Plato Was Wrong

Author: David Shapiro, co-author of several articles published in Journal of Traumatic Stress; President of PTSD Relief Now, www.ptsdreliefnow.org
Publisher: R&L Education
ISBN: 161048620X
Format: PDF
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This book is a compendium of lesson plans for classroom exercises designed to foster philosophical inquiry with young people. It introduces the reader to a wide range of activities for exploring philosophical questions and problems with children from pre-school age through high-school.

Plato was Wrong

Author: David A. Shapiro
Publisher: R & L Education
ISBN: 9781610486194
Format: PDF
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This book is a compendium of lesson plans for classroom exercises designed to foster philosophical inquiry with young people. It introduces the reader to a wide range of activities for exploring philosophical questions and problems with children from preschool age through high-school. There are lessons for a full-range of topics in philosophy, including metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and aesthetics, and each is intended to help foster a supportive and caring classroom community of inquiry. All of the activities have been used on numerous occasions and include reflections on what teachers who employ the lesson might expect when doing so. Using this book, teachers, parents, and others can successfully being fostering philosophical inquiry with young people of all ages.

Philosophy and Education

Author: Roberta Israeloff
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443845590
Format: PDF, Docs
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Are children natural philosophers? They are curious about questions such as the meaning and purpose of being alive and whether we can know anything at all. Pre-college philosophy takes as a starting point young people’s inherent interest in large questions about the human condition. Philosophy and Education: Introducing Philosophy to Young People seeks to illuminate the ways in which philosophy can strengthen and deepen pre-college education. The book examines various issues involved in teaching philosophy to young people at different grade levels, including assessing what teachers need in order to teach philosophy and describing several models for introducing philosophy into schools. Ways to explore specific branches of philosophy – ethics, epistemology, metaphysics, aesthetics, and logic – through literature, thought experiments, and games and activities, as well as traditional philosophy texts, are described. The book’s final section considers student assessment and program evaluation, and analyzes the contributions pre-college philosophy can make to education in general. Teachers and educators – and parents – all want young people to grow up with the skills they need to pursue their own goals and become productive and successful adults. Thinking independently and reasoning clearly are central to these objectives. Philosophy helps students develop some of the analytic skills they need to engage in thoughtful decision-making throughout their lives, and the richness of the questions involved can help young people maintain their awareness of the world as marvelous and mysterious.

Ethics and Children s Literature

Author: Dr Claudia Mills
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1472440722
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Exploring the ethical questions posed by, in, and about children’s literature, this collection examines the way texts intended for children raise questions of value, depict the moral development of their characters, and call into attention shared moral presuppositions. Even as children’s literature has evolved in opposition to its origins in didactic Sunday school tracts and moralizing fables, authors, parents, librarians, and scholars remain sensitive to the values conveyed to children through the texts they choose to share with them.

Plato s Laches Text

Author: Plato
Publisher: Agora Publications, Inc.
ISBN: 1887250689
Format: PDF, Docs
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Laches, a general in the Athenian army, saw Socrates fight bravely in the battle of Delium. When he and Nicias, another general, are asked to explain the idea of courage, they are at a loss and words fail them. How does courage differ from thoughtless and reckless audacity? Can a lion be said to be courageous? What about small children who have little idea of the dangers they face? Should we call people courageous who do not know whether their bravery will produce good or bad consequences? What kind of education and training promotes both courage and goodness in people, whether they are young or old?