Mexicanos

Author: Manuel G. Gonzales
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253221250
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Newly revised and updated, Mexicanos tells the rich and vibrant story of Mexicans in the United States. Emerging from the ruins of Aztec civilization and from centuries of Spanish contact with indigenous people, Mexican culture followed the Spanish colonial frontier northward and put its distinctive mark on what became the southwestern United States. Shaped by their Indian and Spanish ancestors, deeply influenced by Catholicism, and tempered by an often difficult existence, Mexicans continue to play an important role in U.S. society, even as the dominant Anglo culture strives to assimilate them. Thorough and balanced, Mexicanos makes a valuable contribution to the understanding of the Mexican population of the United States—a growing minority who are a vital presence in 21st-century America.

Mexicanos Second Edition

Author: Manuel G. Gonzales
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253007771
Format: PDF
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Newly revised and updated, Mexicanos tells the rich and vibrant story of Mexicans in the United States. Emerging from the ruins of Aztec civilization and from centuries of Spanish contact with indigenous people, Mexican culture followed the Spanish colonial frontier northward and put its distinctive mark on what became the southwestern United States. Shaped by their Indian and Spanish ancestors, deeply influenced by Catholicism, and tempered by an often difficult existence, Mexicans continue to play an important role in U.S. society, even as the dominant Anglo culture strives to assimilate them. Thorough and balanced, Mexicanos makes a valuable contribution to the understanding of the Mexican population of the United States—a growing minority who are a vital presence in 21st-century America.

Mexicanos

Author: Manuel G. Gonzales
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253353688
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Newly revised and updated,Mexicanostells the rich and vibrant story of Mexicans in the United States. Emerging from the ruins of Aztec civilization and from centuries of Spanish contact with indigenous people, Mexican culture followed the Spanish colonial frontier northward and put its distinctive mark on what became the south-western United States. Shaped by their Indian and Spanish ancestors, deeply influenced by Catholicism, and tempered by an often difficult existence, Mexicans continue to play an important role in U.S. society, even as the dominant Anglo culture strives to assimilate them. Thorough and balanced,Mexicanosmakes a valuable contribution To The understanding of the Mexican population of the United States—a growing minority who are a vital presence in 21st-century America.

Mexicanos

Author: Manuel G. Gonzales
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253214003
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Mexicanostells the rich and vibrant story of Mexicans in the United States. Emerging from the ruins of Aztec civilization and from centuries of Spanish contact with indigenous people, Mexican culture followed the Spanish colonial frontier northward and put its distinctive mark on what became the southwestern United States. Shaped by their Indian and Spanish ancestors, deeply influenced by Catholicism, and tempered by an often difficult existence, Mexicans continue to play an important role in U.S. society, even as the dominant Anglo culture strives to assimilate them. Manuel Gonzales traces the Mexicanos story from before the arrival of the Spanish, through the years of the expanding Spanish frontier, to the creation of the Mexican republic and its relations with the United States - the "Colossus of the North" - along a contentious border. Gonzales describes Mexican life in the young American Southwest and tracks the growing tide of emigration northwardÐalways present, but especially strong in the early years of the twentieth century. He recounts the economic hardships of Mexican Americans during the Depression years, the trials of war and its aftermath, and the explosion of ethnic pride and political awareness in the Chicano Movement of the 1960s. Reviewing the history of the last twenty-five years, he sees the failed promise of political and economic gains for Mexicans in the United States, as well as hopeful signs for the future. Throughout this history, Gonzales attempts to do justice to the variety of experience in what is, after all, a heterogeneous community. He tells of vendidos (sellouts) and heroes, the legendary an the little-known, the failures and the triumphant. Thorough and balanced,Mexicanosmakes a valuable contribution to the understanding of the Mexican population of the United States, a growing minority who will be a vital presence in twenty-first-century America. A product of the Chicano Movement of the 1960s, the systematic study of the history of Mexicanos in the United States - both native-born and immigrant - has been dominated during the past thirty years by movement scholar-activists. Today, Mexican-American history continues to be taught primarily in Chicano/a Studies departments, largely from a militant perspective. However, a changing intellectual climate suggests that the time is ripe for a fresh reassessment of the Mexican-American past. Indeed, in a search for alternate perspectives, even some Chicano and Chicana scholars themselves have begun to challenge the prevailing ethnic studies approach, where victimisation and resistance have been the predominant themes. Eschewing celebratory history, these researchers, from a variety of disciplines, are slowly constructing a more nuanced portrait of Mexican-American life. In fact, much of their work has been on the cutting edge of contemporary research on class, race, gender, and sexuality. Combining the best of the new studies by these Chicano/a revisionists with insights gained through his rigorous grounding in European and Latin American as well as Mexican-American history, Manuel G. Gonzales offers a 'non-movement' interpretation of the evolution of the growing Mexican communities in the United States. Throughout, Gonzales attempts to relate the lives of all segments of the heterogeneous ethnic community, not just the heroes who loom so large in movement portrayals; 'even vendidos (sellouts),' he notes, 'have a history.' Moreover, in contrast to older studies, Gonzales's book probes the failures as well as the successes of the community, resulting in a synthesis that is both fair and balanced. On the whole this survey makes a timely and valuable contribution to our understanding of our nation's Mexican population, a burgeoning minority who will play an expanding and vital role in 21-st century America.

