Metis Mixed Blood Stories

Author: Lynn Ponton
Publisher: Sunstone Press
ISBN: 1611390060
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Metis are the descendants of Cree and Assiniboine women who joined with French and Scottish men to raise children and shape a hybrid culture in the heart of Canada. In “Metis, Mixed Blood Stories,” four generations of adolescents come of age during their sixteenth year. Together their voices tell the story of one family and of a people. Matriarch Angeline describes her ride on the last great buffalo hunt of the 1860s and her relationship with charismatic Metis leader Louie Riel. Her grandson, Gilles, relates his escape from a Chicago orphanage and his fight to stay out of reservation school. Gilles’s daughter, Elisabeth, fights to protect the rights of native youth in the violent 1968 U.S. Democratic Convention. The novel closes with the vibrant voice with which it begins, that of great-granddaughter Annie, whose creativity as a young author and filmmaker will ensure that the legacy of their culture lives on. LYNN PONTON is the author of two previous books of nonfiction, “The Romance of Risk: Why Teenagers Do the Things They Do” and “The Sex Lives of Teenagers: Revealing the Secret World of Adolescent Boys and Girls.” She has been a columnist for Salon.com and has published widely in numerous magazines, newspapers, and journals. A practicing psychoanalyst, she is Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. This is her first work of fiction.

The New North American Studies

Author: Winfried Siemerling
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415335973
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Winner of the English Book Award, Grand Prix du Livre 2006 de la Ville de Sherbrooke. In this original and groundbreaking study, Winfried Siemerling examines the complexities of recognition and identity, rejecting previous nationalized thinking to approach North American cultural transformations from transnational and interdisciplinary perspectives. Using material from the United States and Canada as case studies and drawing on a wide range of texts and theorists, he examines postcoloniality and cultural emergence from the sixties to the present against earlier backgrounds. Siemerling's argument for a retheorization of the field takes on the full history of multiculturalism debates, including radical readings of W.E.B. Du Bois and Charles Taylor and their relation to G.W.F. Hegel, and challenging many of the models of multiculturalism in use today. Tackling controversial subjects such as identity politics, The New North American Studies proposes a fresh outlook on the most central issues of North American cultural politics, from debates on canon formation to the role of racial and linguistic difference. Concluding with a look at the future of cultural difference, Winfried Siemerling's study is an innovative rethinking of the whole field of North American Studies.

Canadian History Beginnings to Confederation

Author: Martin Brook Taylor
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 9780802068262
Format: PDF, Mobi
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"In these two volumes, which replace the Reader's Guide to Canadian History, experts provide a select and critical guide to historical writing about pre- and post-Confederation Canada, with an emphasis on the most recent scholarship" -- Cover.

Race Rhetoric and Composition

Author: Keith Gilyard
Publisher: Heinemann
ISBN: 9780867094848
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This volume is perhaps the most important and significant contribution yet made in rhetoric and composition to critical race studies.

Tensions of Empire

Author: Frederick Cooper
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520206052
Format: PDF, Docs
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Starting with the premise that Europe was made by its imperial projects as much as colonial encounters were shaped by events and conflicts in Europe, this volume investigates metropolitan-colonial relationships. It shows how "civilizing missions" often provided new sites for a bourgeois order.

Living with Strangers

Author: David G. McCrady
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442609907
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In The Pension Fund Revolution, originally published nearly two decades ago under the title The Unseen Revolution, Drucker reports that institutional investors, especially pension funds, have become the controlling owners of America's large companies, the country's only capitalists. He maintains that the shift began in 1952 with the establishment of the first modern pension fund by General Motors. By 1960 it had become so obvious that a group of young men decided to found a stock-exchange firm catering exclusively to these new investors. Ten years later this firm (Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette) became the most successful, and one of the biggest, Wall Street firms. Drucker's argument, that through pension funds ownership of the means of production had become socialized without becoming nationalized, was unacceptable to the conventional wisdom of the country in the 1970s. Even less acceptable was the second theme of the book: the aging of America. Among the predictions made by Drucker in The Pension Fund Revolution are: that a major health care issue would be longevity; that pensions and social security would be central to American economy and society; that the retirement age would have to be extended; and that altogether American politics would increasingly be dominated by middle-class issues and the values of elderly people. While readers of the original edition found these conclusions hard to accept, Drucker's work has proven to be prescient. In the new epilogue, Drucker discusses how the increasing dominance of pension funds represents one of the most startling power shifts in economic history, and he examines their present-day Impact. The Pension Fund Revolution is now considered a classic text regarding the effects of pension fund ownership on the governance of the American corporation and on the structure of the American economy altogether. The reissuing of this book is more timely now than ever. It provides a wealth of information for sociologists, economists, and political theorists.

Hybridity and Its Discontents

Author: Avtar Brah
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113465006X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Hybridity and its Discontents explores the history and experience of 'hybridity' - the mixing of peoples and cultures - in North and South America, Latin America, Britain and Ireland, South Africa, Asia and the Pacific. The contributors trace manifestations of hybridity in debates about miscengenation and racial purity, in scientific notions of genetics and 'race', in processes of cultural translation, and in ideas of nation, community and belonging. The contributors begin by examining the persistence of anxieties about racial 'contamination', from nineteenth-century fears of miscegenation to more recent debates about mixed race relationships and parenting. Examining the lived experiences of children of 'mixed parentage', contributors ask why such fears still thrive in a supposedly tolerant culture? The contributors go on to discuss how science, while apparently neutral, is part of cultural discourses, which affect its constructions and classifications of gender and 'race'. The contributors examine how new cultural forms emerge from borrowings, exchanges and intersections across ethnic and cultural boundaries, and conclude by investigating the contemporary experience of multiculturalism in an age of contested national borders and identities.

The Red and the White A Family Saga of the American West

Author: Andrew R. Graybill
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0871407329
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Winner of the Labriola Center American Indian National Book Award. One of the American West’s bloodiest—and least-known—massacres is searingly re-created in this generation-spanning history of native-white intermarriage. At dawn on January 23, 1870, four hundred men of the Second U.S. Cavalry attacked and butchered a Piegan camp near the Marias River in Montana in one of the worst slaughters of Indians by American military forces in U.S. history. Coming to avenge the murder of their father—a former fur-trader named Malcolm Clarke who had been killed four months earlier by their Piegan mother’s cousin—Clarke ’s own two sons joined the cavalry in a slaughter of many of their own relatives. In this groundbreaking work of American history, Andrew R. Graybill places the Marias Massacre within a larger, three-generation saga of the Clarke family, particularly illuminating the complex history of native-white intermarriage in the American Northwest.