Mathematical Models in Population Biology and Epidemiology

Author: Fred Brauer
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1475735162
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The goal of this book is to search for a balance between simple and analyzable models and unsolvable models which are capable of addressing important questions on population biology. Part I focusses on single species simple models including those which have been used to predict the growth of human and animal population in the past. Single population models are, in some sense, the building blocks of more realistic models -- the subject of Part II. Their role is fundamental to the study of ecological and demographic processes including the role of population structure and spatial heterogeneity -- the subject of Part III. This book, which will include both examples and exercises, is of use to practitioners, graduate students, and scientists working in the field.

Mathematical Models in Population Biology and Epidemiology

Author: Fred Brauer
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461416868
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
The goal of this book is to search for a balance between simple and analyzable models and unsolvable models which are capable of addressing important questions on population biology. Part I focusses on single species simple models including those which have been used to predict the growth of human and animal population in the past. Single population models are, in some sense, the building blocks of more realistic models -- the subject of Part II. Their role is fundamental to the study of ecological and demographic processes including the role of population structure and spatial heterogeneity -- the subject of Part III. This book, which will include both examples and exercises, is of use to practitioners, graduate students, and scientists working in the field.

Mathematical Models in Population Biology and Epidemiology

Author: Fred Brauer
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9780387989020
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
The goal of this book is to search for a balance between simple and analyzable models and unsolvable models which are capable of addressing important questions on population biology. Part I focusses on single species simple models including those which have been used to predict the growth of human and animal population in the past. Single population models are, in some sense, the building blocks of more realistic models -- the subject of Part II. Their role is fundamental to the study of ecological and demographic processes including the role of population structure and spatial heterogeneity -- the subject of Part III. This book, which will include both examples and exercises, is of use to practitioners, graduate students, and scientists working in the field.

Mathematical Epidemiology

Author: Fred Brauer
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 3540789103
Format: PDF, Docs
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Based on lecture notes of two summer schools with a mixed audience from mathematical sciences, epidemiology and public health, this volume offers a comprehensive introduction to basic ideas and techniques in modeling infectious diseases, for the comparison of strategies to plan for an anticipated epidemic or pandemic, and to deal with a disease outbreak in real time. It covers detailed case studies for diseases including pandemic influenza, West Nile virus, and childhood diseases. Models for other diseases including Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, fox rabies, and sexually transmitted infections are included as applications. Its chapters are coherent and complementary independent units. In order to accustom students to look at the current literature and to experience different perspectives, no attempt has been made to achieve united writing style or unified notation. Notes on some mathematical background (calculus, matrix algebra, differential equations, and probability) have been prepared and may be downloaded at the web site of the Centre for Disease Modeling (www.cdm.yorku.ca).

Structured Population Models in Biology and Epidemiology

Author: Pierre Magal
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3540782737
Format: PDF, ePub
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In this new century mankind faces ever more challenging environmental and publichealthproblems,suchaspollution,invasionbyexoticspecies,theem- gence of new diseases or the emergence of diseases into new regions (West Nile virus,SARS,Anthrax,etc.),andtheresurgenceofexistingdiseases(in?uenza, malaria, TB, HIV/AIDS, etc.). Mathematical models have been successfully used to study many biological, epidemiological and medical problems, and nonlinear and complex dynamics have been observed in all of those contexts. Mathematical studies have helped us not only to better understand these problems but also to ?nd solutions in some cases, such as the prediction and control of SARS outbreaks, understanding HIV infection, and the investi- tion of antibiotic-resistant infections in hospitals. Structuredpopulationmodelsdistinguishindividualsfromoneanother- cording to characteristics such as age, size, location, status, and movement, to determine the birth, growth and death rates, interaction with each other and with environment, infectivity, etc. The goal of structured population models is to understand how these characteristics a?ect the dynamics of these models and thus the outcomes and consequences of the biological and epidemiolo- cal processes. There is a very large and growing body of literature on these topics. This book deals with the recent and important advances in the study of structured population models in biology and epidemiology. There are six chapters in this book, written by leading researchers in these areas.

Mathematical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

Author: O. Diekmann
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780471492412
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Mathematical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases Model Building, Analysis and Interpretation O. Diekmann University of Utrecht, The Netherlands J. A. P. Heesterbeek Centre for Biometry Wageningen, The Netherlands The mathematical modelling of epidemics in populations is a vast and important area of study. It is about translating biological assumptions into mathematics, about mathematical analysis aided by interpretation and about obtaining insight into epidemic phenomena when translating mathematical results back into population biology. Model assumptions are formulated in terms of, usually stochastic, behaviour of individuals and then the resulting phenomena, at the population level, are unravelled. Conceptual clarity is attained, assumptions are stated clearly, hidden working hypotheses are attained and mechanistic links between different observables are exposed. Features: * Model construction, analysis and interpretation receive detailed attention * Uniquely covers both deterministic and stochastic viewpoints * Examples of applications given throughout * Extensive coverage of the latest research into the mathematical modelling of epidemics of infectious diseases * Provides a solid foundation of modelling skills The reader will learn to translate, model, analyse and interpret, with the help of the numerous exercises. In literally working through this text, the reader acquires modelling skills that are also valuable outside of epidemiology, certainly within population dynamics, but even beyond that. In addition, the reader receives training in mathematical argumentation. The text is aimed at applied mathematicians with an interest in population biology and epidemiology, at theoretical biologists and epidemiologists. Previous exposure to epidemic concepts is not required, as all background information is given. The book is primarily aimed at self-study and ideally suited for small discussion groups, or for use as a course text.

