Losing Ground

Author: David M. Burley
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 9781604734898
Format: PDF, Kindle
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What is it like to lose your front porch to the ocean? To watch saltwater destroy your favorite fishing holes? To see playgrounds and churches subside and succumb to brackish and rising water? The residents of coastal Louisiana know. For them hurricanes are but exclamation points in an incessant loss of coastal land now estimated to occur at a rate of at least twenty-four square miles per year. In Losing Ground, coastal Louisianans communicate the significance of place and environment. During interviews taken just before the 2005 hurricanes, they send out a plea to alleviate the damage. They speak with an urgency that exemplifies a fear of losing not just property and familiar surroundings, but their identity as well. People along Louisiana's southeastern coast hold a deep attachment to place, and this shows in the urgency of the narratives David M. Burley collects here. The meanings that residents attribute to coastal land loss reflect a tenuous and uprooted sense of self. The process of coastal land loss and all of its social components, from the familial to the political, impacts these residents' concepts of history and the future. Burley updates many of his subjects' narratives to reveal what has happened in the wake of the back-to-back disasters of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

Sustainable Coastal Design and Planning

Author: Elizabeth Mossop
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 0429856571
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This book aims to discuss contemporary ideas about planning and design for coastal resilience, how our thinking about the coast has changed to be far more dynamic and less stable, and to include a better understanding of the implications of climate change. Specifically, the book articulates what these ideas might mean when these are translated into real places through the examination of specific case studies. It will provide an alternative presentation of the issues and solutions and will examine strategies that work with natural processes to incorporate water into the urban environment, designing places and structures that can accommodate flooding and water storage.

Routledge Handbook of Environmental Displacement and Migration

Author: Robert McLeman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317272242
Format: PDF, ePub
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The last twenty years have seen a rapid increase in scholarly activity and publications dedicated to environmental migration and displacement, and the field has now reached a point in terms of profile, complexity, and sheer volume of reporting that a general review and assessment of existing knowledge and future research priorities is warranted. So far, such a product does not exist. The Routledge Handbook of Environmental Displacement and Migration provides a state-of-the-science review of research on how environmental variability and change influence current and future global migration patterns and, in some instances, trigger large-scale population displacements. Drawing together contributions from leading researchers in the field, this compendium will become a go-to guide for established and newly interested scholars, for government and policymaking entities, and for students and their instructors. It explains theoretical, conceptual, and empirical developments that have been made in recent years; describes their origins and connections to broader topics including migration research, development studies, and international public policy and law; and highlights emerging areas where new and/or additional research and reflection are warranted. The structure and the nature of the book allow the reader to quickly find a concise review relevant to conducting research or developing policy on particular topics, and to obtain a broad, reliable survey of what is presently known about the subject.

Seeking Justice in an Energy Sacrifice Zone

Author: Julie K. Maldonado
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351002929
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Seeking Justice in an Energy Sacrifice Zone is an ethnographic examination of the lived experience of rapid environmental change in coastal Louisiana, USA. Writing from a political ecology perspective, Maldonado explores the effects of changes to localized climate and ecology on the Isle de Jean Charles, Grand Caillou/Dulac, and Pointe-au-Chien Indian Tribes. Focusing in particular on wide ranging displacement effects, she argues that changes to climate and ecology should not be viewed in isolation as just physical processes but as part of wider socio-political contexts. Seeking Justice in an Energy Sacrifice Zone is useful reading for students of environmental anthropology, as well as those taking other environmental and socio-political courses.

Nature s Burdens

Author: Daniel Nelson
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
ISBN: 1607325705
Format: PDF, ePub
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Nature’s Burdens is a political and intellectual history of American natural resource conservation from the 1980s into the twenty-first century—a period of intense political turmoil, shifting priorities among federal policymakers, and changing ideas about the goals of conservation. Telling a story of persistent activism, conflict, and frustration but also of striking achievement, it is an account of how new ideas and policies regarding human relationships to plants, animals, and their surroundings have become vital features of modern environmentalism. In the 1960s and 1970s, Congress embraced the largely dormant movement to preserve distinctive landscapes and the growing demand for outdoor recreation, establishing an unprecedented number of parks, monuments, and recreation areas. The election of Ronald Reagan and a shift to a Republican-controlled Senate brought this activity to an abrupt halt and introduced a period of intense partisanship and legislative gridlock that extends to the present. In this political climate, three developments largely defined the role of conservation in contemporary society: environmental organizations have struggled to defend the legal status quo, private land conservation has become increasingly important, and the emergence of potent scientific voices has promoted the protection of animals and plants and injected a new sense of urgency into the larger cause. These developments mark this period as a distinctive and important chapter in the history of American conservation. Scrupulously researched, scientifically and politically well informed, concise, and accessibly written, Nature’s Burdens is the most comprehensive examination of recent efforts to protect and enhance the natural world. It will be of interest to environmental historians, environmental activists, and any general reader interested in conservation.