Lost in Ireland

Author: Cindy Callaghan
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1481462083
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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After breaking a chain letter, can superstitious Megan find a way to turn her luck around? Meghan McGlinchey is the most superstitious girl in her family—and probably in the entire state of Delaware. When she receives a chain letter from a stranger in Ireland, Meghan immediately passes it on, taking only a tiny shortcut in the directions. But after a disastrous day, made complete by losing the election for class president and embarrassing herself in front of the entire school, Meghan realizes that tiny shortcut was a big mistake. Thankfully, her family was already headed to Ireland on spring break, and Meghan makes it her mission to find the original sender and break her extremely unlucky streak. With the help of an eccentric cast of characters—and one very cute Irish boy—can Meghan figure out a way to stop her bad luck? Or is she cursed forever?

Lost Ireland

Author: William Derham
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781566493154
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Lost Ireland: 1860 1960 presents a panoramic sweep of Ireland s forgotten built heritage. From war and insurrection, to prosperity and development, the changes wrought by history have meant that a whole swathe of our built past no longer survives, save through the magic of the camera lens. Drawing on a variety of photographic archives, this book offers a wide sample of what was lost to these changes: the humble mud huts of the transient labourer, and the thatched mansions of the prosperous farmer; the edifices of industrial innovation and technology; the grand homes of the well-to-do, including the infamous big house .Organized by county, Lost Ireland reveals a layer of Irish history which is both fascinating and nostalgic, not just in its bricks and mortar but also in the events and the people who inhabited those settings."

Ireland Small Open Economies and European Integration

Author: D. Begg
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137559608
Format: PDF, Docs
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David Begg examines how four small open economies- Finland, Denmark, the Netherlands and Ireland- have managed the stresses and strains of Europeanisation since the single market came into being, and as fault lines begin to appear within the European integration project. In particular, he drills down into the Irish Polity to see how its institutions have engaged with Europe and how decisions on critical issues like integration, EMU and Social Partnership were reached. He finds that both Ireland and Europe are at a critical juncture for different but interconnected reasons, and identifies the options that are available to them.

The Lost Distilleries of Ireland

Author: Brian Townsend
Publisher: Neil Wilson Publishing
ISBN: 1906000093
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Scotch may be the most popular whisky in the world today, but over a century ago, it was Irish whiskey which was most commonly drunk throughout the world. At the time of writing only three producing units exist at Midleton, Co Cork; Bushmills, Co Antrim and Cooley at Dundalk, Co Louth. In this book, Brian Townsend has meticulously researched the lost distilleries of Ireland and details what happened to them. In part I, he relates the origins of distilling in Ireland (an Arabic hand-down to Irish monks); the links with Scotland; the wild years when illicit distilling was rampant and shebeens proliferated as corruption increased; the coming of legitimacy and temperance; the development of the Coffey still (which ultimately helped to sink the industry); the golden years; and, prohibition in the USA and the emergence of the Free State in 1922. In part II, each distillery is listed and accompanied with archive photos and etchings. The list will include: Bow Street, John's Lane, Thomas Street, Marrowbone Lane, Jones Road and Phoenix Park (all Dublin); Monasterevan, Co Kildare; Tullamore, Brusna and Birr (all Co Offaly); Nun's Island, Galway; Limerick, Co Limerick; North Mall, Cork; Midleton, Glen and Bandon (all Co Cork); Bishop's Water, Wexford; Dundalk, Co Louth; Royal Irish, Avoniel and Irish, Belfast; Upper and Lower, Comber, Co Down; and, Coleraine and Limavady, Co Londonderry and Abbey Street and Waterside, Londonderry. Black and white contemporary and archive photographs accompany the text.

