Mimbres Mogollon Archaeology

Author: Anne I. Woosley
Publisher: University of New Mexico Press
ISBN:
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This book details investigations carried out at the Wind Mountain site in western New Mexico. The evidence spans a thousand years, from AD 250 to 1200 and provides much information on Mimbres Mogollon prehistory. The report includes chronology, architecture, ceramics, mortuary treatment of human and animal remains and the lithic assemblage. Appendices contain specialized reports on plant remains, archaeomagnetic work, petrographic observations of selected sherds, osteological analysis and faunal remains.

Mimbres Society

Author: Valli S. Powell-Mart’
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816524815
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Drawing on architecture and pottery, US and Canadian archaeologists explore the organizational complexity of the Mimbres people before, during, and after the Classic period, AD 1000-1130, in the southwestern US. They use architectural data to provide insight into family, household, communal, and community structure and also to complement analysis of the composition and design of the painted pottery that the Mimbres are best known for.

Mimbres Archaeology at the NAN Ranch Ruin

Author: Harry J. Shafer
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826322043
Format: PDF, Docs
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Following two decades of excavations and research at the NAN Ranch Ruin in southwestern New Mexico, Harry Shafer offers new information and interpretations of the rise and disappearance of the ancient Mimbres culture that thrived in the area from about A.D. 600 to 1140. The NAN Ranch site gives evidence of a fascinating restructuring of Mimbres culture and society, owing to the introduction of irrigation agriculture in the late ninth century. The social restructuring that accompanied this shift in technology resulted in changes that are visible in architecture, mortuary practices, and ceramic decoration. The NAN Ranch ruin has yielded the largest body of evidence ever gathered at a single Mimbres site and thus offers the clearest picture to date of who the ancient Mimbreños were in relation to their Anasazi and Hohokam neighbors to the north and east. Shafer introduces us to the Mimbres people, gives a history of archaeological research in the Mimbres Valley, and traces the occupation of the NAN Ranch site from pithouses to classic pueblo to abandonment. Social customs, subsistence, biological information, and the symbolism of the distinctive Mimbres designs in their ceramics, pottery, stone artifacts, textiles, and jewelry are all addressed in this comprehensive survey.

Southwestern Pottery

Author: Allan Hayes
Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing
ISBN: 1589798627
Format: PDF, Docs
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When this book first appeared in 1996, it was “Pottery 101,” a basic introduction to the subject. It served as an art book, a history book, and a reference book, but also fun to read, beautiful to look at, and filled with good humor and good sense. After twenty years of faithful service, it’s been expanded and brought up-to-date with photographs of more than 1,600 pots from more than 1,600 years. It shows every pottery-producing group in the Southwest, complete with maps that show where each group lives. Now updated, rewritten, and re-photographed, it's a comprehensive study as well as a basic introduction to the art.

The Oxford Handbook of Southwest Archaeology

Author: Barbara Mills
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199978425
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The American Southwest is one of the most important archaeological regions in the world, with many of the best-studied examples of hunter-gatherer and village-based societies. Research has been carried out in the region for well over a century, and during this time the Southwest has repeatedly stood at the forefront of the development of new archaeological methods and theories. Moreover, research in the Southwest has long been a key site of collaboration between archaeologists, ethnographers, historians, linguists, biological anthropologists, and indigenous intellectuals. This volume marks the most ambitious effort to take stock of the empirical evidence, theoretical orientations, and historical reconstructions of the American Southwest. Over seventy top scholars have joined forces to produce an unparalleled survey of state of archaeological knowledge in the region. Themed chapters on particular methods and theories are accompanied by comprehensive overviews of the culture histories of particular archaeological sequences, from the initial Paleoindian occupation, to the rise of a major ritual center in Chaco Canyon, to the onset of the Spanish and American imperial projects. The result is an essential volume for any researcher working in the region as well as any archaeologist looking to take the pulse of contemporary trends in this key research tradition.

