Making Civics Count

Author: David E. Campbell
Publisher: Harvard Education Press
ISBN: 1612504787
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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"By nearly every measure, Americans are less engaged in their communities and political activity than generations past.” So write the editors of this volume, who survey the current practices and history of citizenship education in the United States. They argue that the current period of “creative destruction”—when schools are closing and opening in response to reform mandates—is an ideal time to take an in-depth look at how successful strategies and programs promote civic education and good citizenship. Making Civics Count offers research-based insights into what diverse students and teachers know and do as civic actors, and proposes a blueprint for civic education for a new generation that is both practical and visionary.

Civic Education

Author: Richard G. Niemi
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300107449
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This important book takes a fresh look at what America's high school seniors know about government and politics and how they learn it. In this timely and persuasive book, Niemi and Junn provide the best evidence to date that civic education does make a difference in political learning and that certain curricular aspects facilitate that learning. First rate. -- M. Kent Jennings, UCSB

Teaching America

Author: David Feith
Publisher: R&L Education
ISBN: 1607098407
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This book taps the best American thinkers to answer the essential American question: How do we sustain our experiment in government of, by, and for the people? To remain America, our country has to give its kids a civic identity, an understanding of our constitutional system, and some appreciation of the amazing achievement of American self-government. Yet schools often do no such thing. Young Americans know little about the founding fathers, the Bill of Rights, the structure of government, or the civilrights movement. Three of every four high-school seniors aren't proficient in civics, and the problem is aggravated by universities' disregard for civic education. This undermines healthy citizenship. It disenfranchises would-be voters-especially the poorand minorities-it weakens America's common culture, and it poisons political discourse. That is the subject of this book, authored by an extraordinary and politically diverse roster of public officials, scholars, and educators. In these pages, they describe our nation's civic education problem, assess its causes, offer an agenda for reform, and explain the high stakes at risk if we fail.

The Demands of Liberal Education

Author: Meira Levinson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198295448
Format: PDF
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The Demands of Liberal Education analyses and applies contemporary liberal political theory to certain key problems within the field of educational theory. Levinson examines problems centred around determining appropriate educational aims, content and institutional structure and argues that liberal governments should exercise a much greater control over education than they now do. Combining theoretical with empirical research, this book will interest and provoke scholars,policy makers, educators, parents, and all citizens interested in education politics.

Why We Vote

Author: David E. Campbell
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400837618
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Why do more people vote--or get involved in other civic and political activities--in some communities than in others? Why We Vote demonstrates that our communities shape our civic and political engagement, and that schools are especially significant communities for fostering strong civic norms. Much of the research on political participation has found that levels of participation are higher in diverse communities where issues important to voters are hotly contested. In this well-argued book, David Campbell finds support for this view, but also shows that homogenous communities often have very high levels of civic participation despite a lack of political conflict. Campbell maintains that this sense of civic duty springs not only from one's current social environment, but also from one's early influences. The degree to which people feel a sense of civic obligation stems, in part, from their adolescent experience. Being raised and thus socialized in a community with strong civic norms leads people to be civically engaged in adulthood. Campbell demonstrates how the civic norms within one's high school impact individuals' civic involvement--even a decade and a half after those individuals have graduated. Efforts within America's high schools to enhance young people's sense of civic responsibility could have a participatory payoff in years to come, the book concludes; thus schools would do well to focus more attention on building civic norms among their students.

