How the Dreamers are Born

Author: Júlio Emílio Diniz Pereira
Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated
ISBN: 9781433120909
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book discusses the identity construction of activist educators or, as one of the research participants poetically summarizes it, «how the dreamers are born.» The dreamers, in the case of this research, are eleven women, activist educators who have participated in the Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra (Landless Workers' Movement), the MST. This book explores how the development of one's identity as an activist educator is a long and complex social, political, and cultural process involving many causal elements. The MST, one of the largest social movements in contemporary Latin America and one of the most successful grassroots movements in the world, has struggled for agrarian reform as well as social and economic justice in Brazil, achieving impressive results. Its members include people from some of the poorest segments of Brazilian society. This book presents a powerful analysis of their incredible life stories (testimonios), collected through semi-structured interviews with women educators, seeking to uncover the main elements that account for the development of their identities as activist educators. Finally, the book addresses the implications of its research findings for social justice teacher education.

Life History Research In Educational Settings

Author: Goodson
Publisher: Open University Press
ISBN: 9780335207138
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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It has long been recognised that life history method has a great deal to offer to those engaged in social research. Indeed, right from the start of the twentieth century, eminent sociologists such as W.I. Thomas, C. Wright Mills and Herbert Blumer have suggested that it is the best, the perfect, approach for studying any aspect of social life. In recent years, life history has become increasingly popular with researchers investigating educational topics of all kinds, including: teachers' perceptions and experiences of different areas of their lives and careers; curriculum and subject development; pedagogical practice; and managerial concerns. Life History Research in Educational Settings sets out to explore and consider the various reasons for this popularity and makes the case that the approach has a major and unique contribution to make to understandings of schools, schooling and educational experience however characterised. The book draws extensively on examples of life history research in order to illustrate theoretical, methodological, ethical and practical issues.

Wisconsin in the Civil War

Author: Frank Klement
Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society
ISBN: 0870206265
Format: PDF, ePub
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The final book by Marquette University historian Frank L. Klement (1905-1994), this is a vivid chronological narrative of Wisconsin's role in the pivotal event in American history. In this volume, Klement greatly expanded his 1962 booklet on this topic, adding new material on each of Wisconsin's fifty-three infantry regiments, political and constitutional issues, soldiers voting, women and the war, and Wisconsin's black soldiers.

Fire Within

Author: Kerry A. Trask
Publisher: Kent State University Press
ISBN: 9780873385879
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Fire Within explores what Walt Whitman called the interior history of the Civil War - the war waged and witnessed by common people. Through diaries, letters, and newspaper articles, Kerry Trask weaves together personal viewpoints and wartime events to reflect the passions of the times and describes the conflicts encountered by the men who went to war and the people who remained at home. This colorful, often moving account reveals the experience of James Anderson, a young Scottish immigrant who enlisted in the 5th Wisconsin Volunteers soon after President Lincoln issued his first call. Leaving his home of Manitowoc, Wisconsin, he, like many other young men, set off with expectations of high adventure. Anderson's rendering of the war is further enriched by Rosa Kellner's splendid journal. From the Williams House Hotel, this teenage Bohemian innkeeper was a spectator and participant in the community. Her writings offer essential insights into wartime life on the homefront. For soldiers and civilians this real war was often difficult and painful. What they wrote in their letters and diaries offers a look at the conflict from a small-town perspective and reveals the true nature of war. An engaging work, Fire Within will appeal to the general reading public as well as to Civil War scholars and specialists.

9XM Talking

Author: Randall Davidson
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 9780299218737
Format: PDF, Mobi
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These words crackled in the headphones of crystal sets around the country in 1921 as the University of Wisconsin radio station 9XM began its regular schedule of voice broadcasts. Randall Davidson provides the first comprehensive history of the University of Wisconsin radio station, WHA; affiliated state-owned station, WLBL; and the post-World War II FM stations that are the backbone of the network now known as Wisconsin Public Radio. 9XM Talking describes how, with homemade equipment and ideas developed from scratch, 9XM endured many struggles and became a tangible example of "the Wisconsin Idea," bringing the educational riches of the university to all the state's residents. From the beginning, those involved with the radio station felt it should provide a service for the practical use of Wisconsin citizens. The book's informative chapters cover the programs that allowed the medium of radio to benefit farmers and homemakers, to bring world-class educators into isolated rural schoolrooms, and to teach people all over Wisconsin everything from literature to history to touch-typing, long before anyone came up with the term "distance learning." Davidson concludes by discussing the claim that WHA has to the title "Oldest Station in the Nation." This groundbreaking book is based on archival materials dating back to the 1900s and includes dozens of historic photos and illustrations, many of which have never been published before. Winner, Book Award of Merit for best Wisconsin history book, Wisconsin Historical Society

Lessons from the Heartland

Author: Barbara Miner
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1595588647
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In a magisterial work of narrative nonfiction that weaves together the racially fraught history of public education in Milwaukee and the broader story of hypersegregation in the rust belt, Lessons from the Heartland tells of an iconic city’s fall from grace—and of its chance for redemption in the twenty-first century. A symbol of middle American working-class values and pride, Wisconsin—and in particular urban Milwaukee—has been at the forefront of a half-century of public education experiments, from desegregation and “school choice,” to vouchers and charter schools. Picking up where J. Anthony Lukas’s Pulitzer Prize–winning Common Ground left off, Lessons from the Heartland offers a sweeping narrative portrait of an All-American city at the epicenter of American public education reform, and an exploration of larger issues of race and class in our democracy. Miner (whose daughters went through the Milwaukee public school system and who is a former Milwaukee Journal reporter) brings a journalist’s eye and a parent’s heart to exploring the intricate ways that jobs, housing, and schools intersect, underscoring the intrinsic link between the future of public schools and the dreams and hopes of democracy in a multicultural society. This book will change the way we think about the possibility and promise of American public education.

