Power Lines

Author: Andrew Needham
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400852404
Format: PDF
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In 1940, Phoenix was a small, agricultural city of sixty-five thousand, and the Navajo Reservation was an open landscape of scattered sheepherders. Forty years later, Phoenix had blossomed into a metropolis of 1.5 million people and the territory of the Navajo Nation was home to two of the largest strip mines in the world. Five coal-burning power plants surrounded the reservation, generating electricity for export to Phoenix, Los Angeles, and other cities. Exploring the postwar developments of these two very different landscapes, Power Lines tells the story of the far-reaching environmental and social inequalities of metropolitan growth, and the roots of the contemporary coal-fueled climate change crisis. Andrew Needham explains how inexpensive electricity became a requirement for modern life in Phoenix—driving assembly lines and cooling the oppressive heat. Navajo officials initially hoped energy development would improve their lands too, but as ash piles marked their landscape, air pollution filled the skies, and almost half of Navajo households remained without electricity, many Navajos came to view power lines as a sign of their subordination in the Southwest. Drawing together urban, environmental, and American Indian history, Needham demonstrates how power lines created unequal connections between distant landscapes and how environmental changes associated with suburbanization reached far beyond the metropolitan frontier. Needham also offers a new account of postwar inequality, arguing that residents of the metropolitan periphery suffered similar patterns of marginalization as those faced in America's inner cities. Telling how coal from Indian lands became the fuel of modernity in the Southwest, Power Lines explores the dramatic effects that this energy system has had on the people and environment of the region.

The Grid

Author: Julie A Cohn
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262037173
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The history of the grid, the world's largest interconnected power machine that is North America's electricity infrastructure.

Guided by the Mountains

Author: Michael Lerma
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190639873
Format: PDF, Docs
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What do traditional Indigenous institutions of governance offer to our understanding of the contemporary challenges faced by the Navajo Nation today and tomorrow? Guided by the Mountains looks at the tensions between Indigenous political philosophy and the challenges faced by Indigenous nations in building political institutions that address contemporary problems and enact "good governance." Specifically, it looks at Navajo, or Diné, political thought, focusing on traditional Diné institutions that offer "a new (old) understanding of contemporary governance challenges" facing the Navajo Nation. Arguing not only for the existence but also the persistence of traditional Navajo political thought and policy, Guided by the Mountains asserts that "traditional" Indigenous philosophy provides a model for creating effective governance institutions that address current issues faced by Indigenous nations. Incorporating both visual interpretations and narrative accounts of traditional and contemporary Diné institutions of government from Diné philosophers, the book is the first to represent Indigenous philosophy as the foundation behind traditional and contemporary governance. It also explains how Diné governance institutions operated during Pre-Contact and Post-Contact times. This path-breaking book stands as the first-time normative account of Diné philosophy.

Getting Tough

Author: Julilly Kohler-Hausmann
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400885183
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The politics and policies that led to America's expansion of the penal system and reduction of welfare programs In 1970s America, politicians began "getting tough" on drugs, crime, and welfare. These campaigns helped expand the nation's penal system, discredit welfare programs, and cast blame for the era's social upheaval on racialized deviants that the state was not accountable to serve or represent. Getting Tough sheds light on how this unprecedented growth of the penal system and the evisceration of the nation's welfare programs developed hand in hand. Julilly Kohler-Hausmann shows that these historical events were animated by struggles over how to interpret and respond to the inequality and disorder that crested during this period. When social movements and the slowing economy destabilized the U.S. welfare state, politicians reacted by repudiating the commitment to individual rehabilitation that had governed penal and social programs for decades. In its place, they championed strategies of punishment, surveillance, and containment. The architects of these tough strategies insisted they were necessary, given the failure of liberal social programs and the supposed pathological culture within poor African American and Latino communities. Kohler-Hausmann rejects this explanation and describes how the spectacle of enacting punitive policies convinced many Americans that social investment was counterproductive and the "underclass" could be managed only through coercion and force. Getting Tough illuminates this narrative through three legislative cases: New York's adoption of the 1973 Rockefeller drug laws, Illinois's and California's attempts to reform welfare through criminalization and work mandates, and California's passing of a 1976 sentencing law that abandoned rehabilitation as an aim of incarceration. Spanning diverse institutions and weaving together the perspectives of opponents, supporters, and targets of punitive policies, Getting Tough offers new interpretations of dramatic transformations in the modern American state.

