Public Private Partnerships in ADB Education Lending 2000 2009

Author: Asian Development Bank
Publisher: Asian Development Bank
ISBN: 9290921714
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Education is a concern for all, including students, parents, communities, employers, societies, and governments. All stakeholders have a role in providing education services. In this context, the operations of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) in the education sector pursue new and innovative models of education service delivery and financing. Public–private partnerships (PPPs) can contribute to improving the quality and relevance of education, and to raising the cost efficiency of education delivery, including to disadvantaged groups. This report provides a review of PPP models supported by ADB financed education sector projects in the past decade. It is part of broader analytical work being conducted by ADB on PPPs in education that will guide education sector operations in the coming years.

Innovative Strategies for Accelerated Human Resources Development in South Asia

Author: Asian Development Bank
Publisher: Asian Development Bank
ISBN: 929261035X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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South Asia remains one of the fastest-growing regions in the world but concerns are rising that its workforce lacks the skills and education to drive its economy into the 21st century. Providing access to quality education and skills training is now a priority of policymakers in the region. But even though government spending on education has increased significantly in recent years, it has not resulted in effective education outcomes. This report is one in a series of four publications that examines how education and training systems in the region can be improved. In particular, it looks at the role that the private sector can play in improving standards through investments in education and training.

Strengthening Inclusive Education

Author: Asian Development Bank
Publisher: Asian Development Bank
ISBN: 9290920343
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Inclusive education addresses the diverse learning needs of all kinds of learners. It reaches out to excluded groups and goes beyond providing physical access to learning institutions to encompass academic and instructional access to learning concepts. This report clearly presents the development of inclusive education and provides a rationale for strengthening it. The report identifies the various forms of exclusion from education and stresses the patterns of exclusion by subsector and by subregion in Asia and the Pacific. It serves two main purposes: as a strategic and operational guide for the Asian Development Bank and its education sector staff in strengthening inclusive education projects in developing member countries; and as an informative resource for education ministries, institutions, and other stakeholders of education in the region.

The Role and Impact of Public private Partnerships in Education

Author: Harry Anthony Patrinos
Publisher: World Bank Publications
ISBN: 0821379038
Format: PDF, ePub
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The book offers an overview of international examples, studies, and guidelines on how to create successful partnerships in education. PPPs can facilitate service delivery and lead to additional financing for the education sector as well as expanding equitable access and improving learning outcomes.

The Privatization of Education

Author: Antoni Verger
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807774723
Format: PDF, Docs
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Education privatization is a global phenomenon that has crystallized in countries with very different cultural, political, and economic backgrounds. In this book, the authors examine how privatization policies are being adopted and why so many countries are engaging in this type of education reform. The authors explore the contexts, key personnel, and policy initiatives that explain the worldwide advance of the private sector in education, and identify six different paths toward education privatization—as a drastic state sector reform (e.g., Chile, the U.K.), as an incremental reform (e.g., the U.S.A.), in social-democratic welfare states, as historical public-private partnerships (e.g., Netherlands, Spain), as de facto privatization in low-income countries, and privatization via disaster. Book Features: The first comprehensive, in-depth investigation of the political economy of education privatization at a global scale.An analysis of the different strategies, discourses, and agents that have contributed to advancing (and resisting) education privatization trends. An examination of the role of private corporations, policy entrepreneurs, philanthropic organizations, think-tanks, and teacher unions. “Rich in examples, careful in its analysis, important in its conclusions and recommendations for further work, this book is a vital, rigorous, up-to-date resource for education policy researchers.” —Stephen J. Ball, University College London “Few issues are as significant as is education privatization across the globe; few treatments of this issue offer both the breadth and nuanced understanding that this book does.” —Christopher Lubienski, Indiana University

Determinants of Public Private Partnerships in Infrastructure

Author: Mona Hammami
Publisher: International Monetary Fund
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This paper presents an empirical analysis of the cross-country and cross-industry determinants of public-private partnership (PPP) arrangements. We find that PPPs tend to be more common in countries where governments suffer from heavy debt burdens and where aggregate demand and market size are large. Our findings also suggest that macroeconomic stability is essential for PPPs. We provide evidence on the importance of institutional quality, where less corruption and effective rule of law are associated with more PPP projects. PPPs are also more prevalent in countries with previous PPP experiences. At the industry level, we find that PPP determinants vary across industries depending on the nature of public infrastructure, capital intensity, and technology required. We also find that private participation in PPP projects depends on the expected marketability, the technology required, and the degree of "impurity" of the goods or services.