Migration

Author: Michael Samers
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317408772
Format: PDF, Mobi
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While the subject of migration has received enormous attention in academic journals and books across the social sciences, introductory texts on the matter are few and far between. Even fewer books have explored migration through a critical and explicit engagement with spatial concepts. Now in its second edition, Migration remains the only text in more than a decade that emphasizes how geographical or spatial concepts can be used critically to understand migration. The multi-disciplinary text draws on insights from human geography, political science, social anthropology, sociology, and to a lesser extent economics. All of the chapters focus on key terms, theories, concepts, and issues concerning migration and immigration. The book argues that in the context of migration, two opposing ‘spatial positions’ have emerged in the wake of the critique of ‘methodological nationalism’. On one hand is the significance of ‘transnationalism’, and on the other, the importance of ‘sub-national’ or local processes. Both require more nuance and integration, while many of the concepts and theories which have thus far neglected space or have not been ‘treated’ spatially, need to be re-written with space in mind. Pedagogically the text combines a carefully defined structure, accessible language, boxes that explore case studies of migrant-related experiences in particular places, annotated suggestions for further reading, useful websites and relevant films and summary questions for student learning at the end of each chapter. Migration provides a critical, multi-disciplinary, advanced, and theoretically informed introduction to migration and immigration. Revised and updated with new material, new maps and illustrations and an accompanying website (https://migration2ndedition.wordpress.com/), it continues to be aimed at advanced undergraduates and Masters-level graduate students undertaking courses on migration and immigration.

Mobility

Author: Peter Adey
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 131736368X
Format: PDF, Docs
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Mobility aims to take the pulse of this enormously expanded and energetic field. It explores the breadth of the disciplinary areas mobility studies now encompass, examining the diverse conceptual and methodological approaches wielded within the field, and explores the utility of mobility to illuminate a cornucopia of mobile lives: from the mass movements of individuals within global processes such as migration and tourism, to homelessness and war; from the entangled relations caught up in the movement of disease, people and aid across borders, to the inability of someone to cross over a road. The new edition explores the more sustained elaboration of mobility studies within a wide variety of disciplinary approaches and subject matters. It echoes the growing internationalization of mobility research, reflected in diverse case studies from the Global South, South Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean and so far under-represented perspectives from China, Australasia, post-socialist Eastern Europe, the Middle East and elsewhere. The book also features an additional chapter on mobility studies, to survey and explore the diverse quality of the field, and methodologies, in order to reflect the growing diversity of methodological approaches to mobilities, from walk-alongs and critical cartography to the mobile arts. The book offers an accessible reading of the way mobility has been tackled and understood, neatly exploring and summarizing a topic that has exploded into different variations and nuances. The text allows scholars and students alike to grasp the central importance of ‘mobility’ to social, cultural, political, economic and everyday terrains by providing accessible writings on key authors within key ideas and case study boxes, suggested further readings and summaries, while at the same time making a significant contribution to scholarly writings and debates.

Key Concepts in Development Geography

Author: Rob Potter
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1446267997
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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"An excellent and supremely accessible guide to some key issues in development geography" - Stuart Corbridge, London School of Economics "Provides a clearly stated, informed and strongly structured pathway through the key literatures and debates" - Jonathan Rigg, Durham University Organized around 24 short essays, Key Concepts in Development Geography is an introductory text that provides students with the core concepts that form contemporary research and ideas within the development geography discipline. Written in a clear and transparent style, the book includes: an introductory chapter providing a succinct overview of the recent developments in the field over 24 key concept entries that provide comprehensive definitions, explanations and evolutions of the subject excellent pedagogy to enhance students' understanding including a glossary, figures, diagrams, and further reading. Organized around five of the most important areas of concern, the book covers: the meanings and measurement of development; its theory and practice; work, employment and development; people, culture and development; and contemporary issues in development. The perfect companion for undergraduate and postgraduate students on geography degrees, the book is a timely look at the pressingly important field of international development studies today.

Migration in World History

Author: Patrick Manning
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415516781
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This book traces the connections among regions brought about by the movement of people, diseases, crops, technology and ideas. Drawing on examples from a wide range of geographical regions and thematic areas, noted world historian Patrick Manning guides the reader through the earliest human migrations, including the earliest hominids, their development and spread, and the controversy surrounding the rise of homo sapiens ; the rise and spread of major language groups ; an examination of civilizations, farmers and pastoralists from 3000 BCE to 500 CE ; trade patterns including the early Silk Road and maritime trade in the Mediterrane and more.

Global Migration

Author: Elizabeth Mavroudi
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317225880
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Global Migration provides a clear, concise, and well-organized discussion of historical patterns and contemporary trends of migration, while guiding the readers through an often difficult and politicised topic. Aimed primarily at undergraduate and Master’s students, the text encourages the readers to reflect on economic processes, politics, immigrant lives and raises debates about inclusion, exclusion, and citizenship. The text critically highlights the global character of contemporary migration and the importance of historical context to current processes and emphasises the role of gender, race and national ideologies in shaping migration experiences. Using over a decade of their own insight into teaching undergraduate migration courses in the US and the UK, and the knowledge and understanding of the subject they have acquired as migration researchers, the authors offer an accessible and student-friendly manner for readers to understand and explore the complex issue of migration. The book features numerous international case studies, a chapter dedicated to the perspective of the immigrants themselves, as well as key terms and further readings at the end of each chapter. Both theoretically and empirically informed Global Migration examines the subject in a holistic and expansive way. It will equip students with an understanding of the complex issues of migration and serve as a guide for instructors in structuring their courses and in identifying important bodies of scholarly research on migration issues.

