Psychological Perspectives on Deafness

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 1317782577
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This edited volume picks up where Psychological Perspectives on Deafness, Volume 1 ended. Composed of review chapters that reflect cutting-edge views from well-known international researchers within the field, this book surveys issues within the field of deafness, such as cognition, learning disabilities, social development, language development, and psychopathology. It also highlights the many new and exciting findings currently emerging from researchers across a variety of disciplines--psychology, education, linguistics, and child development. The chapters will engage, challenge, and lead the field on to productive empirical and theoretical work relating to the broad range of questions which concern the psychological perspectives on deafness.

Deaf People and Society

Author: Irene W. Leigh
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 1315473801
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Deaf People and Society incorporates multiple perspectives related to the topics of psychology, education, and sociology, including the viewpoints of deaf adults themselves. In doing so, it considers the implications of what it means to be deaf or hard of hearing and how deaf adults’ lives are impacted by decisions that professionals make, whether in the clinic, the school, or when working with family. This second edition has been thoroughly revised and offers current perspectives on the following topics: Etiologies of deafness and the identification process The role of auditory access Cognition, language, communication, and literacy Bilingual, bilingual/bimodal, and monolingual approaches to language learning Educational, legal, and placement aspects Childhood psychological issues Psychological and sociological viewpoints of deaf adults The criminal justice system and deaf people Psychodynamics of interaction between deaf and hearing people Each chapter begins with a set of objectives and concludes with suggested readings for further research. This edition contains 10 new and original case studies, including ones on hearing children of deaf adults, sudden hearing loss, a young deaf adult with mental illness, and more. Written by a seasoned deaf/hearing bilingual team, this unique text continues to be the go-to resource for students and future professionals interested in working with deaf and hard-of-hearing persons.

Deaf Cognition

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199709397
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Deaf Cognition examines the cognitive underpinnings of deaf individuals' learning. Marschark and Hauser have brought together scientists from different disciplines, which rarely interact, to share their ideas and create this book. It contributes to the science of learning by describing and testing theories that might either over or underestimate the role that audition or vision plays in learning and memory, and by shedding light on multiple pathways for learning. International experts in cognitive psychology, brain sciences, cognitive development, and deaf children offer a unique, integrative examination of cognition and learning, with discussions on their implications for deaf education. Each chapter focuses primarily on the intersection of research in cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, and deaf education. The general theme of the book is that deaf and hearing individuals differ to some extent in early experience, brain development, cognitive functioning, memory organization, and problem solving. Identifying similarities and differences among these domains provides new insights into potential methods for enhancing achievement in this traditionally under-performing population.

Psychological Development of Deaf Children

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780195115758
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book is the first comprehensive examination of the psychological development of deaf children. Because the majority of young deaf children (especially those with non-signing parents) are reared in language-impoverished environments, their social and cognitive development may differ markedly from hearing children. The author here details those potential differences, giving special attention to how the psychological development of deaf children is affected by their interpersonal communication with parents, peers, and teachers. This careful and balanced consideration of existing evidence and research provides a new psychological perspective on deaf children and deafness while debunking a number of popular notions about the hearing impaired. In light of recent findings concerning manual communication, parent-child interactions, and intellectual and academic assessments of hearing-impaired children, the author has forged an integrated understanding of social, language, and cognitive development as they are affected by childhood deafness. Empirical evaluations of deaf children's intellectual and academic abilities are stressed throughout. The Psychological Development of Deaf Children will be of great interest to students, teachers, and researchers studying deafness and how it relates to speech and hearing; developmental, social, and cognitive psychology; social work; and medicine.

Deaf People

Author: Jean F. Andrews
Publisher: Pearson College Division
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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Deaf People: Evolving Perspectives in Psychology, Sociology, and Education is an examination of the psychology of the Deaf community through history, current topics, and the personal experiences of the three deaf authors. This text provides a unique perspective in that the topic—psychology and deaf people—is typically presented through the hearing person's perspective. The deaf person's perspective as this book demonstrates is important because it is the deaf community that is most impacted by the decisions professionals make, whether in school in the clinic or in the family. Case studies are presented throughout the text to demonstrate real life issues and end of chapter study questions help reinforce chapter concepts.

Deaf Mental Health Care

Author: Neil S. Glickman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136682791
Format: PDF, ePub
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This volume presents a state of the art account of the clinical specialty of mental health care of deaf people. Drawing upon some of the leading clinicians, teachers, administrators, and researchers in this field from the United States and Great Britain, it addresses critical issues from this specialty.

The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies Language and Education Volume 1 Second Edition

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: OUP USA
ISBN: 9780199750986
Format: PDF, Docs
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In this updated edition of the landmark original volume, a range of international experts present a comprehensive overview of the field of deaf studies, language, and education. Written for students, practitioners, and researchers, The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies, Language, and Education, Volume 1, is a uniquely ambitious work that has altered both the theoretical and applied landscapes.

Psychological social and educational dimensions of deafness

Author: Barbara R. Schirmer
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon
ISBN: 9780205175130
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A treatment of the major issues affecting the lives of children, adolescents, and adults who are deaf or hard of hearing, as well as their families. In addition to describing current practice and research, Schirmer (Kent State U.) includes personal essays that illustrate concepts and trends. Intended for professionals and students preparing for roles in education, counseling, rehabilitation, interpreting, and speech and hearing science. Annotation copyrighted by Book News Inc., Portland, OR

A Lens on Deaf Identities

Author: Irene Leigh
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0195320662
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This title explores identity formation in deaf persons. It looks at the major influences on deaf identity, including the relatively recent formal recognition of a deaf culture, the different internalized models of disability and deafness, and the appearance of deaf identity theories in the psychological literature.

Early Literacy Development in Deaf Children

Author: Connie Christine Mayer
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199965692
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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There is a robust body of knowledge suggesting that early language and literacy experiences significantly impact on future academic achievement. In contrast, relatively little has been written with respect to the early literacy development and experiences of deaf children. In Early Literacy Development in Deaf Children, Connie Mayer and Beverly J. Trezek seek to fill this gap by providing an in-depth exploration of how young deaf children learn to read and write, identifying the foundational knowledge, abilities, and skills that are fundamental to this process. They provide an overview of the latest research and present a model of early literacy development to guide their discussion on topics such as teaching reading and writing, curriculum and interventions, bilingualism, and assessment. Throughout, they concentrate on the ways in which young learners with hearing loss are similar to, or different from, their hearing age peers and the consequent implications for research and practice. Their discussion is wide-reaching, as they focus on children from various cultural and linguistic backgrounds, those with additional disabilities and hearing losses ranging from mild to profound, and those using a range of communication modalities and amplification technologies, including cochlear implants. With the implementation of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and advancements in hearing technologies that have heightened both the emphasis on literacy development in the early years and the importance of these years in the ultimate development of age-appropriate reading and reading outcomes, this timely text addresses a topic that has thus far eluded the field.