Psychological Perspectives on Deafness

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 1317782577
Format: PDF, Docs
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This edited volume picks up where Psychological Perspectives on Deafness, Volume 1 ended. Composed of review chapters that reflect cutting-edge views from well-known international researchers within the field, this book surveys issues within the field of deafness, such as cognition, learning disabilities, social development, language development, and psychopathology. It also highlights the many new and exciting findings currently emerging from researchers across a variety of disciplines--psychology, education, linguistics, and child development. The chapters will engage, challenge, and lead the field on to productive empirical and theoretical work relating to the broad range of questions which concern the psychological perspectives on deafness.

The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies Language and Education

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195390032
Format: PDF, ePub
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"In this follow-up volume, Marschark and Spencer have amassed a collection that is impressive in breadth and depth. The research presented here documents the sea-change observable in classrooms and schools for deaf children and is reflected in the variety of chapters...A masterful companion to the original volume." C. Tane Akamatsu, Psychologist, Toronto District School Board --Book Jacket.

Teaching Deaf Learners

Author: Harry Knoors PhD
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190213841
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Teaching Deaf Learners: Psychological and Developmental Foundations explores how deaf students (children and adolescents) learn and the conditions that support their reaching their full cognitive potential -- or not. Beginning with an introduction to teaching and learning of both deaf and hearing students, Knoors and Marschark take an ecological approach to deaf education, emphasizing the need to take into account characteristics of learners and of the educational context. Building on the evidence base with respect to developmental and psychological factors in teaching and learning, they describe characteristics of deaf learners which indicate that teaching deaf learners is not, or should not, be the same as teaching hearing learners. In this volume, Knoors and Marschark explore factors that influence the teaching of deaf learners, including their language proficiencies, literacy and numeracy skills, cognitive abilities, and social-emotional factors. These issues are addressed in separate chapters, with a focus on the importance to all of them of communication and language. Separate chapters are devoted to the promise of multimedia enhanced education and the possible influences of contextual aspects of the classroom and the school on learning by deaf students. The book concludes by pointing out the importance of appropriate education of teachers of deaf learners, given the increasing diversity of those students and the contexts in which they are educated. It bridges the gap between research and practice in teaching and outlines ways to improve teacher education.

Deaf People

Author: Jean F. Andrews
Publisher: Pearson College Division
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Deaf People: Evolving Perspectives in Psychology, Sociology, and Education is an examination of the psychology of the Deaf community through history, current topics, and the personal experiences of the three deaf authors. This text provides a unique perspective in that the topic—psychology and deaf people—is typically presented through the hearing person's perspective. The deaf person's perspective as this book demonstrates is important because it is the deaf community that is most impacted by the decisions professionals make, whether in school in the clinic or in the family. Case studies are presented throughout the text to demonstrate real life issues and end of chapter study questions help reinforce chapter concepts.

Psychological Development of Deaf Children

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780195115758
Format: PDF, Docs
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This book is the first comprehensive examination of the psychological development of deaf children. Because the majority of young deaf children (especially those with non-signing parents) are reared in language-impoverished environments, their social and cognitive development may differ markedly from hearing children. The author here details those potential differences, giving special attention to how the psychological development of deaf children is affected by their interpersonal communication with parents, peers, and teachers. This careful and balanced consideration of existing evidence and research provides a new psychological perspective on deaf children and deafness while debunking a number of popular notions about the hearing impaired. In light of recent findings concerning manual communication, parent-child interactions, and intellectual and academic assessments of hearing-impaired children, the author has forged an integrated understanding of social, language, and cognitive development as they are affected by childhood deafness. Empirical evaluations of deaf children's intellectual and academic abilities are stressed throughout. The Psychological Development of Deaf Children will be of great interest to students, teachers, and researchers studying deafness and how it relates to speech and hearing; developmental, social, and cognitive psychology; social work; and medicine.

Sign Language of the Deaf

Author: I. M. Schlesinger
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 1483271951
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Sign Language of the Deaf: Psychological, Linguistic, and Sociological Perspectives provides information pertinent to the psychological, educational, social, and linguistic aspects of sign language. This book presents the development in the study of sign language. Organized into four parts encompassing 10 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the fascinating account of sign language acquisition by small children. This text then explores the grammar of sign language and discusses the linguistic status of natural and contrived sign languages. Other chapters consider the many peculiarities of the lexicon and grammar of sign language, and its differences in such respects from oral language. This book discusses as well sign language from the angle of psycholinguistics. The final chapter deals with the educational implications of the use of sign language. This book is a valuable resource for linguists and psycholinguists. Readers who are interested in sign language will also find this book useful.

Best Practices in Educational Interpreting

Author: Brenda Chafin Seal
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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Designed for all who work with the heterogeneous population of students with hearing loss, Best Practices in Educational Interpreting, Second Edition, and offers state-of-the-art-and-science information for interpreters in primary through higher education settings. Issues and methods are presented from a practical orientation, with representative cases that illustrate the topics. Best Practices in Educational Interpreting, Second Edition, offers state-of-the-art-and-science information for interpreters in primary through higher education settings. This text is a comprehensive, developmentally organized overview of the process of interpreting in educational settings. Readers learn about the changing needs of the hearing impaired as they move from primary school through college. Designed for all who work with the heterogeneous population of students with hearing loss.

Assessment of Language Disorders in Children

Author: Rebecca J. McCauley
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 1135685940
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This book constitutes a clear, comprehensive, up-to-date introduction to the basic principles of psychological and educational assessment that underlie effective clinical decisions about childhood language disorders. Rebecca McCauley describes specific commonly used tools, as well as general approaches ranging from traditional standardized norm-referenced testing to more recent ones, such as dynamic and qualitative assessment. Highlighting special considerations in testing and expected patterns of performance, she reviews the challenges presented by children with a variety of problems--specific language impairment, hearing loss, mental retardation, and autism spectrum disorders. Three extended case examples illustrate her discussion of each of these target groups. Her overarching theme is the crucial role of well-formed questions as fundamental guides to decision making, independent of approach. Each chapter features lists of key concepts and terms, study questions, and recommended readings. Tables throughout offer succinct summaries and aids to memory. Students, their instructors, and speech-language pathologists continuing their professional education will all welcome this invaluable new resource. Distinctive features include: A comprehensive consideration of both psychometric and descriptive approaches to the characterization of children's language A detailed discussion of background issues important in the language assessment of the major groups of children with language impairment Timely information on assessment of change--a topic frequently not covered in other texts Extensive guidance on how to evaluate individual norm-referenced measures for adoption An extensive appendix listing about 50 measures used to assess language in children A test review guide that can be reproduced for use by readers.

Theoretical Issues in Sign Language Research Volume 2

Author: Patricia Siple
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226251523
Format: PDF, Docs
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The recent recognition of sign languages as legitimate human languages has opened up new and unique ways for both theoretical and applied psycholinguistics and language acquisition have begun to demonstrate the universality of language acquisition, comprehension, and production processes across a wide variety of modes of communication. As a result, many language practitioners, teachers, and clinicians have begun to examine the role of sign language in the education of the deaf as well as in language intervention for atypical, language-delayed populations. This collection, edited by Patricia Siple and Susan D. Fischer, brings together theoretically important contributions from both basic research and applied settings. The studies include native sign language acquisition; acquisition and processing of sign language through a single mode under widely varying conditions; acquisition and processing of bimodal (speech and sign) input; and the use of sign language with atypical, autistic, and mentally retarded groups. All the chapters in this collection of state-of-the-art research address one or more issues related to universality of language processes, language plasticity, and the relative contributions of biology and input to language acquisition and use.