Educational Technology and Narrative

Author: Brad Hokanson
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319699148
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This volume is the result of a 2016 research symposium sponsored by the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) focused on the growing theoretical areas of integrating story and narrative into educational design. Narrative, or storytelling, is often used as a means for understanding, conveying, and remembering the events of our lives. Our lives become a series of stories as we use narrative to structure our thinking; stories that teach, train, socialize, and create value. The contributions in this volume examine stories and narrative in instructional design and offer a diverse exploration of instructional design and learning environments. Among the topics discussed: The narrative imperative: creating a story telling culture in the classroom. Narrative qualities of design argumentation. Scenario-based workplace training as storytelling. Designing for adult learners' metacognitive development & narrative identity. Using activity theory in designing science inquiry games . Changing the narrative of school: toward a neurocognitive redefinition of learning. Educational Technology and Narrative is an invaluable resource offering application-ready ideas to students of instructional design, instructional design practitioners, and teachers seeking to utilize theories of story and narrative to the ways that they convey and express ideas of instructional design and educational technology.

Narrative Inquiry in Music Education

Author: Margaret S. Barrett
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1402098626
Format: PDF, ePub
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Margaret S. Barrett and Sandra L. Stauffer We live in a “congenial moment for stories” (Pinnegar & Daynes, 2007, p. 30), a time in which narrative has taken up a place in the “landscape” of inquiry in the social sciences. This renewed interest in storying and stories as both process and product (as eld text and research text) of inquiry may be attributed to various methodological and conceptual “turns,” including the linguistic and cultural, that have taken place in the humanities and social sciences over the past decades. The purpose of this book is to explore the “narrative turn” in music education, to - amine the uses of narrative inquiry for music education, and to cultivate ground for narrative inquiry to seed and ourish alongside other methodological approaches in music education. In a discipline whose early research strength was founded on an alignment with thesocialsciences,particularlythepsychometrictradition,oneofthekeychallenges for those embarking on narrative inquiry in music education is to ensure that its use is more than that of a “musical ornament,” an elaboration on the established themes of psychometric inquiry, those of measurement and certainty. We suggest that narrative inquiry is more than a “turn” (as noun), “a melodic embellishment that is played around a given note” (Encarta World English Dictionary, 2007, n. p. ); it is more than elaborationon a position, the adding of extra notes to make a melody more beautiful or interesting.

Glenn Ford

Author: Peter Ford
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 0299281531
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Glenn Ford—star of such now-classic films as Gilda, Blackboard Jungle, The Big Heat, 3:10 to Yuma, and The Rounders—had rugged good looks, a long and successful career, and a glamorous Hollywood life. Yet the man who could be accessible and charming on screen retreated to a deeply private world he created behind closed doors. Glenn Ford: A Life chronicles the volatile life, relationships, and career of the renowned actor, beginning with his move from Canada to California and his initial discovery of theater. It follows Ford’s career in diverse media—from film to television to radio—and shows how Ford shifted effortlessly between genres, playing major roles in dramas, noir, westerns, and romances. This biography by Glenn Ford’s son, Peter Ford, offers an intimate view of a star’s private and public life. Included are exclusive interviews with family, friends, and professional associates, and snippets from the Ford family collection of diaries, letters, audiotapes, unpublished interviews, and rare candid photos. This biography tells a cautionary tale of Glenn Ford’s relentless infidelities and long, slow fade-out, but it also embraces his talent-driven career. The result is an authentic Hollywood story that isn’t afraid to reveal the truth. Best Books for General Audiences, selected by the American Association of School Librarians Best Books for General Audiences, selected by the Public Library Reviewers

White Folks

Author: Timothy J Lensmire
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1351719092
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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White Folks explores the experiences and stories of eight white people from a small farming community in northern Wisconsin. It examines how white people learn to be 'white' and reveals how white racial identity is dependent on people of color-even in situations where white people have little or no contact with racial others. Drawing on in-depth interviews with Delores, Frank, William, Erin, Robert, Libby, and Stan, as well as on his own experiences growing up in this same rural community, Lensmire creates a portrait of white people that highlights how their relations to people of color and their cultures are seldom simple and are characterized not just by fear and rejection, but also by attraction, envy, and desire. White Folks helps readers recognize the profound ambivalence that has characterized white thinking and feeling in relation to people of color for at least the last two hundred years. There is nothing smooth about the souls of white folks. Current antiracist work is often grounded in a white privilege framework that has proven ineffective - in part because it reduces white people to little more than the embodiment of privilege. Lensmire provides an alternative that confronts the violence at the core of white racial selves that has become increasingly visible in American society and politics, but that also illuminates conflicts and complexities there.