Making Good Neighbors

Author: Abigail Perkiss
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801470846
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In the 1950s and 1960s, as the white residents, real estate agents, and municipal officials of many American cities fought keep African Americans out of traditionally white neighborhoods, Philadelphia’s West Mount Airy became one of the first neighborhoods in the nation where residents came together around a community-wide mission toward intentional integration. As West Mount Airy experienced transition, homeowners fought economic and legal policies that encouraged white flight and threatened the quality of local schools, seeking to find an alternative to racial separation without knowing what they would create in its place. In Making Good Neighbors, Abigail Perkiss tells the remarkable story of West Mount Airy, drawing on archival research and her oral history interviews with residents to trace their efforts, which began in the years following World War II and continued through the turn of the twenty-first century. The organizing principles of neighborhood groups like the West Mount Airy Neighbors Association (WMAN) were fundamentally liberal and emphasized democracy, equality, and justice; the social, cultural, and economic values of these groups were also decidedly grounded in middle-class ideals and white-collar professionalism. As Perkiss shows, this liberal, middle-class framework would ultimately become contested by more militant black activists and from within WMAN itself, as community leaders worked to adapt and respond to the changing racial landscape of the 1960s and 1970s. The West Mount Airy case stands apart from other experiments in integration because of the intentional, organized, and long-term commitment on the part of WMAN to biracial integration and, in time, multiracial and multiethnic diversity. The efforts of residents in the 1950s and 1960s helped to define the neighborhood as it exists today.

Blue Collar Conservatism

Author: Timothy J. Lombardo
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812295439
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The postwar United States has experienced many forms of populist politics, none more consequential than that of the blue-collar white ethnics who brought figures like Ronald Reagan and Donald Trump to the White House. Blue-Collar Conservatism traces the rise of this little-understood, easily caricatured variant of populism by presenting a nuanced portrait of the supporters of Philadelphia Mayor Frank Rizzo. In 1971, Frank Rizzo became the first former police commissioner elected mayor of a major American city. Despite serving as a Democrat, Rizzo cultivated his base of support by calling for "law and order" and opposing programs like public housing, school busing, affirmative action, and other policies his supporters deemed unearned advantages for nonwhites. Out of this engagement with the interwoven politics of law enforcement, school desegregation, equal employment, and urban housing, Timothy J. Lombardo argues, blue-collar populism arose. Based on extensive archival research, and with an emphasis on interrelated changes to urban space and blue-collar culture, Blue-Collar Conservatism challenges the familiar backlash narrative, instead contextualizing blue-collar politics within postwar urban and economic crises. Historian and Philadelphia-native Lombardo demonstrates how blue-collar whites did not immediately abandon welfare liberalism but instead selectively rejected liberal policies based on culturally defined ideas of privilege, disadvantage, identity, and entitlement. While grounding his analysis in the postwar era's familiar racial fissures, Lombardo also emphasizes class identity as an indispensable driver of blue-collar political engagement. Blue-Collar Conservatism ultimately shows how this combination of factors created one of the least understood but most significant political developments in recent American history.

