The Paradox of Plenty

Author: Terry Lynn Karl
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520918696
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The Paradox of Plenty explains why, in the midst of two massive oil booms in the 1970s, oil-exporting governments as different as Venezuela, Iran, Nigeria, Algeria, and Indonesia chose common development paths and suffered similarly disappointing outcomes. Meticulously documented and theoretically innovative, this book illuminates the manifold factors—economic, political, and social—that determine the nature of the oil state, from the coherence of public bureaucracies, to the degree of centralization, to patterns of policy-making. Karl contends that oil countries, while seemingly disparate, are characterized by similar social classes and patterns of collective action. In these countries, dependence on petroleum leads to disproportionate fiscal reliance on petrodollars and public spending, at the expense of statecraft. Oil booms, which create the illusion of prosperity and development, actually destabilize regimes by reinforcing oil-based interests and further weakening state capacity. Karl's incisive investigation unites structural and choice-based approaches by illuminating how decisions of policymakers are embedded in institutions interacting with domestic and international markets. This approach—which Karl dubs "structured contingency"—uses a state's leading sector as the starting point for identifying a range of decision-making choices, and ends by examining the dynamics of the state itself.

Paradox of Plenty

Author: Harvey A. Levenstein
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520234406
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book is intended for those interested in US food habits and diets during the 20th century, American history, American social life and customs.

lfonds als Ausweg aus dem Paradox of Plenty Der Oil Revenue Management Plan des Tschad

Author: Anonym
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3656112584
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Studienarbeit aus dem Jahr 2005 im Fachbereich Politik - Internationale Politik - Thema: Entwicklungspolitik, Note: 1,7, Universitat Hamburg (Institut fur Politische Wissenschaft), Veranstaltung: Hauptseminar 05.381: 'Paradox of Plenty?' Ressourcenreichtum und Entwicklung, 16 Quellen im Literaturverzeichnis, Sprache: Deutsch, Abstract: Einleitung Die Wechselbeziehung zwischen Ressourcenreichtum und gehemmter oder sogar negativer Entwicklung ist vor allem fur Staaten mit schwachen Institutionen und fehlenden demokratischen Gesellschaftsstrukturen vielfach belegt worden. Dies gilt insbesondere fur Entwicklungslander, deren vornehmliche Ressource Ol ist.1 Daruber hinaus gehort die Mehrzahl der von Olexporten besonders abhangigen Lander zu den aus politischer Sicht unstetigsten Staaten der Erde, die sich obendrein noch als besonders konflikttrachtig herauskristallisiert haben.2 Mit dem Beginn der industrialisierten Olforderung in den Staaten am Golf von Guinea in den letzten zwei Jahrzehnten ist diese The matik wieder auf eine breite entwicklungspolitische Agenda geruckt. Von besonderer Brisanz ist hier der riesige Kapitalschub, der in den frischgebackenen Olexportstaaten Afrikas auf zumeist weitgehend unfertige Strukturen moderner Staatlichkeit trifft. Ein Losungsansatz - unter vielen anderen - diesem Ressourcenfluch" entgegenzuwirken, ist der Aufbau von Olfonds - finanzpolitische Institutionen, die neben einer makrookonomischen Stabilisierung eine sinnvolle und gerechte Verteilung der Olgewinne ermoglichen sollen. Einen exemplarischen Landerfall stellt in diesem Zusammenhang der Tschad dar, ein Entwicklungsland der untersten Regionen einer jeden globalen Armuts- und Korruptionsstatistik, in dem seit Juli 2003 Ol exportiert wird. Von Besonderheit ist hier die harte Konditionierung von Seiten der Weltbank im Rahmen eines Fondskonzepts. In dieser Arbeit soll nach dem politischen Potential von Olfonds zur Be"

The Paradox of Plenty

Author: Douglas H. Boucher
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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"Since its founding in 1975, Food First/Institute for Food and Development Policy has been in the forefront of the struggle to end world hunger. Through its research, Food First has shown that there is more than enough food for every man, woman, and child on the planet, but all too often the poor do not have access to that food. The Paradox of Plenty gathers together excerpts from twenty-seven of Food First's best writings to provide an integrated overview of the world food system, how global politics affect hungry people, and the impact of the free market."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Vitamania