Was It For This

Author: John Waters
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1446486850
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Ireland today stands at a defining moment. The prosperity of the Celtic Tiger years has given way to the sudden crash, the turbulence of the euro crisis, and the loss of our sovereignty to the faceless technocrats of Europe and the IMF. Our leaders seem impotent and rage, bewilderment and despair have swept through Irish society. Was It For This...? delves into the Irish psyche to answer the questions: What happened to our hopes and dreams? What is at the heart of the sense of betrayal that we feel? In the rush to modernity, did we throw away everything of true value? Have we lost the ideals of nationhood and patriotism set out by those who dreamt of the Irish Republic? John Waters’ remarkable new book sweeps through the pages of our recent history to get to the heart our political, social and existential identity crisis. Ranging across a vast canvas, Was It For This...? argues that the Celtic Tiger was built on a collective delusion, and that the seeds of its destruction were sown many years before it even began, when we exchanged our colonial shackles for a no-less destructive dependency for short-term gain. Ireland’s sovereignty was given up long before the IMF came to town. Along the way, Waters ponders our love/hate relationship with Fianna Fáil; the undercurrents that ran through the 2011 presidential election; why our political leaders and commentators have clung onto the remnants of 1960s revolutionary fervour long after the revolution was won; how our denial of an authoritative father figure has led to a leaderless ‘sibling society’; the emptiness of our ‘youth culture’ and the suppression of real thought and discussion through cynicism and irony; and why we have lost the very language that once enabled us to speak of ‘Ireland’ with pride.

The Lost Laws of Ireland

Author: Catherine Duggan
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781908689214
Format: PDF
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The ancient laws of Celtic Ireland were used from the time before Patrick until the 17th century when they were outlawed and disappeared. Crafted by judges, known as Brehons, the laws were surprisingly modern in their approach to timeless issues and reflect a complex and sophisticated society. This book gives an outline of the main features of the laws and their history, and ultimately focuses on certain themes that are significant to the modern reader, such as equity and fairness, transparent legal process and women's rights. Many of the legal manuscripts have been lost or destroyed and the laws were not translated into English until modern times. As a result, they have mostly remained obscure and unstudied. Only recently have they given up their secrets. The ancient laws provide a window into society in early Ireland where learning was revered, social mobility was expected and fairness and harmony were social goals. Their resilience demonstrates their value and effectiveness. The Brehon legal system came to an end officially in 1605 after enduring for over a thousand years.

Ireland for Beginners Or Get Lost in Ireland

Author: Besley
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781897784167
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This humorous, spoof guide by cartoonist Rupert Besley leaves no shamrock unturned as he reveals the Ireland of shebeens, saints, hurling and banshees in this humorous guide.

Lost in Rome

Author: Cindy Callaghan
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1481442821
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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When Lucy heads to Rome for the summer, she’s is in for pizza, pasta, and a little amore in this M!X novel from the author of Lost in London. Lucia “Lucy” Rossi thought she was going to be a camp counselor for the summer, but, thanks to a very fortunate twist, she ends up in Rome, Italy, helping out at her aunt’s restaurant, Amore Pizzeria. Lucy can’t wait to see some ruins, eat all the gelato she can, and maybe say a few buongiornos to some cute Italian boys. But Lucy arrives to Italian trouble. Her aunt is in danger of losing her business, thanks to a flashy new pizzeria down the road that is all style, but no substance. In order to try and save the shop, Lucy decides to employ a very unique version of matchmaking—making matches based on customer’s pizza preferences. Soon, word of the American matchmaker gets out, and it looks like the business might be saved! Or so she thought—until someone decides to try and sabotage the newfound success of Amore pizza. Can Lucy figure out who might be behind everything? Or will her family being saying ciao to Amore Pizzeria for good?