Differential Equations Models in Biology Epidemiology and Ecology

Author: Stavros Busenberg
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 3642456928
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The past forty years have been the stage for the maturation of mathematical biolo~ as a scientific field. The foundations laid by the pioneers of the field during the first half of this century have been combined with advances in ap plied mathematics and the computational sciences to create a vibrant area of scientific research with established research journals, professional societies, deep subspecialty areas, and graduate education programs. Mathematical biology is by its very nature cross-disciplinary, and research papers appear in mathemat ics, biology and other scientific journals, as well as in the specialty journals devoted to mathematical and theoretical biology. Multiple author papers are common, and so are collaborations between individuals who have academic bases in different traditional departments. Those who seek to keep abreast of current trends and problems need to interact with research workers from a much broader spectrum of fields than is common in the traditional mono-culture disciplines. Consequently, it is beneficial to have occasions which bring together significant numbers of workers in this field in a forum that encourages the exchange of ideas and which leads to a timely publication of the work that is presented. Such an occasion occurred during January 13 to 16, 1990 when almost two hun dred research workers participated in an international conference on Differential Equations and Applications to Biology and Population Dynamics which was held in Claremont.

Dynamical Systems in Population Biology

Author: Xiao-Qiang Zhao
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319564331
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This research monograph provides an introduction to the theory of nonautonomous semiflows with applications to population dynamics. It develops dynamical system approaches to various evolutionary equations such as difference, ordinary, functional, and partial differential equations, and pays more attention to periodic and almost periodic phenomena. The presentation includes persistence theory, monotone dynamics, periodic and almost periodic semiflows, basic reproduction ratios, traveling waves, and global analysis of prototypical population models in ecology and epidemiology. Research mathematicians working with nonlinear dynamics, particularly those interested in applications to biology, will find this book useful. It may also be used as a textbook or as supplementary reading for a graduate special topics course on the theory and applications of dynamical systems. Dr. Xiao-Qiang Zhao is a University Research Professor at Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada. His main research interests involve applied dynamical systems, nonlinear differential equations, and mathematical biology. He is the author of more than 100 papers, and his research has played an important role in the development of the theory and applications of monotone dynamical systems, periodic and almost periodic semiflows, uniform persistence, and basic reproduction ratios.

Population Biology

Author: Alan Hastings
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1475727313
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Population biology has been investigated quantitatively for many decades, resulting in a rich body of scientific literature. Ecologists often avoid this literature, put off by its apparently formidable mathematics. This textbook provides an introduction to the biology and ecology of populations by emphasizing the roles of simple mathematical models in explaining the growth and behavior of populations. The author only assumes acquaintance with elementary calculus, and provides tutorial explanations where needed to develop mathematical concepts. Examples, problems, extensive marginal notes and numerous graphs enhance the book's value to students in classes ranging from population biology and population ecology to mathematical biology and mathematical ecology. The book will also be useful as a supplement to introductory courses in ecology.

The Population Biology of Tuberculosis

Author: Christopher Dye
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 140086657X
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Despite decades of developments in immunization and drug therapy, tuberculosis remains among the leading causes of human mortality, and no country has successfully eradicated the disease. Reenvisioning tuberculosis from the perspective of population biology, this book examines why the disease is so persistent and what must be done to fight it. Treating tuberculosis and its human hosts as dynamic, interacting populations, Christopher Dye seeks new answers to key questions by drawing on demography, ecology, epidemiology, evolution, and population genetics. Dye uses simple mathematical models to investigate how cases and deaths could be reduced, and how interventions could lead to TB elimination. Dye's analysis reveals a striking gap between the actual and potential impact of current interventions, especially drug treatment, and he suggests placing more emphasis on early case detection and the treatment of active or incipient tuberculosis. He argues that the response to disappointingly slow rates of disease decline is not to abandon long-established principles of chemotherapy, but to implement them with greater vigor. Summarizing epidemiological insights from population biology, Dye stresses the need to take a more inclusive view of the factors that affect disease, including characteristics of the pathogen, individuals and populations, health care systems, and physical and social environments. In broadening the horizons of TB research, The Population Biology of Tuberculosis demonstrates what must be done to prevent, control, and defeat this global threat in the twenty-first century.