Civic Education in the Elementary Grades

Author: Dana Mitra
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 080777345X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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As former elementary school teachers, the authors focus on what is possible in schools rather than a romantic vision of what schools could be. Based on a 5-year study of an elementary school, this book shows how civic engagement can be purposive and critical—a way to encourage young people to examine their environment, to notice and question injustices, and to take action to make a difference in their communities and school. Focusing on the intersection of student voice and critical inquiry, the book describes how to embed civic engagement into curriculum, school decision-making processes, and whole-school activities. Chapters provide an overview of what research has demonstrated about civic engagement at the classroom, school, and community levels, including detailed descriptions of activities and lessons for practice. Classroom teachers, school principals, community members, and teacher educators can use this resource to foster a deeper, richer understanding of what is entailed in civic life. Book Features: A vivid portrait of a “typical” public school that wants to do more than teach to the test.An examination of the conditions that enable young people to participate in democratic practices, including identifying and questioning injustices.Concrete examples of student voice and critical inquiry in classroom contexts.Practices and activities that encourage children to get along with others, exchange perspectives, and work across differences. “Offers a suggestive range of evidence that high-quality civic engagement initiatives can enhance students’ academic, social, and emotional engagement. . . . It reveals the nitty-gritty of how experienced teachers can enable children who are immersed in meaningful civic work also to engage more deeply with mathematical problem-solving, peer collaboration, literacy and social studies learning, and development of empathy and mutual trust.” —From the Foreword by Meira Levinson “Mitra and Serriere show us not only that elementary-aged children are capable of civic engagement, but how such engagement can be nurtured in the classroom. Children can be active civic participants; this book demonstrates both the power of this idea and how we might accomplish this essential task.” —Beth C. Rubin, Rutgers University

Civic Education in the Twenty First Century

Author: Michael T. Rogers
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739193503
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Imagine an America where governmental institutions, schools, new technologies, and interest groups work together to promote more informed citizens. Civic Education in the Twenty-First Century brings together the research of scholars from various disciplines to show that by expanding what is done in isolation, we can realize such a healthy civic ecology.

Curriculum and Teaching Dialogue

Author: David J. Flinders
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1623968089
Format: PDF, Docs
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Curriculum and Teaching Dialogue (CTD) is a publication of the American Association of Teaching and Curriculum (AATC), a national learned society for the scholarly fields of teaching and curriculum. The fields includes those working on the theory, design and evaluation of educational programs at large. University faculty members identified with this field are typically affiliated with the departments of curriculum and instruction, teacher education, educational foundations, elementary education, secondary education, and higher education. CTD promotes all analytical and interpretive approaches that are appropriate for the scholarly study of teaching and curriculum. In fulfillment of this mission, CTD addresses a range of issues across the broad fields of educational research and policy for all grade levels and types of educational programs.

Journal of Character Education Issue

Author: Jacques S. Benninga
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1641130539
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The Journal of Character Education is the only professional journal in education devoted to character education. It is designed to cover the field—from the latest research to applied best practices. We include original research reports, editorials and conceptual articles by the best minds in our field, reviews of latest books, and other relevant strategies and manuscripts by educators that describe best practices in teaching and learning related to character education. The Journal of Character Education has for over a decade been the sole scholarly journal focused on research, theory, measurement, and practice of character education. This issue includes four empirical articles and a practitioner’s voice section. Topics covered in this issue include different approaches to character education in the classroom (e.g., after school, reading strategies), applications to cheating, and teacher preparation.

The Charged Classroom

Author: Judith L. Pace
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317816625
Format: PDF, Mobi
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At a time when debate over school reform commands unprecedented attention, Judith L. Pace argues we must grapple with the underlying challenges of classroom teaching and, at the same time, strive to realize the ideals of democratic education. Building on three qualitative studies in grades four through twelve, The Charged Classroom examines the deeply embedded tensions, escalating pressures, and exciting possibilities of the contemporary American public school classroom. Through detailed descriptions and analyses of social studies and English language arts classrooms, Pace disentangles how teachers and students navigate three charged arenas: academic expectations, discussion of provocative topics, and curricular demands. In each domain, democratic learning opportunities, such as promotion of positive student identity, dialogue across differences, and exploration of conflict, are both opened up and closed down. A passionate and persuasive call for education reform, the book offers crucial insights about the realities of teaching and key recommendations for advancing democratic education in a multicultural society.