The Lost Painting

Author: Jonathan Harr
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 9781588364890
Format: PDF
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An Italian village on a hilltop near the Adriatic coast, a decaying palazzo facing the sea, and in the basement, cobwebbed and dusty, lit by a single bulb, an archive unknown to scholars. Here, a young graduate student from Rome, Francesca Cappelletti, makes a discovery that inspires a search for a work of art of incalculable value, a painting lost for almost two centuries. The artist was Caravaggio, a master of the Italian Baroque. He was a genius, a revolutionary painter, and a man beset by personal demons. Four hundred years ago, he drank and brawled in the taverns and streets of Rome, moving from one rooming house to another, constantly in and out of jail, all the while painting works of transcendent emotional and visual power. He rose from obscurity to fame and wealth, but success didn’t alter his violent temperament. His rage finally led him to commit murder, forcing him to flee Rome a hunted man. He died young, alone, and under strange circumstances. Caravaggio scholars estimate that between sixty and eighty of his works are in existence today. Many others–no one knows the precise number–have been lost to time. Somewhere, surely, a masterpiece lies forgotten in a storeroom, or in a small parish church, or hanging above a fireplace, mistaken for a mere copy. Prizewinning author Jonathan Harr embarks on an spellbinding journey to discover the long-lost painting known as The Taking of Christ–its mysterious fate and the circumstances of its disappearance have captivated Caravaggio devotees for years. After Francesca Cappelletti stumbles across a clue in that dusty archive, she tracks the painting across a continent and hundreds of years of history. But it is not until she meets Sergio Benedetti, an art restorer working in Ireland, that she finally manages to assemble all the pieces of the puzzle. Told with consummate skill by the writer of the bestselling, award-winning A Civil Action, The Lost Painting is a remarkable synthesis of history and detective story. The fascinating details of Caravaggio’s strange, turbulent career and the astonishing beauty of his work come to life in these pages. Harr’s account is not unlike a Caravaggio painting: vivid, deftly wrought, and enthralling. ". . . Jonathan Harr has gone to the trouble of writing what will probably be a bestseller . . . rich and wonderful. . .in truth, the book reads better than a thriller because, unlike a lot of best-selling nonfiction authors who write in a more or less novelistic vein (Harr's previous book, A Civil Action, was made into a John Travolta movie), Harr doesn't plump up hi tale. He almost never foreshadows, doesn't implausibly reconstruct entire conversations and rarely throws in litanies of clearly conjectured or imagined details just for color's sake. . .if you're a sucker for Rome, and for dusk. . .[you'll] enjoy Harr's more clearly reported details about life in the city, as when--one of my favorite moments in the whole book--Francesca and another young colleague try to calm their nerves before a crucial meeting with a forbidding professor by eating gelato. And who wouldn't in Italy? The pleasures of travelogue here are incidental but not inconsiderable." --The New York Times Book Review "Jonathan Harr has taken the story of the lost painting, and woven from it a deeply moving narrative about history, art and taste--and about the greed, envy, covetousness and professional jealousy of people who fall prey to obsession. It is as perfect a work of narrative nonfiction as you could ever hope to read." --The Economist From the Hardcover edition.

The Downfall of the Spanish Armada in Ireland

Author: Ken Douglas
Publisher: Gill & Macmillan Ltd
ISBN: 0717151492
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The English navy inflicted a narrow defeat on the Armada, but it was the Irish coast that encompassed its downfall. 'Heed that coast!' The Duke of Medina Sidonia wanted only to guide La Felissima Armada home safely. In the North Sea he issued sailing instructions, which, if they had been followed, would have given the Armada a safety margin of at least 300 miles. He particularly ordered them to '...take great heed lest you fall upon the island of Ireland for fear of the harm that may happen unto you upon that coast.' They were in no doubt that Ireland was to be avoided. His words proved to be more than a warning: they were a prophecy, which was inexorably fulfilled. A siren of alluring beauty, the Irish coast also conceals deadly danger. Destiny was to conspire to transform it into an instrument of terrible destruction and tragic loss of life. In the Atlantic the Armada encountered continuous southerly winds and unknown ocean currents. It was two centuries before it became possible to calculate longitude at sea, and they were unaware that they had not sailed far enough westwards to give themselves the prescribed safety margin. They became separated and lost, and when they at last turned southwards, scattered groups unintentionally descended on Ireland, arriving at fourteen different locations from Donegal to Kerry. Many found shelter, but a few were lost. But on 21 September 1588 fourteen ships were destroyed by hurricane force winds: the only occasion during the entire voyage when ships were completely destroyed by the weather. 'A most extreme and cruel storm' the Irish described it. The Spanish recorded that 'in the morning it began to blow from the west with a most terrible fury, bright and with little rain.' Ships that had stayed at sea survived. In Donegal Bay the galleass Girona had sheltered with about 1,000 men. In October, Don Alonso de Leyva arrived with almost 1,000 more. His entourage included young men from all the noble families of Spain. After being repaired, the Girona departed for Scotland at the end of October, overloaded with 1,300 survivors. She so nearly got there, but foundered near the Giant's Causeway with the loss of de Leyva and the flower of Spanish nobility. In all, 24 Spanish ships were lost in Ireland and about 5,000 men died, far greater losses than had been suffered in the English Channel. The English navy inflicted a narrow defeat on the Armada, but it was the Irish coast that encompassed its downfall. Long before it had been surveyed and charted, when it was almost as unknown to mariners as the surface of the moon, for a few brief months in the autumn of 1588, the Irish coast was caught in the headlights of history.