Linguistic Minority Students Go to College

Author: Yasuko Kanno
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136814957
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Currently, linguistic minority students – students who speak a language other than English at home – represent 21% of the entire K-12 student population and 11% of the college student population. Bringing together emerging scholarship on the growing number of college-bound linguistic minority students in the K-12 pipeline, this ground-breaking volume showcases new research on these students’ preparation for, access to, and persistence in college. Other than studies of their linguistic challenges and writing and academic literacy skills in college, little is known about the broader issues of linguistic minority students’ access to and success in college. Examining a variety of factors and circumstances that influence the process and outcome, the scope of this book goes beyond students’ language proficiency and its impact on college education, to look at issues such as student race/ethnicity, gender, SES, and parental education and expectations. It also addresses structural factors in schooling including tracking, segregation of English learners from English-fluent peers, availability and support of institutional personnel, and collegiate student identity and campus climate. Presenting state-of-the-art knowledge and mapping out a future research agenda in an extremely important and yet understudied area of inquiry, this book advances knowledge in ways that will have a real impact on policy regarding linguistic minority immigrant students’ higher education opportunities.

Linguistically Diverse Immigrant and Resident Writers

Author: Christina Ortmeier-Hooper
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317298039
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Spotlighting the challenges and realities faced by linguistically diverse immigrant and resident students in U.S. secondary schools and in their transitions from high school to community colleges and universities, this book looks at programs, interventions, and other factors that help or hinder them as they make this move. Chapters from teachers and scholars working in a variety of contexts build rich understandings of how high school literacy contexts, policies such as the proposed DREAM Act and the Common Core State Standards, bridge programs like Upward Bound, and curricula redesign in first-year college composition courses designed to recognize increasing linguistic diversity of student populations, affect the success of this growing population of students as they move from high school into higher education.

Higher Education Handbook of Theory and Research

Author: Michael B. Paulsen
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319268295
Format: PDF, Docs
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Published annually since 1985, the Handbook series provides a compendium of thorough and integrative literature reviews on a diverse array of topics of interest to the higher education scholarly and policy communities. Each chapter provides a comprehensive review of research findings on a selected topic, critiques the research literature in terms of its conceptual and methodological rigor and sets forth an agenda for future research intended to advance knowledge on the chosen topic. The Handbook focuses on a comprehensive set of central areas of study in higher education that encompasses the salient dimensions of scholarly and policy inquiries undertaken in the international higher education community. Each annual volume contains chapters on such diverse topics as research on college students and faculty, organization and administration, curriculum and instruction, policy, diversity issues, economics and finance, history and philosophy, community colleges, advances in research methodology and more. The series is fortunate to have attracted annual contributions from distinguished scholars throughout the world.

Learning Power

Author: Jeannie Oakes
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 9780807747025
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In cities across the nation, low-income African-American and Latino parents hope their children's education will bring a better life. But their schools, typically, are overcrowded, ill equipped, and shamefully under-staffed. This work offers a radical approach to school reform that stresses grassroots public activism.

Concurrent Enrollment and Academic Performance of Community College English Language Learners

Author: Stephen R. Johnson
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Community colleges provide open access and affordable options for higher education to a growing population of adult English Language Learners (ELLs) in the United States. Language minority groups, particularly native Spanish speakers, are currently the fastest growing demographic in the nation. Community college English as a Second Language (ESL) courses constitute a vital support for these students by providing adult ELL students with foundational college literacy skills. With the growing demand for college graduates in today's workforce, language minority students, like their native English-speaking (NES) counterparts, need to leave college with vendible work credentials. Community colleges need practical and affordable ways to improve learning and degree completion rates of their English language learners. College ESL programs face two key challenges in realizing this goal: (1) providing quality language preparation for vii college-bound ELLs, and (2) developing efficient ways to deliver curricula to a student population that has limited financial resources and time. This was a single institution case study that investigated two ESL curriculum models at a large urban community college. The study compared the academic performance and persistence of ELL students who studied in a sheltered ESL curriculum to ELL students who studied in a concurrent enrollment ESL curriculum that combined college-level courses with advanced ESL study. The researcher analyzed student data from college archives: transcript data, admission data, and course performance results. Data from three student groups were salient to the study - students in concurrent enrollment courses (partially-mainstreamed ESL students), students in traditional ESL courses (not mainstreamed), and native English speakers in freshmen-level general education courses. The study described the relationship between the two types of ESL curriculum and the academic performance and persistence of ELL students in each program. Findings showed that advanced ELL students were able to successfully complete select college courses as they finished their ESL program. Results indicated that early access to college courses motivated students to persist. This study can help ESL practitioners and administrators in higher education determine if a concurrent enrollment curriculum model is a viable alternative for intermediate and advanced level ELL students.