Literacy Instruction for Students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Author: Susan R. Easterbrooks, PhD
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199838550
Format: PDF, Docs
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Literacy Instruction for Students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing describes current, evidence-based practices in teaching literacy to students who are deaf or hard of hearing in the areas of phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension.

Evidence Based Practice in Educating Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

Author: Patricia Elizabeth Spencer
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190453699
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Debates about methods of supporting language development and academic skills of deaf or hard-of-hearing children have waxed and waned for more than 100 years: Will using sign language interfere with learning to use spoken language or does it offer optimal access to communication for deaf children? Does placement in classrooms with mostly hearing children enhance or impede academic and social-emotional development? Will cochlear implants or other assistive listening devices provide deaf children with sufficient input for age-appropriate reading abilities? Are traditional methods of classroom teaching effective for deaf and hard-of-hearing students? Although there is a wealth of evidence with regard to each of these issues, too often, decisions on how to best support deaf and hard-of-hearing children in developing language and academic skills are made based on incorrect or incomplete information. No matter how well-intentioned, decisions grounded in opinions, beliefs, or value judgments are insufficient to guide practice. Instead, we need to take advantage of relevant, emerging research concerning best practices and outcomes in educating deaf and hard-of-hearing learners. In this critical evaluation of what we know and what we do not know about educating deaf and hard-of-hearing students, the authors examine a wide range of educational settings and research methods that have guided deaf education in recent years--or should. The book provides a focus for future educational and research efforts, and aims to promote optimal support for deaf and hard-of-hearing learners of all ages. Co-authored by two of the most respected leaders in the field, this book summarizes and evaluates research findings across multiple disciplines pertaining to the raising and educating of deaf children, providing a comprehensive but concise record of the successes, failures, and unanswered questions in deaf education. A readily accessible and invaluable source for teachers, university students, and other professionals, Evidence-Based Practice in Educating Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students encourages readers to reconsider assumptions and delve more deeply into what we really know about deaf and hard-of-hearing children, their patterns of development, and their lifelong learning.

Early Intervention for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants Toddlers and Their Families

Author: Marilyn Sass-Lehrer
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199957746
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A "must-have" for every professional studying or working with the families of deaf and hard-of-hearing infants and toddlers, Dr. Marilyn Sass-Lehrer provides readers with the evidence-based knowledge needed to implement interdisciplinary and collaborative early interventional programming for professionals and students. Featuring a collaborative team of expert contributors across a variety of backgrounds and disciplines - including educators, audiologists, speech-language pathologists, and health care providers - Early Intervention for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Infants, Toddlers, and Their Families presents students and specialists with the fundamental knowledge they need to effectively design and deliver care to this population.

Social Competence of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children

Author: Shirin D. Antia
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019024321X
Format: PDF, Docs
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Social Competence of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children addresses the development, assessment, and promotion of social competence in children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH). Most children readily develop social competence through the mutually dependent development of social skills and social relationships. Why then write a book on the social competence of DHH children? Hearing loss, with its resulting communication challenges, has the potential to impede the development of social skills and restrict social relationships. In this volume, Shirin D. Antia and Kathryn H. Kreimeyer highlight multiple strategies that teachers, families, and community members can utilize to promote the social competence of DHH children. The authors approach this topic by first describing the development and expression of social competence in infants, as well as in preschool- and school-age hearing and DHH children. Socially competent children display a flexible repertoire of social behaviors that are appropriately utilized in varying social situations and which further children's social goals. Since social competence develops initially through interactions between infants and their caretakers, a primary consideration for children with hearing loss is that the infant and caretaker share a common communication approach to facilitate early interaction. As infants become preschool age, opportunities for interactions with other children increase and social interactions revolve around play. The development of interactive and of pretend play requires children to communicate with one another to assume roles, share fantasies, and solve social conflicts. DHH children must develop communication skills to participate in interactive play, and hearing children may need guidance to successfully engage with DHH peers. For school-age children, the importance of peer acceptance increases; DHH children need supportive situations both within and outside of school to interact with peers, develop friendships, and refine the social behaviors that promote peer acceptance. The authors present a variety of practical ways to assess the social competence of DHH children. They emphasize the role of assessment in identifying social strengths and needs to establish a basis for any necessary intervention. They then present ways to promote social competence, with a separate focus on strategies appropriate for young DHH children and for school-age DHH children. For both age groups, the authors address the role of families, professionals, schools, and communities in helping children develop the skills needed to become socially competent individuals. This book will be a valuable resource for the parents and families of DHH children, for the general and special educators who teach these children, and for the researchers who describe development and evaluate the effectiveness of strategies to promote the social competence of DHH children.