Upending the Ivory Tower

Author: Stefan M. Bradley
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479819271
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The inspiring story of the black students, faculty, and administrators who forever changed America’s leading educational institutions and paved the way for social justice and racial progress The eight elite institutions that comprise the Ivy League, sometimes known as the Ancient Eight—Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Brown, Dartmouth, and Cornell—are American stalwarts that have profoundly influenced history and culture by producing the nation’s and the world’s leaders. The few black students who attended Ivy League schools in the decades following WWII not only went on to greatly influence black America and the nation in general, but unquestionably awakened these most traditional and selective of American spaces. In the twentieth century, black youth were in the vanguard of the black freedom movement and educational reform. Upending the Ivory Tower illuminates how the Black Power movement, which was borne out of an effort to edify the most disfranchised of the black masses, also took root in the hallowed halls of America’s most esteemed institutions of higher education. Between the close of WWII and 1975, the civil rights and Black Power movements transformed the demographics and operation of the Ivy League on and off campus. As desegregators and racial pioneers, black students, staff, and faculty used their status in the black intelligentsia to enhance their predominantly white institutions while advancing black freedom. Although they were often marginalized because of their race and class, the newcomers altered educational policies and inserted blackness into the curricula and culture of the unabashedly exclusive and starkly white schools. This book attempts to complete the narrative of higher education history, while adding a much needed nuance to the history of the Black Power movement. It tells the stories of those students, professors, staff, and administrators who pushed for change at the risk of losing what privilege they had. Putting their status, and sometimes even their lives, in jeopardy, black activists negotiated, protested, and demonstrated to create opportunities for the generations that followed. The enrichments these change agents made endure in the diversity initiatives and activism surrounding issues of race that exist in the modern Ivy League. Upending the Ivory Tower not only informs the civil rights and Black Power movements of the postwar era but also provides critical context for the Black Lives Matter movement that is growing in the streets and on campuses throughout the country today. As higher education continues to be a catalyst for change, there is no one better to inform today’s activists than those who transformed our country’s past and paved the way for its future.

Chicago s Block Clubs

Author: Amanda I. Seligman
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022638599X
Format: PDF, ePub
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What do you do if your alley is strewn with garbage after the sanitation truck comes through? Or if you’re tired of the rowdy teenagers next door keeping you up all night? Is there a vacant lot on your block accumulating weeds, needles, and litter? For a century, Chicagoans have joined block clubs to address problems like these that make daily life in the city a nuisance. When neighbors work together in block clubs, playgrounds get built, local crime is monitored, streets are cleaned up, and every summer is marked by the festivities of day-long block parties. In Chicago’s Block Clubs, Amanda I. Seligman uncovers the history of the block club in Chicago—from its origins in the Urban League in the early 1900s through to the Chicago Police Department’s twenty-first-century community policing program. Recognizing that many neighborhood problems are too big for one resident to handle—but too small for the city to keep up with—city residents have for more than a century created clubs to establish and maintain their neighborhood’s particular social dynamics, quality of life, and appearance. Omnipresent yet evanescent, block clubs are sometimes the major outlets for community organizing in the city—especially in neighborhoods otherwise lacking in political strength and clout. Drawing on the stories of hundreds of these groups from across the city, Seligman vividly illustrates what neighbors can—and cannot—accomplish when they work together.

The Fight for Fair Housing

Author: Gregory D. Squires
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134822871
Format: PDF, Docs
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The federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 was passed in a time of turmoil, conflict, and often conflagration in cities across the nation. It took the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to finally secure its passage. The Kerner Commission warned in 1968 that "to continue present policies is to make permanent the division of our country into two societies; one largely Negro and poor, located in the central cities; the other, predominantly white and affluent, located in the suburbs and outlying areas". The Fair Housing Act was passed with a dual mandate: to end discrimination and to dismantle the segregated living patterns that characterized most cities. The Fight for Fair Housing tells us what happened, why, and what remains to be done. Since the passage of the Fair Housing Act, the many forms of housing discrimination and segregation, and associated consequences, have been documented. At the same time, significant progress has been made in counteracting discrimination and promoting integration. Few suburbs today are all white; many people of color are moving to the suburbs; and some white families are moving back to the city. Unfortunately, discrimination and segregation persist. The Fight for Fair Housing brings together the nation’s leading fair housing activists and scholars (many of whom are in both camps) to tell the stories that led to the passage of the Fair Housing Act, its consequences, and the implications of the act going forward. Including an afterword by Walter Mondale, this book is intended for everyone concerned with the future of our cities and equal access for all persons to housing and related opportunities.