En Aquel Entonces

Author: Manuel G. Gonzales
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253337658
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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En Aquel Entonces [In Those Days] Readings in Mexican-American History Edited by Manuel G. Gonzales and Cynthia M. Gonzales An interdisciplinary anthology covering diverse aspects of the Mexican-American experience in the United States. The advent of Chicano Studies in the 1960s spawned a tremendous interest in the history of Mexicans in the United States. Committed to a multidisciplinary approach from the very outset, Chicano and Chicana scholars used a variety of perspectives to explain the Mexican-American past, but much of this work has not been readily available to students. En Aquel Entonces is intended as a partial solution to the problem, an anthology that brings together 31 of the most innovative journal articles published during the past four decades. These articles, representing several disciplines, provide students of history with a panoramic portrait of Mexicanos in the United States while at the same time introducing them to Chicana/o historiography. Each of the essays has been carefully edited in consultation with its author to present a text that is more accessible to students and general readers Manuel G. Gonzales is Professor of History at Diablo Valley College and author of Andrea Costa and the Rise of Socialism in the Romagna, The Hispanic Elite of the Southwest, and Mexicanos: A History of Mexicans in the United States (Indiana University Press). Cynthia M. Gonzales is an Education Specialist at Ygnacio Learning Center in Walnut Creek, California and was Director of Education at Walnut Creek Hospital from 1985–1998. Contents Introduction by Manuel G. Gonzales I. Genesis of a People: Before 1848 Presidarias y Pobladoras: The Journey North and Life in Frontier California, Antonia I. Castaneda Honor Ideology, Marriage Negotiation, and Class-Gender Domination in New Mexico, 1690-1846, Ramon A. Gutierrez Gnats, Goods, and Greasers: Mexican Merchants on the Santa Fe Trail, David A. Sandoval Rancho Life in Alta California, Federico A. Sanchez Discovering the Tejano Community in "Early" Texas, Jesus F. de la Teja The Origins of Anti-Mexican Sentiment in the United States, Raymund A. Paredes II. Gringos versus Greasers: 1848–1900 In Re Ricardo Rodriguez: An Attempt at Chicano Disfranchisement in San Antonio, 1896–1897, Arnoldo De Leon Mexican-American Land Grant Adjudication, Armando C. Alonzo The Barrioization of Nineteenth-Century Mexican Californians: From Landowners to Laborers, Antonio Rios-Bustamante Tucsonenses and Angelenos: A Socio-Economic Study of Two Mexican-American Barrios, 1860–1880, Richard Griswold del Castillo Mexican American Catholicism in the Southwest: The Transformation of a Popular Religion, Alberto L. Pulido Carlos I. Velasco and the Defense of Mexican Rights in Territorial Arizona, Manuel G. Gonzales III. The Great Migration: 1900–1940 Chicanos in Chicago: A Brief History, Louise Ano Nuevo Kerr Settlers, Sojourners, and Proletarians: Social Formation in the Great Plains Sugar Beets Industry, 1890–1940, Dennis Nodin Valdes The Urbanization of Southwestern Chicanos in the Early 20th Century, Ricardo Romo Regionalism, Politics, and Gender in Southwest History: The League of United Latin American Citizens' Expansion into New Mexico from Texas, 1929–1945, Cynthia E. Orozco Labor Threat and Industrialized Agriculture in California: The Case of the 1933 San Joaquin Valley Cotton Strike, Ramon D. Chacon Women, Work, and Community in the Mexican Colonias of the Southern California Citrus Belt, Gilbert G. Gonzalez Texas Newspapers and Chicana Workers' Activism, 1919–1974, Irene Ledesma IV. The Rise of the Middle Class: 1940–1965 Braceros in the Pacific Northwest: Laborers on the Domestic Front, 1942–1947, Erasmo Gamboa Mexican Americans on the Home Front: Community Organizations in Arizona during World War II, Christine Marin A Promise Fulfilled: Mexican Cannery Workers