Zuni Origins

Author: David A. Gregory
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816528934
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The Zuni are a Southwestern people whose origins have long intrigued anthropologists. This volume presents fresh approaches to that question from both anthropological and traditional perspectives, exploring the origins of the tribe and the influences that have affected their way of life. Utilizing macro-regional approaches, it brings together many decades of research in the Zuni and Mogollon areas, incorporating archaeological evidence, environmental data, and linguistic analyses to propose new links among early Southwestern peoples. The findings reported here postulate the differentiation of the Zuni language at least 7,000 to 8,000 years ago, following the initial peopling of the hemisphere, and both formulate and test the hypothesis that many Mogollon populations were Zunian speakers. Some of the contributions situate Zuni within the developmental context of Southwestern societies from Paleoindian to Mogollon. Others test the Mogollon-Zuni hypothesis by searching for contrasts between these and neighboring peoples and tracing these contrasts through macro-regional analyses of environments, sites, pottery, basketry, and rock art. Several studies of late prehistoric and protohistoric settlement systems in the Zuni area then express more cautious views on the Mogollon connection and present insights from Zuni traditional history and cultural geography. Two internationally known scholars then critique the essays, and the editors present a new research design for pursuing the question of Zuni origins. By taking stock and synthesizing what is currently known about the origins of the Zuni language and the development of modern Zuni culture, Zuni Origins is the only volume to address this subject with such a breadth of data and interpretations. It will prove invaluable to archaeologists working throughout the North American Southwest as well as to others struggling with issues of ethnicity, migration, incipient agriculture, and linguistic origins. CONTENTS Foreword by William H. Doelle Preface: Constructing and Refining a Research Design for the Study of Zuni Origins David A. Gregory and David R. Wilcox Acknowledgments Part I Large-Scale Contexts for the Study of Zuni Origins: Language, Culture, and Environment 1. Introduction: The Structure of Anthropological Inquiry into Zuni Origins David R. Wilcox and David A. Gregory 2. Prehistoric Cultural and Linguistic Patterns in the Southwest since 5 BC Cynthia Irwin Williams (1967) 3. The Zuni Language in Southwestern Areal Context Jane H. Hill 4. Archaeological Concepts for Assessing Mogollon-Zuni Connections Jeffery J. Clark 5. The Environmental Context of Linguistic Differentiation and Other Cultural Developments in the Prehistoric Southwest David A. Gregory and Fred L. Nials 6. Zuni-Area Paleoenvironment Jeffrey S. Dean Part II Placing Zuni in the Development of Southwestern Societies: From Paleoindian to Mogollon 7. The Archaic Origins of the Zuni: Preliminary Explorations R. G. Matson 8. Zuni Emergent Agriculture: Economic Strategies and the Origins of Zuni Jonathan E. Damp 9. A Mogollon-Zuni Hypothesis: Paul Sidney Martin and John B. RinaldoÕs Formulation David A. Gregory 10. Adaptation of Man to the Mountains: Revising the Mogollon Concept David A. Gregory and David R. Wilcox (1999) 11. Mogollon Trajectories and Divergences Michael W. Diehl Part III Zuni in the Puebloan World: Mogollon-Zuni Connections 12. Zuni in the Puebloan and Southwestern Worlds David R. Wilcox, David A. Gregory, and J. Brett Hill 13. A Regional Perspective on Ceramics and Zuni Identity, AD 200--1630 Barbara J. Mills 14. Mogollon Pottery Production and Exchange C. Dean Wilson 15. R

The Mimbres

Author: Jesse Walter Fewkes
Publisher: Avanyu Pub
ISBN:
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This reissue of three early essays on Mimbres archaeology and design fills a major gap in the literature on the Mimbres, whose pottery has long fascinated students of the prehistoric Southwest. Fewkes, one of the eminent archaeologists of the early twentieth century, introduced Mimbres art to scholars when he published these essays with the Smithsonian Institution between 1914 and 1924, under the titles Archaeology of the Lower Mimbres Valley, New Mexico, Designs on Prehistoric Pottery from the Mimbres Valley, New Mexico,and Additional Designs on Prehistoric Mimbres Pottery.Long out-of-print, these essays represent the first analysis and description of the complex abstract and representational designs that continue to fascinate us 2,000 years after they were painted.

The road to Aztlan

Author: Virginia M. Fields
Publisher: Los Angeles County Museum
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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Published in conjunction with the major exhibition, 'The Road to Aztlan: Art from a Mythic Homeland' explores the art derived from and created about the legendary area that encompasses the American Southwest and portions of Mexico long before they were separated by an international border. The book and accompanying exhibition view Aztlan as a metaphoric centre and allegorical place of origin for the various peoples of the Southwest and Mexico. Cultural interactions between the two areas span two millennia, beginning with maize cultivation, which spread north from Mexico around BC 1200. The book also investigates the relationship between myth and history as expressed in art and material culture of the region's inhabitants over time and the relationship and continuities of cultural practices over the course of the pre-Columbian, colonial, and contemporary eras. Crucial to these changing relationships are aspects of tradition and innovation within cultures as! people sought to negotiate, maintain, and redefine their identities in the face of social disruption.