Literary Labyrinths in Franco Era Barcelona

Author: Colleen P. Culleton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317104595
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Bringing together works by Salvador Espriu, Juan Goytisolo, Mercè Rodoreda, Esther Tusquets, and Juan Marsa that portray memory as a disorienting narrative enterprise, Colleen Culleton argues that the source of this disorientation is the material reality of life in Barcelona in the immediate post-Civil War years. Barcelona was the object of harsh persecution in the first years of the Franco regime that included the erasure of marks of Catalan identity and cultural history from the urban landscape and made Barcelona a moving target for memory. The literature and film she examines show characters struggling to produce narratives of the remembered past that immediately conflict with the dominant version of Spain's historical narrative formulated to legitimize the Civil War. Culleton suggests the trope of the laberinto, used as an image or device in all five of the works she considers and translated into English as both maze and labyrinth, opens up a space that enables readers to take vulnerability to outside interference into account as an inseparable part of remembrance. While the narratives all have maze-like qualities involving a high level of reader participation and choice, the exigencies of the labyrinth with its unicursal demands for patience, perseverance, and faith always prevail. Thus do the Francoist narrative and social structure in the end resurface and reassert themselves over the narrating character's perspective.

Law Lawyering and Legal Education

Author: Charles Sampford
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317644662
Format: PDF
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Once a highly cosmopolitan profession, law was largely domesticated by the demands of the Westphalian state. But as the walls between sovereign states are lowered, law is globalizing in a way that is likely to change law, lawyering and legal education as much over the next 30 years – when the students entering law schools today reach the peak of their profession – as it has over the last 300. This book provides a sustained investigation of the theoretical and practical aspects of legal practice and education, synthesizing and developing nearly thirty years of Professor Sampford’s critical thought, analysis and academic leadership. The book features two major areas of investigation. First, it explains the significance of the ‘critical’, ‘theoretical’ and ‘ethical’ dimensions of legal education and legal practice in making more effective practitioners – placing ethics and values at the heart of the profession. Second, it explores the old/new challenges and opportunities for ethical lawyers. Challenges include those for lawyers working in large organisations dealing with issues from international tax minimisation to advising governments bent on war. Opportunities range from the capacity to give client’s ethical advice to playing a key role in the emergence of an international rule of law as they had to the ‘domestic’ rule of law. The book should stimulate great interest and occasional passion for legal practitioners, students, teachers and researchers of law, lawyering, legal practice and legal institutions. Its inter-disciplinary approaches should be of interest to those with interests in education theory, international relations, political science and government, professional ethics, sociology, public policy and governance studies.

Transnational Memory

Author: Chiara De Cesari
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
ISBN: 3110386739
Format: PDF
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How do memories circulate transnationally and to what effect? How can we understand the enduring role of national memories and their simultaneous reconfiguration under globalization? This book charts the rich production of memory across and beyond national borders, thus giving new insight into the role of memory in the contemporary world.

Decolonial Approaches to Latin American Literatures and Cultures

Author: Juan G. Ramos
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1349933589
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Decolonial Approaches to Latin American Literatures and Cultures engages and problematizes concepts such as “decolonial” and “coloniality” to question methodologies in literary and cultural scholarship. While the eleven contributions produce diverse approaches to literary and cultural texts ranging from Pre-Columbian to contemporary works, there is a collective questioning of the very idea of “Latin America,” what “Latin American” contains or leaves out, and the various practices and locations constituting Latinamericanism. This transdisciplinary study aims to open an evolving corpus of decolonial scholarship, providing a unique entry point into the literature and material culture produced from precolonial to contemporary times.

Making Ecuadorian Histories

Author: O. Hugo Benavides
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292702295
Format: PDF, ePub
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"This is one of the most outstanding books that I have read on Ecuador. . . . It is a groundbreaking work that intertwines nation, race, gender, and sexuality to show how that which seems most natural and most ancient is in fact intimately linked to the production of power." —Amalia Pallares, Assistant Professor of Political Science and Latin American Studies, University of Illinois, Chicago In Ecuador, as in all countries, archaeology and history play fundamental roles in defining national identity. Connecting with the prehistoric and historic pasts gives the modern state legitimacy and power. But the state is not the only actor that lays claim to the country's archaeological patrimony, nor is its official history the only version of the story. Indigenous peoples are increasingly drawing on the past to claim their rights and standing in the modern Ecuadorian state, while the press tries to present a "neutral" version of history that will satisfy its various publics. This pathfinding book investigates how archaeological knowledge is used for both maintaining and contesting nation-building and state-hegemony in Ecuador. Specifically, Hugo Benavides analyzes how the pre-Hispanic site of Cochasquí has become a source of competing narratives of Native American, Spanish, and Ecuadorian occupations, which serve the differing needs of the nation-state and different national populations at large. He also analyzes the Indian movement itself and the recent controversy over the final resting place for the traditional monolith of San Biritute. Offering a more nuanced view of the production of history than previous studies, Benavides demonstrates how both official and resistance narratives are constantly reproduced and embodied within the nation-state's dominant discourses.