The Columbia History of Latinos in the United States Since 1960

Author: David G. Gutiérrez
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231508417
Format: PDF
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Latinos are now the largest so-called minority group in the United States -- the result of a growth trend that began in the mid-twentieth century -- and the influence of Latin cultures on American life is reflected in everything from politics to education to mass cultural forms such as music and television. Yet very few volumes have attempted to analyze or provide a context for this dramatic historical development. The Columbia History of Latinos in the United States Since 1960 is among the few comprehensive histories of Latinos in America. This collaborative, interdisciplinary volume provides not only cutting-edge interpretations of recent Latino history, including essays on the six major immigrant groups (Mexicans, Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Central Americans, and South Americans), but also insight into the major areas of contention and debate that characterize Latino scholarship in the early twenty-first century. This much-needed book offers a broad overview of this era of explosive demographic and cultural change by exploring the recent histories of all the major national and regional Latino subpopulations and reflecting on what these historical trends might mean for the future of both the United States and the other increasingly connected nations of the Western Hemisphere. While at one point it may have been considered feasible to explore the histories of national populations in isolation from one another, all of the contributors to this volume highlight the deep transnational ties and interconnections that bind different peoples across national and regional lines. Thus, each chapter on Latino national subpopulations explores the ambiguous and shifting boundaries that so loosely define them both in the United States and in their countries of origin. A multinational perspective on important political and cultural themes -- such as Latino gender systems, religion, politics, expressive and artistic cultures, and interactions with the law -- helps shape a realistic interpretation of the Latino experience in the United States.

The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo

Author: Richard Griswold del Castillo
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806124780
Format: PDF
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Signed in 1848, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ended the war between the United States and Mexico and gave a large portion of Mexico’s northern territories to the United States. The language of the treaty was designed to deal fairly with the people who became residents of the United States by default. However, as Richard Griswold del Castillo points out, articles calling for equality and protection of civil and property rights were either ignored or interpreted to favor those involved in the westward expansion of the United States rather than the Mexicans and Indians living in the conquered territories.

Walls and Mirrors

Author: David G. Gutiérrez
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520202198
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Covering more than one hundred years of American history, Walls and Mirrors examines the ways that continuous immigration from Mexico transformed—and continues to shape—the political, social, and cultural life of the American Southwest. Taking a fresh approach to one of the most divisive political issues of our time, David Gutiérrez explores the ways that nearly a century of steady immigration from Mexico has shaped ethnic politics in California and Texas, the two largest U.S. border states. Drawing on an extensive body of primary and secondary sources, Gutiérrez focuses on the complex ways that their pattern of immigration influenced Mexican Americans' sense of social and cultural identity—and, as a consequence, their politics. He challenges the most cherished American myths about U.S. immigration policy, pointing out that, contrary to rhetoric about "alien invasions," U.S. government and regional business interests have actively recruited Mexican and other foreign workers for over a century, thus helping to establish and perpetuate the flow of immigrants into the United States. In addition, Gutiérrez offers a new interpretation of the debate over assimilation and multiculturalism in American society. Rejecting the notion of the melting pot, he explores the ways that ethnic Mexicans have resisted assimilation and fought to create a cultural space for themselves in distinctive ethnic communities throughout the southwestern United States.

Stories from the Barrio

Author: Carlos Eliseo Cuéllar
Publisher: Texas Christian University Press
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A Hispanic odyssey into the history of Fort Worth traces the social, cultural, economic, and political history of the city's fastest growing ethnic minority, from early Mexicanos fleeing the violence of the Mexican Revolution, through the culture clash experienced by second-generation Mexican Americans, to the present day.

Californio Voices

Author: José Mariá Amador
Publisher: University of North Texas Press
ISBN: 1574411918
Format: PDF, ePub
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In the early 1870s, Hubert H. Bancroft and his assistants set out to record the memoirs of early Californios, one of them being eighty-three-year-old Don Jose Maria Amador, a former Forty-Niner during the California Gold Rush and soldado de cuera at the Presidio of San Francisco. Amador tells of reconnoitering expeditions into the interior of California, where he encountered local indigenous populations. He speaks of political events of Mexican California and the widespread confiscation of the Californios' goods, livestock, and properties when the United States took control. A friend from Mission Santa Cruz, Lorenzo Asisara, also describes the harsh life and mistreatment the Indians faced from the priests. Both the Amador and Asisara narratives were used as sources in Bancroft's writing but never published themselves. Gregorio Mora-Torres has now rescued them from obscurity and presents their voices in English translation (with annotations) and in the original Spanish on facing pages. This bilingual edition will be of great interest to historians of the West, California, and Mexican American studies.