Quelch s Gold

Author: Clifford Beal
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275994075
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In May 1704 an eighty-ton brigantine, the "Charles," quietly slipped into the cove at Marblehead, Massachusetts. Her sudden and unexpected appearance, some ten months after she had left Marblehead under mysterious circumstances, started tongues wagging down at the docks and in the town's dim, cramped, seafront taverns. During the following three weeks, a drama played out involving the crew of the "Charles"; her commander, John Quelch; and the colonial governments of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and New Hampshire. In the hold of the "Charles" lay large quantities of Brazilian sugar, hides, cloth, guns, and gold dust and coins worth more than 10,000 sterling--a huge fortune for the time. This booty and the circumstances of the ship's voyage led to Quelch's arrest on charges of piracy and murder against the subjects of Queen Anne's newest ally, the king of Portugal. One historian called Quelch's trial, the first admiralty trial ever held outside England, "the first case of judicial murder in America." Beyond the lure of the immediate charges, what drew folks to the Quelch case were the first stirrings of American rebellion against English rule, for the mob saw the high-handed treatment of Quelch as an attack on personal liberty and freedom. Whether pirate or privateer, Quelch suffered a travesty of justice, even by the legal standards of the time. His is a dramatic and tragic story about a man caught up in a political world he no longer understands. A legend persists that before they were captured, Quelch's crew buried some of their gold on Star Island off the New Hampshire coast. Every summer to this day the island has continued to attract treasure hunters searching for Quelch's gold. "Quelch's Gold" tells the story behind the legend.

Daily Life in Colonial New England 2nd Edition

Author: Claudia Durst Johnson
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440854661
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This book presents a unique perspective on life in Colonial England, exposing many misconceptions and depicting how elements of its culture that are typically regarded as marginal—such as the activities of pirates—actually had an extensive impact of the populace. • Provides readers with an understanding of the nature of religious sentiment in Colonial America, which was characterized by a desire to have religious freedom for themselves but not for others • Depicts the constant rebellion and subsequent cruelty inherent to colonial society • Examines the majority underclass populations, such as indentured servants, Native Americans, and African Americans • Addresses myths about Puritan women, marriage, sex, and child raising

Pirates of New England

Author: Gail Selinger
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1493029304
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Tales of swashbuckling adventure, murder, treachery, and mayhem! One would be mistaken to think of pirates as roaming only the Caribbean. Pirates as famous as William Kidd and Henry Every have at various times plundered, pillaged, and murdered their way up and down the New England seaboard, striking fear among local merchants and incurring the wrath of colonial authorities. Piracy historian Gail Selinger brings these tales of mayhem and villainy to life while also exploring why New England became such a breeding ground for high seas crime and how the view of piracy changed over time, from winking toleration to brutal crackdown. Included in this volume are: Ned Low’s sadistic—at times cannibalistic—reign of terror on the high seas and his mysterious disappearance. John Quelch’s defiant and unapologetic proclamations before being hanged in front of Boston’s crowds. Henry Every’s daring attack on the Grand Mogul’s fleet, widely considered the largest maritime heist in history. Pirates of New England opens up new chapters in the history of piracy, ones that you’ll come back to again and again—Welcome aboard!

The Golden Age of Piracy

Author: Benerson Little
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 1510713042
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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For thousands of years, pirates have terrorized the ocean voyager and the coastal inhabitant, plundered ship and shore, and wrought havoc on the lives and livelihoods of rich and poor alike. Around these desperate men has grown a body of myths and legends—fascinating tales that today strongly influence our notions of pirates and piracy. Most of these myths derive from the pirates of the “Golden Age,” from roughly 1655 to 1725. This was the age of the Spanish Main, of Henry Morgan and Blackbeard, of Bartholomew Sharp and Bartholomew Roberts. The history of pirate myth is rich in action, at sea and ashore. However, the truth is far more interesting. In The Golden Age of Piracy, expert pirate historian Benerson Little debunks more than a dozen pirate myths that derive from this era—from the flying of the Jolly Roger to the burying of treasure, from walking the plank to the staging of epic sea battles—and shows that the truth is far more fascinating and disturbing than the romanticized legends. Among Little’s revelations are that pirates of the Golden Age never made their captives walk the plank and that they, instead, were subject to horrendous torture, such as being burned or hung by their arms. Likewise, epic sea battles involving pirates were fairly rare because most prey surrendered immediately. The stories are real and are drawn heavily from primary sources. Complementing them are colorful images of flags, ships, and buccaneers based on eyewitness accounts. Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade imprint, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in history--books about World War II, the Third Reich, Hitler and his henchmen, the JFK assassination, conspiracies, the American Civil War, the American Revolution, gladiators, Vikings, ancient Rome, medieval times, the old West, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

Pirates in Their Own Words

Author: E.T. Fox
Publisher: Lulu.com
ISBN: 1291943994
Format: PDF
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Pirates in Their Own Words is a collection of original documents relating to the 'golden age' of piracy. Letters, testimonies, witness accounts and other primary source documents written by the pirates themselves, their victims, and the men who hunted them down.

Death of an Empire

Author: Robert Booth
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9781429990264
Format: PDF, Docs
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SALEM has long been notorious for the witch trials of 1692. But a hundred years later it was renowned for very different pursuits: vast wealth and worldwide trade. Now Death of an Empire tells the story of Salem's glory days in the age of sailing, and the murder that hastened its descent. When America first became a nation, Salem was the richest city in the republic, led by a visionary merchant who still ranks as one of the wealthiest men in history. For decades, Salem connected America with the wider world, through a large fleet of tall ships and a pragmatic, egalitarian brand of commerce taht remains a model of enlightened international relations. But America's emerging big cities and westward expansion began to erode Salem's national political importance just as its seafaring economy faltered in the face of tariffs and global depression. With Salem's standing as a world capital imperiled, two men, equally favored by fortune, struggled for its future: one, a progressive merchant-politician, tried to build new institutions and businesses, while the other, a reclusive crime lord, offered a demimonde of forbidden pleasures. The scandalous trial that followed signaled Salem's fall from national prominence, a fall that echoed around the world in the loss of friendly trade and in bloody reprisals against native peoples by the U.S. Navy. Death of an Empire is an exciting tale of a remarkably rich era, shedding light on a little-known but fascinating period of Ameriacn history in which characters such as Nathaniel Hawthorne, John Quincy Adams, and Daniel Webster interact with the ambitious merchants and fearless mariners who made Salem famous around the world.

Pirate Hunting

Author: Benerson Little
Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.
ISBN: 1597972916
Format: PDF, Docs
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For thousands of years pirates, privateers, and seafaring raiders have terrorized the ocean voyager and coastal inhabitant, plundering ship and shore with impunity. From the victim's point of view, these attackers were not the rebellious, romantic rulers of Neptune's realm, but savage beasts to be eradicated, and those who went to sea to stop them were heroes. Engaging and meticulously detailed, Pirate Hunting chronicles the fight against these plunderers from ancient times to the present and illustrates the array of tactics and strategies that individuals and governments have employed to secure the seas. Benerson Little lends further dimension to this unending battle by including the history of piracy and privateering, ranging from the Mycenaean rovers to the modern pirates of Somalia. He also introduces associated naval warfare; maritime commerce and transportation; the development of speed under oar, sail, and steam; and the evolution of weaponry. More than just a vivid account of the war that seafarers and pirates have waged, Pirate Hunting is invaluable reading in a world where acts of piracy are once more a significant threat to maritime commerce and voyagers. It will appeal to readers interested in the history of piracy, anti-piracy operations, and maritime, naval, and military history worldwide.