Key Concepts in Migration

Author: David Bartram
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1473905451
Format: PDF, Docs
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"Demonstrates that the study of international migration has really come of age. From acculturation to undocumented immigration, the authors consider more than three dozen concepts at the heart of migration studies. Clearly written in a highly readable style, the book is a valuable resource for students and scholars alike." - Nancy Foner, City University of New York "This very useful and authoritative compendium explicates thirty-eight concepts central to analysis of international migration. It is accessible to undergraduate students and even can enrich graduate courses. It nicely complements books like The Age of Migration or Exceptional People. Concision is a virtue!" - Mark J. Miller, University of Delaware This book provides lucid and intuitive explanations of the most important migration concepts as used in classrooms, among policymakers, and in popular and academic discourse. Arguing that there is a clear need for a better public understanding of migration, it sets out to clarify the field by exploring relevant concepts in a direct and engaging way. Each concept: Includes an easy to understand definition Provides real-world examples Gives suggestions for further reading Is carefully cross-referenced to other related concepts It is an ideal resource for undergraduate and post-graduate students studying migration in sociology, politics, development and throughout the social sciences, as well as scholars in the field and practitioners in governmental and non-governmental organizations.

Forced Migration

Author: Alice Bloch
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131722695X
Format: PDF, Docs
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Forced Migration: Current Issues and Debates provides a critical engagement with and analysis of contemporary issues in the field using inter-disciplinary perspectives, through different geographical case studies and by employing varying methodologies. The combination of authors reviewing both the key research and scholarship and offering insights from their own research ensures a comprehensive and up-to-date analysis of the current issues in forced migration. The book is structured around three main current themes: the reconfiguration of borders including virtual borders, the expansion of prolonged exile, and changes in protection and access to rights. The first chapters in the collection provide both context and a theoretical overview by situating current debates and issues in their historical context including the evolution of field and the impact of the colonial and post-colonial world order on forced migration and forced displacement. These are followed by chapters framed around substantive issues including deportation and forced return; protracted displacements; securitising the Mediterranean and cross-border migration practices; refugees in global cities; forced migrants in the digital age; and second-generation identity and transnational practices. Forced Migration offers an original contribution to a growing field of study, connecting theoretical ideas and empirical research with policy, practice and the lived experiences of forced migrants. The volume provides a solid foundation, for students, academics and policy makers, of the main questions being asked in contemporary debates in forced migration.

Prisoners of Geography

Author: Tim Marshall
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1501121472
Format: PDF, Docs
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First published in Great Britain in 2015 by Elliott and Thompson Limited.

Migration Development and Transnationalization

Author: Nina Glick Schiller
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 0857458701
Format: PDF
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The relationship between migration and development is becoming an important field of study, yet the fundamentals – analytical tools, conceptual framework, political stance – are not being called into question or dialogue. This volume provides a valuable alternative perspective to the current literature as the contributors explore the contradictory discourses about migration and the role these discourses play in perpetuating inequality and a global regime of militarized surveillance. The assumptions surrounding the assymetrical transfers of resources that accompany migration are deeply skewed and continue to reflect the interests of the most powerful states and the institutions that serve their interests. Those who seek to address the morass of development failure, vitriolic attacks on immigrants, or sanguine views about migrant agency are challenged by this volume to put aside their methodological nationalism and pursue alternative pathways out of the quagmire of poverty, violence, and fear that is enveloping the globe.

Resilience

Author: Kevin Grove
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317340000
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Is resilience simply a fad, or is it a new way of thinking about human–environment relations, and the governance of these relations, that has real staying power? Is resilience a dangerous, depoliticizing concept that neuters incipient political activity, or the key to more empowering, emancipatory, and participatory forms of environmental management? Resilience offers an advanced introduction to these debates. It provides students with a detailed review of how the concept emerged from a small corner of ecology to critically challenge conventional environmental management practices, and radicalize how we can think about and manage social and ecological change. But Resilience also situates this new style of thought and management within a particular historical and geographical context. It traces the roots of resilience to the cybernetically-influenced behavioral science of Herbert Simon, the neoliberal political economic theory of new institutional economics, the pragmatist philosophy of John Dewey, and the modernist design aesthetic of the Bauhaus school. These diverse roots are what distinguish resilience approaches from other ways of studying human-environment relations. Resilience thinking recalibrates the study of social and environmental change around a will to design, a drive or desire to synthesize diverse forms of knowledge and develop collaborative, cross-boundary solutions to complex problems. In contrast to the modes of analysis and critique found in geography and cognate disciplines, resilience approaches strive to pragmatically transform human–environment relations in ways that will produce more sustainable futures for complex social and ecological systems. In providing a road map to debates over resilience that brings together research from geography, anthropology, sociology, international relations, and philosophy, this book gives readers the conceptual and theoretical tools necessary to engage with political and ethical questions about how we can and should live together in an increasingly interconnected and unpredictable world.