New York Murder Mystery

Author: Andrew Karmen
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 081474804X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A leading authority on trends in crime offers an impartial analysis of the dramatic drop in the homicide rate in New York City over the decade of the 1990s, and places the fall in the context of the nation's crime rates. UP.

Bestrafen der Armen

Author: Loïc Wacquant
Publisher: Verlag Barbara Budrich
ISBN: 3847403931
Format: PDF, Docs
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„Dieses Buch ist nicht nur Kampfschrift, sondern auch eine fulminante wissenschaftliche Studie. [...] ‚Die Bestrafung der Armen’ ist keine Polemik, sondern längst Realität. Das gezeigt zu haben, ist Wacquants Verdienst.“ Bayerischer Rundfunk Loïc Wacquant analysiert die öffentliche Mobilmachung zum Thema „Sicherheit“ und die Verschärfung von Strafpraxen als Maßnahmen zur Marginalisierung und Normalisierung unterer Klassen sowie Ablenkungsmanöver in Bezug auf die soziale Frage.

The Great American Crime Decline

Author: Franklin E. Zimring
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195378989
Format: PDF
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Many theories--from the routine to the bizarre--have been offered up to explain the crime decline of the 1990s. Was it record levels of imprisonment? An abatement of the crack cocaine epidemic? More police using better tactics? Or even the effects of legalized abortion? And what can we expect from crime rates in the future? Franklin E. Zimring here takes on the experts, and counters with the first in-depth portrait of the decline and its true significance. The major lesson from the 1990s is that relatively superficial changes in the character of urban life can be associated with up to 75% drops in the crime rate. Crime can drop even if there is no major change in the population, the economy or the schools. Offering the most reliable data available, Zimring documents the decline as the longest and largest since World War II. It ranges across both violent and non-violent offenses, all regions, and every demographic. All Americans, whether they live in cities or suburbs, whether rich or poor, are safer today. Casting a critical and unerring eye on current explanations, this book demonstrates that both long-standing theories of crime prevention and recently generated theories fall far short of explaining the 1990s drop. A careful study of Canadian crime trends reveals that imprisonment and economic factors may not have played the role in the U.S. crime drop that many have suggested. There was no magic bullet but instead a combination of factors working in concert rather than a single cause that produced the decline. Further--and happily for future progress, it is clear that declines in the crime rate do not require fundamental social or structural changes. Smaller shifts in policy can make large differences. The significant reductions in crime rates, especially in New York, where crime dropped twice the national average, suggests that there is room for other cities to repeat this astounding success. In this definitive look at the great American crime decline, Franklin E. Zimring finds no pat answers but evidence that even lower crime rates might be in store.

The PerformanceStat Potential

Author: Robert D. Behn
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 0815725280
Format: PDF, Docs
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It started two decades ago with CompStat in the New York City Police Department, and quickly jumped to police agencies across the U.S. and other nations. It was adapted by Baltimore, which created CitiStat—the first application of this leadership strategy to an entire jurisdiction. Today, governments at all levels employ PerformanceStat: a focused effort by public executives to exploit the power of purpose and motivation, responsibility and discretion, data and meetings, analysis and learning, feedback and follow-up—all to improve government's performance. Here, Harvard leadership and management guru Robert Behn analyzes the leadership behaviors at the core of PerformanceStat to identify how they work to produce results. He examines how the leaders of a variety of public organizations employ the strategy—the way the Los Angeles County Department of Public Social Services uses its DPSSTATS to promote economic independence, how the City of New Orleans uses its BlightStat to eradicate blight in city neighborhoods, and what the Federal Emergency Management Agency does with its FEMAStat to ensure that the lessons from each crisis response, recovery, and mitigation are applied in the future. How best to harness the strategy's full capacity? The PerformanceStat Potential explains all.

