Nations Unbound

Author: Linda Basch
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135307032
Format: PDF
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Nations Unbound is a pioneering study of an increasing trend in migration-transnationalism. Immigrants are no longer rooted in one location. By building transnational social networks, economic alliances and political ideologies, they are able to cross the geographic and cultural boundaries of both their countries of origin and of settlement. Through ethnographic studies of immigrant populations, the authors demonstrate that transnationalism is something other than expanded nationalism. By placing immigrants in a limbo between settler and visitor, transnationalism challenges the concepts of citizenship and of nationhood itself.

Changing Fields of Anthropology

Author: Michael Kearney
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780847693733
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book explores major shifts and reorientations in the recent history of American Anthropology, reflecting the author's vision of what anthropology is and what it has the potential to become. The book engages three fundamental intellectual-political challenges that American anthropology is destined to confront (or at its peril, avoid): becoming more self-reflexive, achieving theoretical and methodological holism, and defense of universal human rights.

La Chulla Vida

Author: Jason Pribilsky
Publisher: Syracuse University Press
ISBN: 9780815631194
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Chronicling the experience of young Andean families as their lives extend between the Ecuadorian highlands and New York City, this book takes an in-depth look at transnational labor migration and gender identities. Jason Pribilsky offers an engrossing and sensitive account of the ways in which young men and women in these two locales navigate their lives, exploring the impact of gender, generation, and new forms of wealth in a single Andean community. transnational labor on the individuals and communities remain largely undocumented. The author draws on firsthand observations of everyday lives to explore issues of transnational marriages and material consumption in the region. Pribilsky presents a study that is both engaging and challenging, a vital contribution to the fields of Latin American studies and immigration studies.

Handbook of International Migration

Author: Steven J. Gold
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113518349X
Format: PDF
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The current era is marked by an unparalleled level of human migration, the consequence of both recent and long-term political, economic, cultural, social, demographic and technological developments. Despite increased efforts to limit its size and consequences, migration has wide-ranging impacts upon social, environmental, economic, political, and cultural life in countries of origin and settlement. Such transformations impact not only those who are migrating, but those who are left behind, as well as those who live in the areas where migrants settle. The Handbook of Migration Studies offers a conceptual approach to the study of international migration, exploring clearly the many modes of exit, reception and incorporation which involve varied populations in disparate political, economic, social and cultural contexts. How do these movements also facilitate the transmission of ideologies and identities, political and cultural practices and economic resources? Uniquely among texts in the subject area, the Handbook also provides a section devoted to exploring methods for studying international migration. Featuring forty-seven essays written by leading international and multidisciplinary scholars, the Routledge International Handbook of Migration Studies offers a contemporary, integrated and comprehensive resource for students and scholars of sociology, politics, human geography, law, history, urban planning, journalism, and health care.

Deciding to be Legal

Author: Jacqueline Maria Hagan
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 9781566392570
Format: PDF
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To study the settlement process of undocumented migrants, Jacqueline Hagan examines one of Houston's Maya communities, the approximately 900 Maya from a township in the Department of Totonicapan, Guatemala. She traces this Maya community from its genesis in 1978, when a few men left the township in search of economic opportunity, to the complex effects of the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA). Based on several years of living and participating in the Totonicapan Maya community in Houston and a visit to the Guatemalan home community, Hagan's research combines interviews, community participation, and observation to evaluate immigration policy. Hagan shows that these immigrants do not passively accept U.S. immigration policy, but instead interpret it and base their actions on their own agenda within the context of their local community. The results, often quite unexpected by national policy makers, question popular myths about the settlement of immigrant communities. The author discusses the different settlement experiences of men and women and the effects of IRCA on family and community structure. Analyzing how legal status influences settlement behavior and international networks, she finds that strong community-based networks and social ties with a home community lead to successful adaptation. Author note: Jacqueline Maria Hagan is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Houston.

Georges Woke Up Laughing

Author: Nina Glick Schiller
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822383233
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Combining history, autobiography, and ethnography, Georges Woke Up Laughing provides a portrait of the Haitian experience of migration to the United States that illuminates the phenomenon of long-distance nationalism, the voicelessness of certain citizens, and the impotency of government in an increasingly globalized world. By presenting lively ruminations on his life as a Haitian immigrant, Georges Eugene Fouron—along with Nina Glick Schiller, whose own family history stems from Poland and Russia—captures the daily struggles for survival that bind together those who emigrate and those who stay behind. According to a long-standing myth, once emigrants leave their homelands—particularly if they emigrate to the United States—they sever old nationalistic ties, assimilate, and happily live the American dream. In fact, many migrants remain intimately and integrally tied to their ancestral homeland, sometimes even after they become legal citizens of another country. In Georges Woke Up Laughing the authors reveal the realities and dilemmas that underlie the efforts of long-distance nationalists to redefine citizenship, race, nationality, and political loyalty. Through discussions of the history and economics that link the United States with countries around the world, Glick Schiller and Fouron highlight the forces that shape emigrants’ experiences of government and citizenship and create a transborder citizenry. Arguing that governments of many countries today have almost no power to implement policies that will assist their citizens, the authors provide insights into the ongoing sociological, anthropological, and political effects of globalization. Georges Woke up Laughing will entertain and inform those who are concerned about the rights of people and the power of their governments within the globalizing economy. “In my dream I was young and in Haiti with my friends, laughing, joking, and having a wonderful time. I was walking down the main street of my hometown of Aux Cayes. The sun was shining, the streets were clean, and the port was bustling with ships. At first I was laughing because of the feeling of happiness that stayed with me, even after I woke up. I tried to explain my wonderful dream to my wife, Rolande. Then I laughed again but this time not from joy. I had been dreaming of a Haiti that never was.”—from Georges Woke Up Laughing

