Medical Malpractice in Nineteenth Century America

Author: Kenneth De Ville
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814744168
Format: PDF, Docs
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Highly readable . . . . interdisciplinary history of a high order. -- The Historian Well-written and superbly documented . . . . Both physicians and lawyers will find this book useful and fascinating. -- Journal of the American Medical Association This is the first book-length historical study of medical malpractice in 19th-century America and it is exceedingly well done . . . . The author reveals that, beginning in the 1840s, Americans began to initiate malpractice lawsuits against their physicians and surgeons. Among the reasons for this development were the decline in the belief in divine providence, increased competition between physicians and medical sects, and advances in medical science that led to unrealistically high expectations of the ability of physicians to cure . . . . This book is well written, often entertaining and witty, and is historically accurate, based on the best secondary, as well as primary sources from the time period. Highly recommended. -- Choice Adept at not only traditional historical research but also cultural studies, the author treats the reader to an intriguing discussion of how 19th-century Americans came truly to see their bodies differently . . . . a sophisticated new standard in the field of malpractice history. -- The Journal of the Early Republic By far the best compilation and analysis of early medical malpractice cases I have seen . . . . this excellently crafted study is bound to be of interest to a large number of readers. -- James C. Mohr, author of Abortion in America: The Origins and Evolution of a National Policy

The End of the American Avant Garde

Author: Stuart D. Hobbs
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 081473538X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In the first half of the twentieth century, the United States served as home to an avant garde that existed in contradiction to the consumer culture identified with modern industrial capitalism. Composed of a remarkable group of musicians, writers, and artists, these intellectuals used their talents to express a profound alienation from their culture and a belief that, through the integration of art and life, a new consciousness could be created and American culture thereby transformed. How did the avant garde dissolve, and why? In this thought-provoking work, Stuart D. Hobbs traces the avant garde from its origins to its eventual appropriation by a conservative political agenda, consumer culture, and the institutional world of art. He synthesizes the work of literary, art, and music historians with a fresh examination of primary source materials, giving the reader a unique perspective on the intellectual and cultural history of this country.