Crossing Broadway

Author: Robert W. Snyder
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801455170
Format: PDF, Docs
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In the 1970s, when the South Bronx burned and the promise of New Deal New York and postwar America gave way to despair, the people of Washington Heights at the northern tip of Manhattan were increasingly vulnerable. The Heights had long been a neighborhood where generations of newcomers—Irish, Jewish, Greek, African American, Cuban, and Puerto Rican—carved out better lives in their adopted city. But as New York City shifted from an industrial base to a service economy, new immigrants from the Dominican Republic struggled to gain a foothold. Then the crack epidemic of the 1980s and the drug wars sent Washington Heights to the brink of an urban nightmare. But it did not go over the edge. Robert W. Snyder's Crossing Broadway tells how disparate groups overcame their mutual suspicions to rehabilitate housing, build new schools, restore parks, and work with the police to bring safety to streets racked by crime and fear. It shows how a neighborhood once nicknamed "Frankfurt on the Hudson" for its large population of German Jews became “Quisqueya Heights”—the home of the nation’s largest Dominican community. The story of Washington Heights illuminates New York City’s long passage from the Great Depression and World War II through the urban crisis to the globalization and economic inequality of the twenty-first century. Washington Heights residents played crucial roles in saving their neighborhood, but its future as a home for working-class and middle-class people is by no means assured. The growing gap between rich and poor in contemporary New York puts new pressure on the Heights as more affluent newcomers move into buildings that once sustained generations of wage earners and the owners of small businesses. Crossing Broadway is based on historical research, reporting, and oral histories. Its narrative is powered by the stories of real people whose lives illuminate what was won and lost in northern Manhattan’s journey from the past to the present. A tribute to a great American neighborhood, this book shows how residents learned to cross Broadway—over the decades a boundary that has separated black and white, Jews and Irish, Dominican-born and American-born—and make common cause in pursuit of one of the most precious rights: the right to make a home and build a better life in New York City.

Ed Koch and the Rebuilding of New York City

Author: Jonathan Soffer
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231520905
Format: PDF, Docs
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In 1978, Ed Koch assumed control of a city plagued by filth, crime, bankruptcy, and racial tensions. By the end of his mayoral run in 1989 and despite the Wall Street crash of 1987, his administration had begun rebuilding neighborhoods and infrastructure. Unlike many American cities, Koch's New York was growing, not shrinking. Gentrification brought new businesses to neglected corners and converted low-end rental housing to coops and condos. Nevertheless, not all the changes were positive AIDS, crime, homelessness, and violent racial conflict increased, marking a time of great, if somewhat uneven, transition. For better or worse, Koch's efforts convinced many New Yorkers to embrace a new political order subsidizing business, particularly finance, insurance, and real estate, and privatizing public space. Each phase of the city's recovery required a difficult choice between moneyed interests and social services, forcing Koch to be both a moderate and a pragmatist as he tried to mitigate growing economic inequality. Throughout, Koch's rough rhetoric (attacking his opponents as "crazy," "wackos," and "radicals") prompted charges of being racially divisive. The first book to recast Koch's legacy through personal and mayoral papers, authorized interviews, and oral histories, this volume plots a history of New York City through two rarely studied yet crucial decades: the bankruptcy of the 1970s and the recovery and crash of the 1980s.

Crime Victims An Introduction to Victimology

Author: Andrew Karmen
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1133049729
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A first in the field when initially published and now a true classic, CRIME VICTIMS: AN INTRODUCTION TO VICTIMOLOGY, Eighth Edition offers the most comprehensive and balanced exploration of victimology available today. The author examines the victims’ plight, carefully placing statistics from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report and Bureau of Justice Statistics National Crime Victimization Survey in context. The text systematically investigates how victims are currently handled by the criminal justice system, analyzes the goals of the victims’ rights movement, and discusses what the future is likely to hold. This Eighth edition expands coverage of human trafficking, crimes on campus, identity theft, stalking, motor vehicle theft, prison attacks, and similar high-profile issues. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Rethinking the Urban Agenda

Author: John H. Mollenkopf
Publisher: Century Foundation
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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The culmination of a year-long lecture series cosponsored by The Century Foundation and the City University of New York Graduate Center's Center for Urban Research, 'Rethinking the Urban Agenda' takes up the challenge provided by a changing of the guard in New York City government-the election of a new mayor and city council-to outline a new conceptual and political road map for New York City's future and, in many important respects, for the future of urban America.Contributors include Gordon Berlin (Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation), Alan Brinkley, J. Phillip Thompson, and Lawrence D. Brown (Columbia University), Angelo Falcón (Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund), Norman Fruchter and Amy Ellen Schwartz (New York University), Nathan Glazer (Harvard University), Michael Jacobson, (John Jay College), Gregory Mantsios (Queens College), James Parrott (Fiscal Policy Institute), Martha E. Stark (Baruch College), and Doug Turetsky (United Neighborhood Houses).