Hep cats Narcs and Pipe Dreams

Author: Jill Jonnes
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801861659
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The history of America's use of drugs from women of the early 1900s who were given opiates for childbirth, to the spread of marijuana and heroin use, to today's use of crack and Xstacy

State Nation Transnation

Author: Katie Willis
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134414080
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This edited volume examines the relationship between the nation and the transnation, focusing on transnational communities in the Asia-Pacific region. Setting the book within a theoretical framework, the authors explore a range of themes such as migration, identity and citizenship in chapters on China, the Philippines, Malaysia, Vietnam, Japan, Indonesia, Australia, Singapore and Cambodia.

The Long Partition and the Making of Modern South Asia

Author: Vazira Fazila-Yacoobali Zamindar
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231511019
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Nation-states often shape the boundaries of historical enquiry, and thus silence the very histories that have sutured nations to territorial states. "India" and "Pakistan" were drawn onto maps in the midst of Partition's genocidal violence and one of the largest displacements of people in the twentieth century. Yet this historical specificity of decolonization on the very making of a nationalized cartography of modern South Asia has largely gone unexamined. In this remarkable study based on more than two years of ethnographic and archival research, Vazira Fazila-Yacoobali Zamindar argues that the combined interventions of the two postcolonial states were enormously important in shaping these massive displacements. She examines the long, contentious, and ambivalent process of drawing political boundaries and making distinct nation-states in the midst of this historic chaos. Zamindar crosses political and conceptual boundaries to bring together oral histories with north Indian Muslim families divided between the two cities of Delhi and Karachi with extensive archival research in previously unexamined Urdu newspapers and government records of India and Pakistan. She juxtaposes the experiences of ordinary people against the bureaucratic interventions of both postcolonial states to manage and control refugees and administer refugee property. As a result, she reveals the surprising history of the making of the western Indo-Pak border, one of the most highly surveillanced in the world, which came to be instituted in response to this refugee crisis, in order to construct national difference where it was the most blurred. In particular, Zamindar examines the "Muslim question" at the heart of Partition. From the margins and silences of national histories, she draws out the resistance, bewilderment, and marginalization of north Indian Muslims as they came to be pushed out and divided by both emergent nation-states. It is here that Zamindar asks us to stretch our understanding of "Partition violence" to include this long, and in some sense ongoing, bureaucratic violence of postcolonial nationhood, and to place Partition at the heart of a twentieth century of border-making and nation-state formation.

Gender and U S Immigration

Author: Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520237391
Format: PDF
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"An important collection of essays that goes beyond the 'immigrant women only' approach to present new perspectives and raise new questions about gender and contemporary U.S. immigration."—Nancy Foner, author of From Ellis Island to JFK: New York's Two Great Waves of Immigration "At last a book that puts gender front and center in debates about the U.S. immigration experience and provides those new to these discussions with an invaluable introduction to the field. Particularly impressive is the substantive breadth of the contributions in this volume, which range from scholarship on the work, family, and political lives of immigrants from all parts of the globe to studies of ethnic, racial, and generational identity. A much needed and essential addition to the bookshelf of any immigration scholar. "—Peggy Levitt, author of The Transnational Villagers "This collection of wonderfully innovative and insightful essays by a distinguished group of social scientists demonstrates the definitive and mutually constitutive connections linking immigration and gender in the contemporary United States. The processes and practices of immigration play a central role in shaping a distinctly gendered distribution of opportunity and suffering, while gendered social structures, preferences, practices, and personal networks play a definitive role in shaping the contours of the immigrant experience and its impact on social, cultural, and economic life."—George Lipsitz, author of American Studies in a Moment of Danger "Hondagneu-Sotelo has assembled some of the foremost scholars in international migration to address the critical yet long-neglected issue of gender. The essays cover topics from employment to motherhood, relate home and host in transnational experiences, and incorporate differences in race, ethnicity, generation, and age in their analyses. A truly remarkable volume."—Lucie Cheng, co-author of Linking Our Lives: Chinese American Women of Los Angeles "Edited by a leading pioneer of immigration studies, this volume offers some of the latest and most brilliant thinking about what migrant men and women bring to the United States, leave behind and create anew. This is a must read for those interested in immigration, gender, and the many meanings of life."—Arlie Russell Hochschild, co-editor with Barbara Ehrenreich of Global Woman: Nannies, Maids, and Sex Workers in the New Economy