Nixon Kissinger and U S Foreign Policy Making

Author: Asaf Siniver
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521269520
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The Machinery of Crisis examines for the first time the important role of crisis management in the making of U.S. foreign policy during the Nixon-Kissinger years. Notorious for their tight grip on the machinery of U.S. foreign policy, the book offers a critical account of the manner in which the president and his national security advisor dominated the structures and processes of foreign policy making. By drawing on a wealth of previously classified documents, Siniver reveals the story of the Washington Special Action Group, which managed foreign policy crises in the Nixon administration. In this thoroughly researched account of the performance of Nixon, Kissinger and the Washington Special Actions group in four international crises, Siniver provides a fresh analysis of the important relationship between individuals and the advisory system in the making of U.S. foreign policy during international crisis.

The Flawed Architect

Author: Jussi M. Hanhimaki
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195346749
Format: PDF, ePub
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Henry Kissinger dominated American foreign relations like no other figure in recent history. He negotiated an end to American involvement in the Vietnam War, opened relations with Communist China, and orchestrated d?tente with the Soviet Union. Yet he is also the man behind the secret bombing of Cambodia and policies leading to the overthrow of Chile's President Salvador Allende. Which is more accurate, the picture of Kissinger the skilled diplomat or Kissinger the war criminal? In The Flawed Architect, the first major reassessment of Kissinger in over a decade, historian Jussi Hanhimaki paints a subtle, carefully composed portrait of America's most famous and infamous statesman. Drawing on extensive research from newly declassified files, the author follows Kissinger from his beginnings in the Nixon administration up to the current controversy fed by Christopher Hitchens over whether Kissinger is a war criminal. Hanhimaki guides the reader through White House power struggles and debates behind the Cambodia and Laos invasions, the search for a strategy in Vietnam, the breakthrough with China, and the unfolding of Soviet-American detente. Here, too, are many other international crises of the period--the Indo-Pakistani War, the Yom Kippur War, the Angolan civil war--all set against the backdrop of Watergate. Along the way, Hanhimaki sheds light on Kissinger's personal flaws--he was obsessed with secrecy and bureaucratic infighting in an administration that self-destructed in its abuse of power--as well as his great strengths as a diplomat. We see Kissinger negotiating, threatening and joking with virtually all of the key foreign leaders of the 1970s, from Mao to Brezhnev and Anwar Sadat to Golda Meir. This well researched account brings to life the complex nature of American foreign policymaking during the Kissinger years. It will be the standard work on Kissinger for years to come.

Secrecy in US Foreign Policy

Author: Yukinori Komine
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 9780754672722
Format: PDF
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Secrecy in US Foreign Policy examines the pursuit of strict secrecy by President Nixon and his National Security Advisor Kissinger in foreign policy decision making in relation to the US rapprochement with China. Newly declassified materials help to identify key questions and highlight the dynamics of events.

U S National Security and Foreign Policymaking After 9 11

Author: M. Kent Bolton
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742559004
Format: PDF, Kindle
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U.S. National Security Policymaking: Present at the Re-Creation examines the external, societal, and governmental sources of change to U.S. national-security policymaking that were begun by 9/11, memorialized by the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act (2004). The manifold changes and what caused them are chronicled and compared to a similar change of trajectory in U.S. national-security that occurred as the Cold War commenced with the National Security Act (1947).

The Yom Kippur War

Author: Asaf Siniver
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199334811
Format: PDF, Mobi
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"A detailed and comprehensive account of the politics, diplomacy and enduring legacy of one of the key conflicts of modern times"--

Diplomacy

Author: Henry Kissinger
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0671510991
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Offering a panoramic view of history and a description of firsthand diplomatic encounters, the former Secretary of State describes his ideas about diplomacy and power balances, showing how national negotiating styles influence outcomes

Making American Foreign Policy

Author: Ole Holsti
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136084509
Format: PDF, ePub
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Ole Holsti, one of the deans of US foreign policy analysis, examines the complex factors involved in the policy decision-making process including the beliefs and cognitive processes of foreign policy leaders and the influence public opinion has on foreign policy. The essays, in addition to being both theoretically and empirically rich, are historical in breadth--with essays on Vietnam--as well as contemporary in relevance--with essays on public opinion and foreign policy after 9/11.

Intelligence and U S Foreign Policy

Author: Paul R. Pillar
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231527802
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A career of nearly three decades with the CIA and the National Intelligence Council showed Paul R. Pillar that intelligence reforms, especially measures enacted since 9/11, can be deeply misguided. They often miss the sources that underwrite failed policy and misperceive our ability to read outside influences. They also misconceive the intelligence-policy relationship and promote changes that weaken intelligence-gathering operations. In this book, Pillar confronts the intelligence myths Americans have come to rely on to explain national tragedies, including the belief that intelligence drives major national security decisions and can be fixed to avoid future failures. Pillar believes these assumptions waste critical resources and create harmful policies, diverting attention away from smarter reform, and they keep Americans from recognizing the limits of obtainable knowledge. Pillar revisits U.S. foreign policy during the Cold War and highlights the small role intelligence played in those decisions, and he demonstrates the negligible effect that America's most notorious intelligence failures had on U.S. policy and interests. He then reviews in detail the events of 9/11 and the 2003 invasion of Iraq, condemning the 9/11 commission and the George W. Bush administration for their portrayals of the role of intelligence. Pillar offers an original approach to better informing U.S. policy, which involves insulating intelligence management from politicization and reducing the politically appointed layer in the executive branch to combat slanted perceptions of foreign threats. Pillar concludes with principles for adapting foreign policy to inevitable uncertainties.