Landscapes of Power

Author: Dana E. Powell
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822372290
Format: PDF, ePub
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In Landscapes of Power Dana E. Powell examines the rise and fall of the controversial Desert Rock Power Plant initiative in New Mexico to trace the political conflicts surrounding native sovereignty and contemporary energy development on Navajo (Diné) Nation land. Powell's historical and ethnographic account shows how the coal-fired power plant project's defeat provided the basis for redefining the legacies of colonialism, mineral extraction, and environmentalism. Examining the labor of activists, artists, politicians, elders, technicians, and others, Powell emphasizes the generative potential of Navajo resistance to articulate a vision of autonomy in the face of twenty-first-century colonial conditions. Ultimately, Powell situates local Navajo struggles over energy technology and infrastructure within broader sociocultural life, debates over global climate change, and tribal, federal, and global politics of extraction.

Why You Can t Teach United States History without American Indians

Author: Susan Sleeper-Smith
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469621215
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A resource for all who teach and study history, this book illuminates the unmistakable centrality of American Indian history to the full sweep of American history. The nineteen essays gathered in this collaboratively produced volume, written by leading scholars in the field of Native American history, reflect the newest directions of the field and are organized to follow the chronological arc of the standard American history survey. Contributors reassess major events, themes, groups of historical actors, and approaches--social, cultural, military, and political--consistently demonstrating how Native American people, and questions of Native American sovereignty, have animated all the ways we consider the nation's past. The uniqueness of Indigenous history, as interwoven more fully in the American story, will challenge students to think in new ways about larger themes in U.S. history, such as settlement and colonization, economic and political power, citizenship and movements for equality, and the fundamental question of what it means to be an American. Contributors are Chris Andersen, Juliana Barr, David R. M. Beck, Jacob Betz, Paul T. Conrad, Mikal Brotnov Eckstrom, Margaret D. Jacobs, Adam Jortner, Rosalyn R. LaPier, John J. Laukaitis, K. Tsianina Lomawaima, Robert J. Miller, Mindy J. Morgan, Andrew Needham, Jean M. O'Brien, Jeffrey Ostler, Sarah M. S. Pearsall, James D. Rice, Phillip H. Round, Susan Sleeper-Smith, and Scott Manning Stevens.

Fremd in ihrem Land

Author: Arlie Russell Hochschild
Publisher: Campus Verlag
ISBN: 3593507668
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In vielen westlichen Ländern sind rechte, nationalistische Bewegungen auf dem Vormarsch. Wie ist es dazu gekommen? Arlie Russell Hochschild reiste ins Herz der amerikanischen Rechten, nach Louisiana, und suchte fünf Jahre lang das Gespräch mit ihren Landsleuten. Sie traf auf frustrierte Menschen, deren "Amerikanischer Traum" geplatzt ist; Menschen, die sich abgehängt fühlen, den Staat hassen und sich der rechtspopulistischen Tea-Party-Bewegung angeschlossen haben. Hochschild zeigt eine beunruhigende Entwicklung auf, die auch in Europa längst begonnen hat. Hochschilds Reportage ist nicht nur eine erhellende Deutung einer gespaltenen Gesellschaft, sondern auch ein bewegendes Stück Literatur. "Jeder, der das moderne Amerika verstehen möchte, sollte dieses faszinierende Buch lesen." Robert Reich "Ein kluges, respektvolles und fesselndes Buch." New York Times Book Review "Eine anrührende, warmherzige und souverän geschriebene, ungemein gut lesbare teilnehmende Beobachtung. ... Wer ihr Buch liest, versteht die Wähler Trumps, weil sie auf Augenhöhe mit ihnen und nicht über sie spricht." FAZ