Mexico Is Not Colombia

Author: Christopher Paul
Publisher: Rand Corporation
ISBN: 0833084445
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Despite the scope of the threat they pose to Mexico’s security, violent drug-trafficking organizations are not well understood, and optimal strategies to combat them have not been identified. While there is no perfectly analogous case to Mexico’s current security situation, historical case studies may offer lessons for policymakers as they cope with challenges related to violence and corruption in that country.

Criminal Insurgents in Mexico and Latin America

Author: Robert Bunker & John Sullivan, Editors
Publisher: iUniverse
ISBN: 1491759801
Format: PDF, Docs
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The 4th Small Wars Journal—El Centro anthology comes at a pivotal time, roughly a third of the way through the term, for the Enrique Peña Nieto administration in Mexico. The mass kidnapping and execution of 43 rural student teachers in Iguala, Guerrero in late September 2014 has only served to further highlight the corruptive effects of organized crime on the public institutions in that country. In addition, many other states in Latin America are now suffering at the hands of criminal insurgents who are threatening their citizens and challenging their sovereign rights. Dave Dilegge, SWJ Editor-in-Chief

Reducing Drug Trafficking Revenues and Violence in Mexico

Author: Beau Kilmer
Publisher: Rand Corporation
ISBN: 9780833051073
Format: PDF, ePub
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U.S. demand for illicit drugs creates markets for Mexican drug- trafficking organizations (DTOs) and helps foster violence in Mexico. This paper examines how marijuana legalization in California might influence DTO revenues and the violence in Mexico.

Drugs Thugs and Diplomats

Author: Winifred Tate
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804795673
Format: PDF
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In 2000, the U.S. passed a major aid package that was going to help Colombia do it all: cut drug trafficking, defeat leftist guerrillas, support peace, and build democracy. More than 80% of the assistance, however, was military aid, at a time when the Colombian security forces were linked to abusive, drug-trafficking paramilitary forces. Drugs, Thugs, and Diplomats examines the U.S. policymaking process in the design, implementation, and consequences of Plan Colombia, as the aid package came to be known. Winifred Tate explores the rhetoric and practice of foreign policy by the U.S. State Department, the Pentagon, Congress, and the U.S. military Southern Command. Tate's ethnography uncovers how policymakers' utopian visions and emotional entanglements play a profound role in their efforts to orchestrate and impose social transformation abroad. She argues that U.S. officials' zero tolerance for illegal drugs provided the ideological architecture for the subsequent militarization of domestic drug policy abroad. The U.S. also ignored Colombian state complicity with paramilitary brutality, presenting them as evidence of an absent state and the authentic expression of a frustrated middle class. For rural residents of Colombia living under paramilitary dominion, these denials circulated as a form of state terror. Tate's analysis examines how oppositional activists and the policy's targets—civilians and local state officials in southern Colombia—attempted to shape aid design and delivery, revealing the process and effects of human rights policymaking.

Home Grown

Author: Isaac Campos
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807882682
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Historian Isaac Campos combines wide-ranging archival research with the latest scholarship on the social and cultural dimensions of drug-related behavior in this telling of marijuana's remarkable history in Mexico. Introduced in the sixteenth century by the Spanish, cannabis came to Mexico as an industrial fiber and symbol of European empire. But, Campos demonstrates, as it gradually spread to indigenous pharmacopoeias, then prisons and soldiers' barracks, it took on both a Mexican name--marijuana--and identity as a quintessentially "Mexican" drug. A century ago, Mexicans believed that marijuana could instantly trigger madness and violence in its users, and the drug was outlawed nationwide in 1920. Home Grown thus traces the deep roots of the antidrug ideology and prohibitionist policies that anchor the drug-war violence that engulfs Mexico today. Campos also counters the standard narrative of modern drug wars, which casts global drug prohibition as a sort of informal American cultural colonization. Instead, he argues, Mexican ideas were the foundation for notions of "reefer madness" in the United States. This book is an indispensable guide for anyone who hopes to understand the deep and complex origins of marijuana's controversial place in North American history.

The Challenge of Violent Drug Trafficking Organizations

Author: Christopher Paul
Publisher: RAND Corporation
ISBN: 9780833058270
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A RAND team conducted a Delphi expert elicitation exercise, the results of which offer an assessment of the contemporary security situation in Mexico through the lens of existing RAND research on urban instability and unrest, historical insurgencies, and defense-sector reform. Assessment scorecards from these projects were used to obtain input from the expert panel and to guide the resulting discussion.

Children of the Drug War

Author: Damon Barrett
Publisher: IDEA
ISBN: 9781617700187
Format: PDF, ePub
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Book Description: A unique collection of original essays that investigates the impacts of the war on drugs on children and young people. With contributions from around the world and utilizing a wide range of styles and approaches including ethnographic studies, personal accounts and interviews, the book asks three fundamental questions: What have been the costs to children of the war on drugs? Is the protection of children from drugs a solid justification for current policies? What kinds of public fears and preconceptions exist in relation to drugs and the drug trade?

Bribes Bullets and Intimidation

Author: Julie Marie Bunck
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271048662
Format: PDF
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"Examines drug trafficking through Central America and the efforts of law enforcement to counter it. Details the routes, methods, and networks involved, while comparing the evolution of the drug trade in Belize, Coast Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, and Panama over three decades"--Provided by publisher.

Terrorism Inc The Financing of Terrorism Insurgency and Irregular Warfare

Author: Colin P. Clarke Ph.D.
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440831041
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This in-depth, historical analysis of terrorism investigates the major funding streams of terrorists, insurgents, guerrillas, warlords, militias, and criminal organizations throughout the world as well as the efforts of the international community to thwart their efforts. • Examines the financing of major terrorist organizations such as ISIS, Al Qaeda, Hamas, Hezbollah, the Taliban, and other significant groups • Features maps of key regions and graphs comparing funding streams of various groups • Includes information derived from interviews with expert threat finance practitioners, academics, scholars, and policy professionals • Provides a chronology of critical events

Mexico s Narco insurgency and U S Counterdrug Policy

Author: Hal Brands
Publisher: Strategic Studies Institute
ISBN: 1584873884
Format: PDF, Docs
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On June 30, 2008, President George W. Bush signed into law the Merida Initiative, a 3-year, $1.4 billion counterdrug assistance program for Mexico and Central America. The Merida Initiative is representative of the supply-side approach to the narcotics trade that has long characterized U.S. drug control policy. Unfortunately, this approach to the drug trade is unlikely to achieve the desired results in Mexico. For the Merida Initiative to be fully successful, the United States must therefore forge a more holistic, better-integrated approach to the drug trade. Implementing such a strategy will not be easy, but it will be central to improving U.S. counternarcotics policy and ensuring that the Merida Initiative is more than a mere palliative for the problems associated with the Mexican drug trade.