Property Rights and Neoliberalism

Author: Laura J. Hatcher
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317074629
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Property rights and efforts to curb state appropriation of private properties for public purposes have always held high status on the political agenda of the US and many other nations that feature a corporate capitalist economic system. In addition to this, over the last several decades conservative libertarian and neo-liberal groups have put constitutional demands for greater property protection on the agendas of courts in several countries. Studying property rights mobilization in both domestic and comparative contexts, the contributors to this volume bring a range of social science perspectives to address three primary issues: the contours and characteristics of property rights mobilizations; the degree to which property rights movements have influenced development of law in demonstrable ways; and the broader cultural, social and economic implications of modern-era property rights litigation and legal mobilizations. This will be a key text for anyone working within or interested in property rights.

The Oxford Handbook of State and Local Government

Author: Donald P. Haider-Markel
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191611964
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Oxford Handbook of State and Local Government is an historic undertaking. It contains a wide range of essays that define the important questions in the field, evaluate where we are in answering them, and set the direction and terms of discourse for future work. The Handbook will have a substantial influence in defining the field for years to come. The chapters critically assess both the key works of state and local politics literature and the ways in which the sub-field has developed. It covers the main areas of study in subnational politics by exploring the central contributions to the comparative study of institutions, behavior, and policy in the American context. Each chapter outlines an agenda for future research.

Ideology in the Supreme Court

Author: Lawrence Baum
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400885361
Format: PDF
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Ideology in the Supreme Court is the first book to analyze the process by which the ideological stances of U.S. Supreme Court justices translate into the positions they take on the issues that the Court addresses. Eminent Supreme Court scholar Lawrence Baum argues that the links between ideology and issues are not simply a matter of reasoning logically from general premises. Rather, they reflect the development of shared understandings among political elites, including Supreme Court justices. And broad values about matters such as equality are not the only source of these understandings. Another potentially important source is the justices' attitudes about social or political groups, such as the business community and the Republican and Democratic parties. The book probes these sources by analyzing three issues on which the relative positions of liberal and conservative justices changed between 1910 and 2013: freedom of expression, criminal justice, and government "takings" of property. Analyzing the Court's decisions and other developments during that period, Baum finds that the values underlying liberalism and conservatism help to explain these changes, but that justices' attitudes toward social and political groups also played a powerful role. Providing a new perspective on how ideology functions in Supreme Court decision making, Ideology in the Supreme Court has important implications for how we think about the Court and its justices.

Impasse in Bolivia

Author: Benjamin Kohl
Publisher: Zed Books
ISBN: 9781842777596
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Bolivia has experienced two decades of unprecedented popular resistance to the consequences of neoliberal policies, resulting in the resignation and flight of its president in October 2003. This unusual book uncovers the reasons and processes behind the rising opposition - mirrored in country after country in Latin America - to this currently fashionable, internationally prescribed approach to economic development. It explores the problems faced by governments in reproducing global strategies at the national level, the tensions between markets and democracy, state restructuring, citizenship and property rights. It points to the problems inherent in retaining neoliberalism as the dominant paradigm in Latin America for the foreseeable future and the unlikely prospect of it putting down real roots of approval and legitimacy.

Neoliberalism and Institutional Reform in East Asia

Author: Meredith Woo-Cumings
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 9780230527348
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In the aftermath of the Asian financial crisis of the late 1990s, international financial institutions suggested various neoliberal quick-fix solutions for reforming economic management within East Asian countries. This book brings together scholars of political economy, law and sociology to interrogate the seemingly unproblematic notions - the rules of law, good corporate governance, and flexible labour market - that inform neoliberal policy prescriptions. It also discusses how these concepts have been translated and practiced in East Asia, exploring the philosophical and empirical bases of the suggested solutions and examining the extent to which they have been followed.

Class in Education Knowledge Pedagogy Subjectivity

Author: Deborah Kelsh
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135203512
Format: PDF
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In contemporary pedagogy, "class" has become one nomadic sign among others: it has no referent but only contingent allusions to similarly traveling signs. Class, that is, no longer explains social conflicts and antagonisms rooted in social divisions of labor, but instead portrays a cultural carnival of lifestyles, consumptions, tastes, prestige and desire, or obscures social conflicts through technicist accounts of incomes and jobs. Class in Education brings back class as a materialist analysis of social inequalities originating at the point of production and reproduced in all cultural practices. Addressing a wide range of issues – from the interpretive logic of the new humanities to racism to reading, school-level curricula to educational policy – the contributors focus on the effects that the different understandings of class have on various sites of pedagogy and open up new spaces for a materialist pedagogy and critical education in the times of globalization and the regimes of the digital.

Trade and environment in the EC and the WTO

Author: Jochem Wiers
Publisher:
ISBN:
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Is a country allowed to prohibit the use of metal beverage cans if it hampers trade from other countries? Can a country impose gasoline quality standards that allow foreign refiners less possibilities to adapt to these standards than domestic refiners? Can it require all wood products sold on its market to carry a label indicating whether they have been sustainably produced or not? These are just some of the questions that have arisen in recent years over the interpretation of trade liberalisation commitments and environmental concerns. This study describes and compares the rules of the European Community and the World Trade Organisation on the liberalisation of trade in goods and measures taken by the members of these organisations for the protection of the environment. It analyses the interpretation of these rules by the European Court of Justice and WTO panels and the Appellate Body, placing them in their institutional context and comparing them. Attention is paid to how the rules relate to Community and international harmonisation, and to the status of trade-restrictive measures that are based on environmentally damaging production methods. This book thus provides useful insights for academics, policy-makers and those who influence policy alike.

Gender and Neoliberalism

Author: Elisabeth Armstrong
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317911423
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This book describes the changing landscape of women’s politics for equality and liberation during the rise of neoliberalism in India. Between 1991 and 2006, the doctrine of liberalization guided Indian politics and economic policy. These neoliberal measures vastly reduced poverty alleviation schemes, price supports for poor farmers, and opened India’s economy to the unpredictability of global financial fluctuations. During this same period, the All India Democratic Women’s Association, which directly opposed the ascendance of neoliberal economics and policies, as well as the simultaneous rise of violent casteism and anti-Muslim communalism, grew from roughly three million members to over ten million. Beginning in the late 1980s, AIDWA turned its attention to women’s lives in rural India. Using a method that began with activist research, the organization developed a sectoral analysis of groups of women who were hardest hit in the new neoliberal order, including Muslim women, and Dalit (oppressed caste) women. AIDWA developed what leaders called inter-sectoral organizing, that centered the demands of the most vulnerable women into the heart of its campaigns and its ideology for social change. Through long-term ethnographic research, predominantly in the northern state of Haryana and the southern state of Tamil Nadu, this book shows how a socialist women’s organization built its oppositional strength by organizing the women most marginalized by neoliberal policies and economics.