher: Berg Pub Limited
ISBN: 9780854962679
Format: PDF, ePub
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This monograph is on the social and political history of Germany in the 19th century, with particular reference to the role played by the educational system in shaping society.

Jewish Immigrants in Early 1900s America

Author: Anatole Leroy-Beaulieu
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780997825411
Format: PDF, Kindle
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WITH DOZENS OF PHOTOS: French political scientist Anatole Leroy-Beaulieu's 1904 account of his visits to Immigrant Jewish communities in the United States earlier that year. A new translation.

Between Dignity and Despair

Author: Marion A. Kaplan
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195313581
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Between Dignity and Despair draws on the extraordinary memoirs, diaries, interviews, and letters of Jewish women and men to give us the first intimate portrait of Jewish life in Nazi Germany. Kaplan tells the story of Jews in Germany not from the hindsight of the Holocaust, nor by focusing on the persecutors, but from the bewildered and ambiguous perspective of Jews trying to navigate their daily lives in a world that was becoming more and more insane. Answering the charge that Jews should have left earlier, Kaplan shows that far from seeming inevitable, the Holocaust was impossible to foresee precisely because Nazi repression occurred in irregular and unpredictable steps until the massive violence of Novemer 1938. Then the flow of emigration turned into a torrent, only to be stopped by the war. By that time Jews had been evicted from their homes, robbed of their possessions and their livelihoods, shunned by their former friends, persecuted by their neighbors, and driven into forced labor. For those trapped in Germany, mere survival became a nightmare of increasingly desperate options. Many took their own lives to retain at least some dignity in death; others went underground and endured the fears of nightly bombings and the even greater terror of being discovered by the Nazis. Most were murdered. All were pressed to the limit of human endurance and human loneliness. Focusing on the fate of families and particularly women's experience, Between Dignity and Despair takes us into the neighborhoods, into the kitchens, shops, and schools, to give us the shape and texture, the very feel of what it was like to be a Jew in Nazi Germany.

The Long Lasting Journey

Author: Leo Pevsner
Publisher: AuthorHouse
ISBN: 1481744712
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Over three thousand years separate the exodus of biblical Jews from the land of Egypt and the last wave of Jewish migrants to exit Russia. Today, hundreds of thousands of Russian Jews find themselves in the United States, Israel, and elsewhere. What made them depart this time around? What country are they loyal to? And finally, who is a Russian Jew? The Long Lasting Journey is about a people in quest of a better destiny. The story is written against the backdrop of dramatic political developments in two world superpowers in the second half of the twentieth century. Historical and social conditions of the past century have formed the distinct culture of Soviet Jews - an educated, ambitious, secular, and yet conservative people. For these people, the journey is a cultural integration to a new society - a society with a social order polar opposite from that of their own. It is also about the principle fiber of a people with a split identity. They are deeply rooted in Russian culture but maintain an elusive difference from the Russian majority; they consider themselves Jewish but are essentially distant from Judaism; they carry on an American way of life but their mind-set alienates them from the US mainstream. A mixture of personal divisive experiences, focused observations, and subjective reflections about these people of the last exodus determined the substance of this first person narrative. The Long Lasting Journey outlines the cultural merits left behind in one world and found in another.

Emerging Metropolis

Author: Annie Polland
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 147981105X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Emerging Metropolis tells the story of New York’s emergence as the greatest Jewish city of all time. It explores the Central European and East European Jews’ encounter with New York City, tracing immigrants’ economic, social, religious, political, and cultural adaptation between 1840 and 1920. This meticulously researched volume shows how Jews wove their ambitions and aspirations—for freedom, security, and material prosperity—into the very fabric and physical landscape of the city.

The Year of Indecision 1946

Author: Kenneth Weisbrode
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698145712
Format: PDF, ePub
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A vivid account of America at the pivot point of the postwar era, Harry Truman’s first full year in office In 1946, America had just exited the biggest war in modern history and was about to enter another of a kind no one had fought before. We think of this moment as the brilliant start of America Triumphant, in world politics and economics. But the reality is murkier: 1946 brought tension between industry and labor, political disunity, bad veteran morale, housing crises, inflation, a Soviet menace—all shadowed by an indecisiveness that would plague decision makers who would waffle between engagement and isolation, as the country itself pivoted between prosperity and retrenchment, through the rest of the century. The Year of Indecision, 1946 overturns the image of Truman as a can-do leader—1946, in fact, marked a nadir in his troubled presidency. Relations broke down with the Soviet Union, and nearly did with the British. The United States suffered shortages and strikes of a magnitude it had not seen in years. In November 1946, the Democrats lost both houses of Congress. The tension between fear and optimism expressed itself too in popular culture. Americans rejoiced in talent and creative energy, but a shift was brewing: Bing Crosby making room for Bill Haley and B.B. King; John Wayne for Montgomery Clift. That year also saw a burst of spirit in literature, music, art and film—beneath the shadow of noir. The issues and tensions we face today echo those of seven decades ago. As we observe in this portrait of the era just before our own, as America learned, piecemeal and reluctantly, to act like a world power, it tried, and succeeded only partially, to master fear. Indecision, Weisbrode argues, is the leitmotif of American history. From the Hardcover edition.