Making Good Neighbors

Author: Abigail Perkiss
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801470846
Format: PDF, ePub
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In the 1950s and 1960s, as the white residents, real estate agents, and municipal officials of many American cities fought keep African Americans out of traditionally white neighborhoods, Philadelphia’s West Mount Airy became one of the first neighborhoods in the nation where residents came together around a community-wide mission toward intentional integration. As West Mount Airy experienced transition, homeowners fought economic and legal policies that encouraged white flight and threatened the quality of local schools, seeking to find an alternative to racial separation without knowing what they would create in its place. In Making Good Neighbors, Abigail Perkiss tells the remarkable story of West Mount Airy, drawing on archival research and her oral history interviews with residents to trace their efforts, which began in the years following World War II and continued through the turn of the twenty-first century. The organizing principles of neighborhood groups like the West Mount Airy Neighbors Association (WMAN) were fundamentally liberal and emphasized democracy, equality, and justice; the social, cultural, and economic values of these groups were also decidedly grounded in middle-class ideals and white-collar professionalism. As Perkiss shows, this liberal, middle-class framework would ultimately become contested by more militant black activists and from within WMAN itself, as community leaders worked to adapt and respond to the changing racial landscape of the 1960s and 1970s. The West Mount Airy case stands apart from other experiments in integration because of the intentional, organized, and long-term commitment on the part of WMAN to biracial integration and, in time, multiracial and multiethnic diversity. The efforts of residents in the 1950s and 1960s helped to define the neighborhood as it exists today.

Making Good Neighbors

Author: Abigail Perkiss
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781501713637
Format: PDF, ePub
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Abigail Perkiss tells the remarkable story of West Mount Airy, drawing on archival research and her oral history interviews with residents of this purposefully integrated Philadelphia neighborhood.

Philadelphia Divided

Author: James Wolfinger
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807878101
Format: PDF
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In a detailed study of life and politics in Philadelphia between the 1930s and the 1950s, James Wolfinger demonstrates how racial tensions in working-class neighborhoods and job sites shaped the contours of mid-twentieth-century liberal and conservative politics. As racial divisions fractured the working class, he argues, Republican leaders exploited these racial fissures to reposition their party as the champion of ordinary white citizens besieged by black demands and overwhelmed by liberal government orders. By analyzing Philadelphia's workplaces and neighborhoods, Wolfinger shows the ways in which politics played out on the personal level. People's experiences in their jobs and homes, he argues, fundamentally shaped how they thought about the crucial political issues of the day, including the New Deal and its relationship to the American people, the meaning of World War II in a country with an imperfect democracy, and the growth of the suburbs in the 1950s. As Wolfinger demonstrates, internal fractures in New Deal liberalism, the roots of modern conservatism, and the politics of race were all deeply intertwined. Their interplay highlights how the Republican Party reinvented itself in the mid-twentieth century by using race-based politics to destroy the Democrats' fledgling multiracial alliance while simultaneously building a coalition of its own.

Up South

Author: Matthew J. Countryman
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 9780812220025
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Up South documents the efforts of Philadelphia's Black Power activists to construct a vital and effective social movement combining analyses of racism with a program of grassroots community organizing in the context of the failure of civil rights liberalism to deliver on its promise of racial equality.

Building the Beloved Community

Author: Stanley Keith Arnold
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781628460025
Format: PDF
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How a northern city with de facto segregation overcame prejudice and became a beacon for the rest of America

Race Space and Exclusion

Author: Robert Adelman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317675231
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This collection of original essays takes a new look at race in urban spaces by highlighting the intersection of the physical separation of minority groups and the social processes of their marginalization. Race, Space, and Exclusion provides a dynamic and productive dialogue among scholars of racial exclusion and segregation from different perspectives, theoretical and methodological angles, and social science disciplines. This text is ideal for upper-level undergraduate or lower-level graduate courses on housing policy, urban studies, inequalities, and planning courses.

L A City Limits

Author: Josh Sides
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520248309
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A lively history of modern black Los Angeles from the Great Depression to the present.

The Truce

Author: Karen Umemoto
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780801443725
Format: PDF, Mobi
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'The Truce' highlights the difference in interpretations among combatants, witnesses, and law enforcement agents and others whose actions often had unintended consequences. Umemoto provides guidance for policymakers and concerned members of the public faced with violence in an ever-changing urban landscape.

Living as Equals

Author: Phyllis M. Palmer
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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Using interviews with leaders and participants, as well as historical archives, the author documents three interracial sites where white Americans put themselves into unprecedented relationships with African Americans, Mexican Americans, and Asian Americans. In teen summer camps in the New York City and Los Angeles areas, students from largely segregated schools worked and played together; in Washington, DC, families fought blockbusting and white flight to build an integrated neighborhood; and in San Antonio, white community activists joined in coalition with Mexican American groups to advocate for power in a city government monopolized by Anglos. Women often took the lead in organizations that were upsetting patterns of men's protective authority at the same time as white people's racial dominance.

Parish Boundaries

Author: John T. McGreevy
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226558745
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In vivid portraits of parish life, historian John McGreevy examines the contacts and conflicts between Euro-American Catholics and their African-American neighbors. By tracing the transformation of a church, its people, and the nation, McGreevy illuminates the enormous impact of religious culture on modern American society. "PARISH BOUNDARIES can take its place in the front ranks of the literature of urban race relations".--Jonathan Dorfman, WASHINGTON POST BOOK REVIEW. 29 photos.