Introduction to American Deaf Culture

Author: Thomas K. Holcomb
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199777543
Format: PDF, ePub
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Introduction to American Deaf Culture provides a fresh perspective on what it means to be Deaf in contemporary hearing society. The book offers an overview of Deaf art, literature, history, and humor, and touches on political, social and cultural themes.

Deaf Cognition

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199709397
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Deaf Cognition examines the cognitive underpinnings of deaf individuals' learning. Marschark and Hauser have brought together scientists from different disciplines, which rarely interact, to share their ideas and create this book. It contributes to the science of learning by describing and testing theories that might either over or underestimate the role that audition or vision plays in learning and memory, and by shedding light on multiple pathways for learning. International experts in cognitive psychology, brain sciences, cognitive development, and deaf children offer a unique, integrative examination of cognition and learning, with discussions on their implications for deaf education. Each chapter focuses primarily on the intersection of research in cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, and deaf education. The general theme of the book is that deaf and hearing individuals differ to some extent in early experience, brain development, cognitive functioning, memory organization, and problem solving. Identifying similarities and differences among these domains provides new insights into potential methods for enhancing achievement in this traditionally under-performing population.

Reading and Deafness Theory Research and Practice

Author: Beverly J Trezek
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1111803536
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This first-of-its-kind text connects theories and research with classroom practice to provide a comprehensive and balanced view of reading and deafness that addresses a broad scope of literacy concepts. An excellent classroom resource, the text offers current and future deaf educators with research-based reading instructional practices and techniques for implementing these strategies with students. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Phonological Skills and Learning to Read

Author: Usha Goswami
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 131771654X
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book sets out to integrate recent exciting research on the precursors of reading and early reading strategies adopted by children in the classroom. It aims to develop a theory about why early phonological skills are crucial in learning to read, and shows how phonological knowledge about rhymes and other units of sound helps children learn about letter sequences when beginning to be taught to read. The authors begin by contrasting theories which suggest that children's phonological awareness is a result of the experience of learning to read and those that suggest that phonological awareness precedes, and is a causal determinant of, reading. The authors argue for a version of the second kind of theory and show that children are aware of speech units, called onset and rime, before they learn to read and spell. An important part of the argument is that children make analogies and inferences about these letter sequences in order to read and write new words.

Reading Practices with Deaf Learners

Author: Patricia L. McAnally
Publisher: Pro Ed
ISBN: 9781416401926
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This book was written specifically for professors and college students in teacher training programs for deaf education and for classroom teachers working with deaf and hard-of-hearing learners. It is one of the very few books on the market that focuses entirely on the hearing-impaired. It consists of three sections, each one providing in-depth information on topics critical to the teaching of reading to this specific population. * Section one: "Foundations" - contains chapters dealing with theory and research in such topics as: cognition, reading, language, literary development, vocabulary and comprehension. One chapter on ASL, English, and Reading looks at the research in the area of second-language learners and discusses its application to deaf and hard-of-hearing students. * Section two: "Instructional Management" - deals with instructional management and describes instructional systems and designs. These chapters look at current trends in education and how these trends apply to the education of students who are deaf and hard of hearing. * Section three: "Applications" - focuses on specific instructional models in reading, writing, and spelling, detailing strategies that have been successfully used with deaf and hard-of-hearing learners. The last chapter in this section discusses assessment, giving information, and examples of both formal and authentic procedures.

Diversity in Deaf Education

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190493070
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Deaf children are not hearing children who can't hear. Beyond any specific effects of hearing loss, as a group they are far more diverse than hearing peers. Lack of full access to language, incidental learning, and social interactions as well as the possibility of secondary disabilities means that deaf learners face a variety of challenges in academic domains. Technological innovations such as digital hearing aids and cochlear implants have improved hearing and the possibility of spoken language for many deaf learners, but parents, teachers, and other professionals are just now coming to recognize that there are cognitive, experiential, and social-emotional differences between deaf and hearing students likely to affect academic outcomes. Sign languages and schools and programs for deaf learners thus remain an important part of the continuum of services needed for this diverse population. Understanding such diversity and determining ways in which to accommodate them must become a top priority in educating deaf learners. Through the participation of an international, interdisciplinary set of scholars, Diversity in Deaf Education takes a broad view of learning and academic progress, considering "the whole child" in the context of the families, languages, educational settings in which they are immersed. In adopting this perspective, the complexities and commonalities in the social, emotional, cognitive, and linguistic mosaic of which the deaf child is a part, are captured. It is only through such a holistic consideration of diverse children developing within diverse settings that we can understand their academic potentials.