My Friends the MacLeans

Author: Jane Duncan
Publisher: Pan Macmillan
ISBN: 1447297989
Format: PDF, ePub
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'Janet, what do you mean? What has been going on between you and that bloody boy?' When Janet Alexander learns that young Roddy Maclean intends to defy his parents and become a writer, not an engineer, she readily helps him run away from St Jago. Her impulsive action infuriates Rob and Marion Maclean, and harsh words end a long friendship. Interwoven with Janet's discovery of deeper currents under the placid surface of the Paradise estate, are unrest among the plantation workers, the convalescence of Twice Alexander, and the advent of Madame Dulac's grandson Edward, who falls more than a little in love with Janet. Not until Roddy unexpectedly returns to the island does Janet come to know the truth about her friends the Macleans . . .

My Five Cambridge Friends

Author: Yuri Modin
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780747247753
Format: PDF, Docs
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It is a story worthy of le Carre --but it is all true. Yuri Modin's account is unique. For the first time ever, the KGB minder of the most notorious double agents of the 20th century reveals the details of their lives and the roles they played in the secret history and politics of our time.

Annie Marion MacLean and the Chicago Schools of Sociology 1894 1934

Author: Mary Jo Deegan
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
ISBN: 1412852889
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Although Annie Marion MacLean, teacher, sociologist, and leader, gained international fame as an expert on working women's issues, her significant contributions are overlooked by contemporary scholarship. MacLean was extraordinary by any standard--her level of education; her precedent-setting behaviors, research, methodological innovations, public impact, and writing; her dedication to women's freedom and social justice; and her love for family and friends. MacLean was a vigorous and creative exponent of the forceful spirit of Chicago sociologists. As a graduate of the department of sociology at the University of Chicago, MacLean became one of the founders of the discipline. MacLean was an ally and friend to other sociologists in Chicago who were both students and faculty at the university and at another world-class institution, the social settlement Hull-House. She gained fame as an expert on working women, using ideas to expand their options and respond to their need for social justice. Mary Jo Deegan documents the life, accomplishments, and works of this noted scholar. Deegan explores such topics as Annie Marion MacLean and sociology at the University of Chicago and Jane Addams' Hull-House, MacLean and feminist pragmatism, women and the sociology of work and occupations, women's labor unions and the feminist pragmatist welfare state, the sociology of immigration and race relations, and MacLean's legacy to sociology and society. Her inspiring story will be of interest to those exploring the roots of the discipline of sociology.

End of the Rope

Author: Jan Redford
Publisher: Counterpoint Press
ISBN: 1640090312
Format: PDF, ePub
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"Cheryl Strayed, move over: End of the Rope is a rambunctious, funny, heartstopping memoir that carries us along on an electric current of risk and courage." —Marni Jackson, Mountain and Wilderness Writing Program, Banff Centre, and author of The Mother Zone In this funny and gritty debut memoir, Jan Redford grows from a nomadic rock climber to a mother who fights to win back her future. As a teenager, in a fit of rage toward her father, Jan pits herself against a steep rock face near their cottage. At the top, fired up by the victory, she sets her sights on the improbable dream of climbing mountains. By age twenty, she’s a nomadic climber with a magnetic attraction to misadventures and the wrong men. Jan finally finds the love of her life, an affable Banff climber. When he is killed in an avalanche in Alaska, a grieving Jan finds comfort in the arms of another extreme alpinist. Before long, they are married, with a baby on the way. While her husband works as a logger and climbs distant peaks, Jan tackles the traditional role of wife and mother. But soon she pursues her own dream, one that pits her against her husband. End of the Rope is Jan’s telling of heart-stopping adventures, from being rescued off El Capitan to leading a group of bumbling cadets across a glacier. It is her laughter-filled memoir of learning to climb, and of friendships with women in that masculine world. Most moving, this is the story of her struggle to make her own way in the mountains and in life. To lead, not follow.

The Village Effect

Author: Susan Pinker
Publisher: Vintage Books Canada
ISBN: 0307359549
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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From birth to death, human beings are hard-wired to connect to other human beings. Social networks matter: tight bonds of friendship and love heal us, help us to learn and remember, extend our lives and make us happy. But not just any social networks: we need the real, face-to-face, in-the-flesh encounters that tie human families, groups of friends and communities together. Marrying the findings of the new field of social neuroscience together with gripping human stories, developmental psychologist Susan Pinker explores the impact of face-to-face contact from cradle to grave, from city to Sardinian mountain village, classroom to workplace, from love to marriage to divorce. Most of us have left the literal village behind, and don't want to give up our new technologies and go back there. But, Pinker writes, we need close social bonds and uninterrupted face-time with our friends and families in order to thrive -- even to survive. Creating our own "village effect" can make us happier. It can also save our lives.

The Knowledge Illusion

Author: Steven Sloman
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0399184341
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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“The Knowledge Illusion is filled with insights on how we should deal with our individual ignorance and collective wisdom.” —Steven Pinker We all think we know more than we actually do. Humans have built hugely complex societies and technologies, but most of us don’t even know how a pen or a toilet works. How have we achieved so much despite understanding so little? Cognitive scientists Steven Sloman and Philip Fernbach argue that we survive and thrive despite our mental shortcomings because we live in a rich community of knowledge. The key to our intelligence lies in the people and things around us. We’re constantly drawing on information and expertise stored outside our heads: in our bodies, our environment, our possessions, and the community with which we interact—and usually we don’t even realize we’re doing it. The human mind is both brilliant and pathetic. We have mastered fire, created democratic institutions, stood on the moon, and sequenced our genome. And yet each of us is error prone, sometimes irrational, and often ignorant. The fundamentally communal nature of intelligence and knowledge explains why we often assume we know more than we really do, why political opinions and false beliefs are so hard to change, and why individual-oriented approaches to education and management frequently fail. But our collaborative minds also enable us to do amazing things. The Knowledge Illusion contends that true genius can be found in the ways we create intelligence using the community around us.