My Freshman Year

Author: Rebekah Nathan
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780143037477
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Feeling out of touch with her students, an anthropology professor describes how she enrolled as a freshman student at college in order to gain new insight into modern-day undergraduate culture. Reprint. 40,000 first printing.

My Freshman Year

Author: Rebekah Nathan
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101042502
Format: PDF
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After fifteen years of teaching anthropology at a large university, Rebekah Nathan had become baffled by her own students. Their strange behavior—eating meals at their desks, not completing reading assignments, remaining silent through class discussions—made her feel as if she were dealing with a completely foreign culture. So Nathan decided to do what anthropologists do when confused by a different culture: Go live with them. She enrolled as a freshman, moved into the dorm, ate in the dining hall, and took a full load of courses. And she came to understand that being a student is a pretty difficult job, too. Her discoveries about contemporary undergraduate culture are surprising and her observations are invaluable, making My Freshman Year essential reading for students, parents, faculty, and anyone interested in educational policy.

My Freshman Year

Author: Rebekah Nathan
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801443978
Format: PDF, Kindle
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An anthropology professor in her mid-fifties conceals her identity, registers as a freshman, moves into a dorm, and uses her expertise in ethnographic fieldwork to research college life and today's college students.

Coming of Age in New Jersey

Author: Michael Moffatt
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813513591
Format: PDF
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An anthropologist examines student life, including dormitories, friendships, school bureaucracy, hazing, fraternities, and sexual attitudes

How to Survive Your Freshman Year

Author: Mark W. Bernstein
Publisher: Hundreds of Heads Books, LLC
ISBN: 193351261X
Format: PDF, Docs
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"The work is a compilation of advice and stories from hundreds of students at more than 100 colleges across the US, regarding all the important aspects of life as a first-year college student, based on interviews with those students. Topics covered include: leaving home, dormitory life, studying, choosing classes and majors, fraternities, extra-curricular activities, campus food, etc. The work also includes short "expert articles" written by professionals who work with college students. This is the 5th edition of How to Survive Your Freshman Year"--

The Skinny on Your First Year in College

Author: Sean Heffron
Publisher: RAND Media Co
ISBN: 0984441832
Format: PDF, ePub
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When you arrive on campus, spread out in front of you are literally thousands of new things to learn. For most students, it takes months to discover how to successfully navigate in their new environment. Nine months, in fact. September to May: Freshman Year. Now you can have the answers that all freshmen wish they had from the beginning, and you can have them in about an hour. The Skinny on Your First Year in College follows a college freshmen through a series of obstacles - some he was prepared for, others he was not. Navigating the challenges of college becomes difficult as he watchs how other freshmen try to handle the stress of this new enviroment, but understanding is just outside his window.

Exit Zero

Author: Christine J. Walley
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226871819
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Winner of CLR James Book Prize from the Working Class Studies Association and 2nd Place for the Victor Turner Prize in Ethnographic Writing. In 1980, Christine J. Walley’s world was turned upside down when the steel mill in Southeast Chicago where her father worked abruptly closed. In the ensuing years, ninety thousand other area residents would also lose their jobs in the mills—just one example of the vast scale of deindustrialization occurring across the United States. The disruption of this event propelled Walley into a career as a cultural anthropologist, and now, in Exit Zero, she brings her anthropological perspective home, examining the fate of her family and that of blue-collar America at large. Interweaving personal narratives and family photos with a nuanced assessment of the social impacts of deindustrialization, Exit Zero is one part memoir and one part ethnography— providing a much-needed female and familial perspective on cultures of labor and their decline. Through vivid accounts of her family’s struggles and her own upward mobility, Walley reveals the social landscapes of America’s industrial fallout, navigating complex tensions among class, labor, economy, and environment. Unsatisfied with the notion that her family’s turmoil was inevitable in the ever-forward progress of the United States, she provides a fresh and important counternarrative that gives a new voice to the many Americans whose distress resulting from deindustrialization has too often been ignored. This book is part of a project that also includes a documentary film and interactive website. For more information, and the chance to share your own stories, photos, and artefacts regarding the history of Southeast Chicago, please visit: http://www.exitzeroproject.org/

Jocks and Burnouts

Author: Penelope Eckert
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 9780807770047
Format: PDF
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This ethnographic study of adolescent social structure in a Michigan high school shows how the school's institutional environment fosters the formation of opposed class cultures in the student population, which in turn serve as a social tracking system.

Ancestral Lines

Author: John Barker
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442635940
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This compelling ethnography offers a nuanced case study of the ways in which the Maisin of Papua New Guinea navigate pressing economic and environmental issues. Beautifully written and accessible to most readers, Ancestral Lines is designed with introductory cultural anthropology courses in mind. Barker has organized the book into chapters that mirror many of the major topics covered in introductory cultural anthropology, such as kinship, economic pursuit, social arrangements, gender relations, religion, politics, and the environment. The second edition has been revised throughout, with a new timeline of events and a final chapter that brings readers up to date on important events since 2002, including a devastating cyclone and a major court victory against the forestry industry.

Connecting in College

Author: Janice M. McCabe
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022640952X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Many college students rely on their friends for more than just having fun. But surprisingly, we know very little about what college students friendships look like, or how they might benefit from these friendships, socially and academically, in the short and long term. At a time when only four out of ten students graduate from four-year colleges within four years, understanding friendships may help better assist students and institutions in drawing on friends benefits and avoiding their pitfalls. In this book, sociologist Janice McCabe explores how friendship networks matter for college students lives both during and after college. In doing so, she identifies different types of friendship networksfor instance, the extent to which young people have tight cohesive friendship groups, or move effortlessly through different social circlesand how these networks are associated with social and academic success for students from different race, gender, and class backgrounds. The benefits of friendship are not the same for all friends, and these benefits also are not the same for all students; McCabe finds instead that friendship network type influences how friends matter for students academic and social successes and failures."