Author: Catherine Price
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698192214
Format: PDF, ePub
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"A hidden, many-faceted, and urgent story." --Booklist, *STARRED* Most of us know nothing about vitamins. What’s more, what we think we know is harming both our personal nutrition and our national health. By focusing on vitamins at the expense of everything else, we’ve become blind to the bigger picture: despite our belief that vitamins are an absolute good—and the more of them, the better—vitamins are actually small and surprisingly mysterious pieces of a much larger nutritional puzzle. In Vitamania, award-winning journalist Catherine Price offers a lucid and lively journey through our cherished yet misguided beliefs about vitamins, and reveals a straightforward, blessedly anxiety-free path to enjoyable eating and good health. When vitamins were discovered a mere century ago, they changed the destiny of the human species by preventing and curing many terrifying diseases. Yet it wasn’t long before vitamins spread from labs of scientists into the realm of food marketers and began to take on a life of their own. By the end of the Second World War, vitamins were available in forms never before seen in nature—vitamin gum, vitamin doughnuts, even vitamin beer—and their success showed food manufacturers that adding synthetic vitamins to otherwise nutritionally empty products could convince consumers that they were healthy. The era of “vitamania,” as one 1940s journalist called it, had begun. Though we’ve gained much from our embrace of vitamins, what we’ve lost is a crucial sense of perspective. Vitamins may be essential to our lives, but they are not the only important substances in food. By buying into a century of hype and advertising, we have accepted the false idea that particular dietary chemicals can be used as shortcuts to health—whether they be antioxidants or omega-3s or, yes, vitamins. And it’s our vitamin-inspired desire for effortless shortcuts that created today’s dietary supplement industry, a veritable Wild West of overpromising “miracle” substances that can be legally sold without any proof that they are effective or safe. For the countless individuals seeking to maximize their health and who consider vitamins to be the keys to well-being, Price’s Vitamania will be a game-changing look into the roots of America’s ongoing nutritional confusion. Her travels to vitamin manufacturers and food laboratories and military testing kitchens—along with her deep dive into the history of nutritional science— provide a witty and dynamic narrative arc that binds Vitamania together. The result is a page-turning exploration of the history, science, hype, and future of nutrition. And her ultimate message is both inspiring and straightforward: given all that we don’t know about vitamins and nutrition, the best way to decide what to eat is to stop obsessing and simply embrace this uncertainty head-on. By exposing our extraordinary psychological rela¬tionship with vitamins and challenging us to question our beliefs, Vitamania won’t just change the way we think about vitamins. It will change the way we think about food. From the Hardcover edition.

Nature s Perfect Food

Author: E. Melanie Dupuis
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814719374
Format: PDF, ePub
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For over a century, America's nutrition authorities have heralded milk as "nature's perfect food," as "indispensable" and "the most complete food." These milk "boosters" have ranged from consumer activists, to government nutritionists, to the American Dairy Council and its ubiquitous milk moustache ads. The image of milk as wholesome and body-building has a long history, but is it accurate? Recently, within the newest social movements around food, milk has lost favor. Vegan anti-milk rhetoric portrays the dairy industry as cruel to animals and milk as bad for humans. Recently, books with titles like, "Milk: The Deadly Poison," and "Don't Drink Your Milk" have portrayed milk as toxic and unhealthy. Controversies over genetically-engineered cows and questions about antibiotic residue have also prompted consumers to question whether the milk they drink each day is truly good for them. In Nature's Perfect Food Melanie Dupuis illuminates these questions by telling the story of how Americans came to drink milk. We learn how cow's milk, which was associated with bacteria and disease became a staple of the American diet. Along the way we encounter 19th century evangelists who were convinced that cow's milk was the perfect food with divine properties, brewers whose tainted cow feed poisoned the milk supply, and informal wetnursing networks that were destroyed with the onset of urbanization and industrialization. Informative and entertaining, Nature's Perfect Food will be the standard work on the history of milk.