Multiple Modernities

Author: Michelle Sharp
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1351697285
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This collection of essays confirms Carmen de Burgos's pivotal place in Spanish feminist history by bringing together eminent international scholars who offer new readings of Burgos's work. It includes the analyses of a number of lesser-known texts, both fictional and non-fictional, which give us a more comprehensive examination of Burgos's multipronge feminist approach. Burgos's works, especially her essays, are essential feminist reading and complement other European and North American traditions. Gaining familiarity with the breadth and depth of her work serves not only to provide an understanding of Spanish firstwave feminism, but also enriches our appreciation of cultural studies, gender studies, subaltern studies and travel literature. Looking at the entirety of her life and work, and the wide-ranging contributions in this volume, it is evident that Burgos embodied the tensions between tradition and modernity, depicting multiple representations of womanhood. Encouraging women to take ownership of their personal fashion, the design of their homes and the decorum of their families were steps towards recognizing a female population that was cognizant of its own desires.

The Story of Spanish

Author: Jean-Benoit Nadeau
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1250023165
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Just how did a dialect spoken by a handful of shepherds in Northern Spain become the world's second most spoken language, the official language of twenty-one countries on two continents, and the unofficial second language of the United States? Jean-Benoît Nadeau and Julie Barlow, the husband-and-wife team who chronicled the history of the French language in The Story of French, now look at the roots and spread of modern Spanish. Full of surprises and honed in Nadeau and Barlow's trademark style, combining personal anecdote, reflections, and deep research, The Story of Spanish is the first full biography of a language that shaped the world we know, and the only global language with two names—Spanish and Castilian. The story starts when the ancient Phoenicians set their sights on "The Land of the Rabbits," Spain's original name, which the Romans pronounced as Hispania. The Spanish language would pick up bits of Germanic culture, a lot of Arabic, and even some French on its way to taking modern form just as it was about to colonize a New World. Through characters like Queen Isabella, Christopher Columbus, Cervantes, and Goya, The Story of Spanish shows how Spain's Golden Age, the Mexican Miracle, and the Latin American Boom helped shape the destiny of the language. Other, more somber episodes, also contributed, like the Spanish Inquisition, the expulsion of Spain's Jews, the destruction of native cultures, the political instability in Latin America, and the dictatorship of Franco. The Story of Spanish shows there is much more to Spanish than tacos, flamenco, and bullfighting. It explains how the United States developed its Hispanic personality from the time of the Spanish conquistadors to Latin American immigration and telenovelas. It also makes clear how fundamentally Spanish many American cultural artifacts and customs actually are, including the dollar sign, barbecues, ranching, and cowboy culture. The authors give us a passionate and intriguing chronicle of a vibrant language that thrived through conquests and setbacks to become the tongue of Pedro Almodóvar and Gabriel García Márquez, of tango and ballroom dancing, of millions of Americans and hundreds of millions of people throughout the world.

Spanish Women Writers and Spain s Civil War

Author: Maryellen Bieder
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1134777167
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) pitted conservative forces including the army, the Church, the Falange (fascist party), landowners, and industrial capitalists against the Republic, installed in 1931 and supported by intellectuals, the petite bourgeoisie, many campesinos (farm laborers), and the urban proletariat. Provoking heated passions on both sides, the Civil War soon became an international phenomenon that inspired a number of literary works reflecting the impact of the war on foreign and national writers. While the literature of the period has been the subject of scholarship, women's literary production has not been studied as a body of work in the same way that literature by men has been, and its unique features have not been examined. Addressing this lacuna in literary studies, this volume provides fresh perspectives on well-known women writers, as well as less studied ones, whose works take the Spanish Civil War as a theme. The authors represented in this collection reflect a wide range of political positions. Writers such as Maria Zambrano, Mercè Rodoreda, and Josefina Aldecoa were clearly aligned with the Republic, whereas others, including Mercedes Salisachs and Liberata Masoliver, sympathized with the Nationalists. Most, however, are situated in a more ambiguous political space, although the ethics and character portraits that emerge in their works might suggest Republican sympathies. Taken together, the essays are an important contribution to scholarship on literature inspired by this pivotal point in Spanish history.

Latin American Technopoetics

Author: Scott Weintraub
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0429839391
Format: PDF
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Latin American Technopoetics: Scientific Explorations in New Media analyzes the ways in which poetry and multimedia installations by six prominent poets and artists engage, and in turn are engaged by, scientific discourses. In its innovative readings of contemporary digital media works, Latin American Technopoetics is the first book to investigate the powerful dialogue between recent techno-cultural phenomena, literature, and various scientific fields. This cutting-edge analysis of poetic and artistic experimentation—robots that compose and recite poetry, algorithms that create visualizations of poetic language or of the connections between everyday language and scientific terminology, arrays of multi-dimensional poetic spaces, and telematic and transgenic art—makes a strong case for the increasing viability of a scientific poetics currently gaining prominence in Latin American literary and media studies, digital humanities, and science and technology studies. Latin American Technopoetics is therefore a groundbreaking but highly-readable study of six of the most challenging Latin(o) American poets working at the interface of science and poetics, and proposes a new way to consider the question of techno-cultural modernity in Latin America.