Lady sings the Blues

Author: Billie Holiday
Publisher: Edition Nautilus
ISBN: 3960541643
Format: PDF, Docs
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Die Autobiografie der legendären Jazzsängerin Billie Holiday! "Man hat mir gesagt, dass niemand das Wort ›Hunger‹ so singt wie ich. Genauso das Wort ›Liebe‹. Vielleicht liegt das daran, dass ich weiß, was diese Worte bedeuten. Vielleicht liegt das daran, dass ich stolz genug bin, mich an all das erinnern zu wollen, an Baltimore und Welfare Island, das katholische Heim und das Jefferson-Gericht, an den Sheriff vor unserm Haus in Harlem und die Städte in ganz Amerika, wo ich meine Beulen und Narben abbekommen habe, Philadelphia und Alderson, Hollywood und San Francisco, an jede Kleinigkeit. Alle Cadillacs und Nerze der Welt - und ich hatte von beiden schon einige - können das nicht aufwiegen oder vergessen machen. Alles was ich je von den Menschen gelernt habe, liegt in diesen beiden Worten. Zuerst braucht man etwas zu essen und ein bisschen Liebe, bevor man sich die Predigt von irgendjemandem über richtiges Verhalten anhören kann. Alles, was ich bin und was ich vom Leben will, sagen diese beiden Wörter."

Liberalismus

Author: Ludwig Mises
Publisher: Ludwig von Mises Institute
ISBN: 1933550864
Format: PDF, ePub
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Das j dische Jahrhundert

Author: Yuri Slezkine
Publisher: Ruprecht Gmbh & Company
ISBN: 9783525362907
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Mit "Das jüdische Jahrhundert" hat Yuri Slezkine ein Meisterwerk der historischen Essayistik vorgelegt. Er verbindet historische und anthropologische Ansätze, indem er die Frage nach dem Verhältnis von Judentum und Moderne universalisiert. Dabei bezeichnet er den Habitus jüdischer Lebenswelten als "merkurianisch", den der agrarischen Bevölkerung als "apollonisch". Im Zuge der Moderne, so Slezkine, verwandelten sich immer mehr Menschen in Merkurianer, sie werden gleichsam zu "Juden". Von diesen Fragestellungen und Metaphorisierungen der Soziologie um 1900 ausgehend zeigt das Buch die Alternativen auf, die den Juden um diese Zeit offen standen. Dabei rückt das revolutionäre Russland in den Mittelpunkt der Analyse. Die große Leistung Slezkines ist es, in einer sowohl nüchternen als auch ironischen Weise die Präsenz von Juden in den zentralen Bereichen des Sowjetregimes zu erklären. Er verweist auf die Attribute ihrer Modernität, ohne dem antisemitischen Diskurs über Juden und Bolschewismus zu folgen. Sozial-, Mentalitäts- und Literaturgeschichte verbindend gelingt es Slezkine, die paradigmatische jüdische Erfahrung im 20. Jahrhundert provokant und spannend nachzuzeichnen.

The New Jim Crow

Author: Michelle Alexander
Publisher: Antje Kunstmann
ISBN: 3956141598
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Die Wahl von Barack Obama im November 2008 markierte einen historischen Wendepunkt in den USA: Der erste schwarze Präsident schien für eine postrassistische Gesellschaft und den Triumph der Bürgerrechtsbewegung zu stehen. Doch die Realität in den USA ist eine andere. Obwohl die Rassentrennung, die in den sogenannten Jim-Crow-Gesetzen festgeschrieben war, im Zuge der Bürgerrechtsbewegung abgeschafft wurde, sitzt heute ein unfassbar hoher Anteil der schwarzen Bevölkerung im Gefängnis oder ist lebenslang als kriminell gebrandmarkt. Ein Status, der die Leute zu Bürgern zweiter Klasse macht, indem er sie ihrer grundsätzlichsten Rechte beraubt – ganz ähnlich den explizit rassistischen Diskriminierungen der Jim-Crow-Ära. In ihrem Buch, das in Amerika eine breite Debatte ausgelöst hat, argumentiert Michelle Alexander, dass die USA ihr rassistisches System nach der Bürgerrechtsbewegung nicht abgeschafft, sondern lediglich umgestaltet haben. Da unter dem perfiden Deckmantel des »War on Drugs« überproportional junge männliche Schwarze und ihre Communities kriminalisiert werden, funktioniert das drakonische Strafjustizsystem der USA heute wie das System rassistischer Kontrolle von gestern: ein neues Jim Crow.