Speaking of Race and Class

Author: Elizabeth Aries
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781439909669
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
A sequel to the insightful Race and Class Matters at an Elite College that examines the challenges of diversity from freshman orientation to graduation

The Challenge of Independent Colleges

Author: Christopher C. Morphew
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421424320
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
This book began as a collaboration among top higher education researchers, the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) scholars, and the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC). Documenting the challenges and opportunities facing independent colleges in several integral areas, including public purposes and student engagement, The Challenge of Independent Colleges is informed by the reactions of independent campus presidents and provosts who work every day to act on the opportunities presented by private colleges and universities. Each of the nine chapters is written by a leading higher education scholar and frames highly relevant issues for administrators at independent colleges and universities. Topics range from "Access and Affordability" and "Assessment" to "Ensuring Student Success" and "Institutional Strategy." Each chapter is followed by a short, critical reaction written by a provost or president at a CIC member institution. These reactions demonstrate how the information contained in the chapter might be used by institutional leaders to make decisions and what other information on the chapter’s topic might be useful for leaders at independent colleges and universities. An important resource for higher education scholars and campus leaders, this text will also be a useful addition to courses on education. Contributors: John M. Braxton, Erin B. Ciarimboli, Cynthia Cogswell, Valerie Crespín-Trujillo, Daniel Custer, Richard Dorman, Roger Drake, Richard Ekman, David Guthrie, Harold V. Hartley III, James C. Hearn, Nicholas Hillman, Jillian Kinzie, Mary B. Marcy, Matthew J. Mayhew, Charlie McCormick, Linda McMillin, Christopher C. Morphew, Julie J. Park, Laura W. Perna, Kevin M. Ross, Marc Roy, Laurie Schreiner, Carolyn J. Stefanco, Barrett Taylor, Stephen J. Vassallo, David J. Weerts, Cynthia A. Wells, Letha Zook

College Students Experiences of Power and Marginality

Author: Elizabeth M. Lee
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317664353
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
As scholars and administrators have sharpened their focus on higher education beyond trends in access and graduation rates for underrepresented college students, there are growing calls for understanding the experiential dimensions of college life. This contributed book explores what actually happens on campus as students from an increasingly wide range of backgrounds enroll and share space. Chapter authors investigate how students of differing socioeconomic backgrounds, genders, and racial/ethnic groups navigate academic institutions alongside each other. Rather than treat diversity as mere difference, this volume provides dynamic analyses of how students come to experience both power and marginality in their campus lives. Each chapter comprises an empirical qualitative study from scholars engaged in cutting-edge research about campus life. This exciting book provides administrators and faculty new ways to think about students’ vulnerabilities and strengths.

Getting Real About Race

Author: Stephanie M. McClure
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1483323668
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
Stephanie McClure and Cherise A. Harris’s Second Thoughts on Race in the United States: Hoodies, Model Minorities, and Real Americans is an edited collection of short essays that address the most common misconceptions about race held by students (and by many in the United States, in general)—it is a "one-stop shopping" reader on the racial topics most often pondered by students and derived from their interests and concerns. There is no existing reader that summarizes the research across a range of topics in a consistent, easily accessible format and considers the evidence against particular racial myths in the language that students themselves use.

The Human Rights Enterprise

Author: William T. Armaline
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0745688187
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Why do powerful states like the U.S., U.K., China, and Russia repeatedly fail to meet their international legal obligations as defined by human rights instruments? How does global capitalism affect states’ ability to implement human rights, particularly in the context of global recession, state austerity, perpetual war, and environmental crisis? How are political and civil rights undermined as part of moves to impose security and surveillance regimes? This book presents a framework for understanding human rights as a terrain of struggle over power between states, private interests, and organized, “bottom-up” social movements. The authors develop a critical sociology of human rights focusing on the concept of the human rights enterprise: the process through which rights are defined and realized. While states are designated arbiters of human rights according to human rights instruments, they do not exist in a vacuum. Political sociology helps us to understand how global neoliberalism and powerful non-governmental actors (particularly economic actors such as corporations and financial institutions) deeply affect states’ ability and likelihood to enforce human rights standards. This book offers keen insights for understanding rights claims, and the institutionalization of, access to, and restrictions on human rights. It will be invaluable to human rights advocates, and undergraduate and graduate students across the social sciences.

Class Matters

Author: The New York Times
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9781429956697
Format: PDF
Download Now
The acclaimed New York Times series on social class in America—and its implications for the way we live our lives We Americans have long thought of ourselves as unburdened by class distinctions. We have no hereditary aristocracy or landed gentry, and even the poorest among us feel that they can become rich through education, hard work, or sheer gumption. And yet social class remains a powerful force in American life. In Class Matters, a team of New York Times reporters explores the ways in which class—defined as a combination of income, education, wealth, and occupation—influences destiny in a society that likes to think of itself as a land of opportunity. We meet individuals in Kentucky and Chicago who have used education to lift themselves out of poverty and others in Virginia and Washington whose lack of education holds them back. We meet an upper-middle-class family in Georgia who moves to a different town every few years, and the newly rich in Nantucket whose mega-mansions have driven out the longstanding residents. And we see how class disparities manifest themselves at the doctor's office and at the marriage altar. For anyone concerned about the future of the American dream, Class Matters is truly essential reading. "Class Matters is a beautifully reported, deeply disturbing, portrait of a society bent out of shape by harsh inequalities. Read it and see how you fit into the problem or—better yet—the solution!"—Barbara Ehrenreich, author of Nickel and Dimed and Bait and Switch

Class Warfare

Author: Lois Weis
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022613508X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Stories abound about the lengths to which middle- and upper-middle-class parents will go to ensure a spot for their child at a prestigious university. From the Suzuki method to calculus-based physics, from AP tests all the way back to early-learning Kumon courses, students are increasingly pushed to excel with that Harvard or Yale acceptance letter held tantalizingly in front of them. And nowhere is this drive more apparent than in our elite secondary schools. In Class Warfare, Lois Weis, Kristin Cipollone, and Heather Jenkins go inside the ivy-yearning halls of three such schools to offer a day-to-day, week-by-week look at this remarkable drive toward college admissions and one of its most salient purposes: to determine class. Drawing on deep and sustained contact with students, parents, teachers, and administrators at three iconic secondary schools in the United States, the authors unveil a formidable process of class positioning at the heart of the college admissions process. They detail the ways students and parents exploit every opportunity and employ every bit of cultural, social, and economic capital they can in order to gain admission into a “Most Competitive” or “Highly Competitive Plus” university. Moreover, they show how admissions into these schools—with their attendant rankings—are used to lock in or improve class standing for the next generation. It’s a story of class warfare within a given class, the substrata of which—whether economically, racially, or socially determined—are fiercely negotiated through the college admissions process. In a historic moment marked by deep economic uncertainty, anxieties over socioeconomic standing are at their highest. Class, as this book shows, must be won, and the collateral damage of this aggressive pursuit may just be education itself, flattened into a mere victory banner.

How Minority Students Experience College

Author: Lemuel Warren Watson
Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC.
ISBN: 9781579220495
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
Have three decades of integration and multicultural initiatives in higher education delivered a better education to all students? Do we know what a multicultural campus should look like, and how to design one that is welcoming to all students and promotes a learning environment? Through a unique qualitative study involving seven colleges and universities considered national models of commitment to diversity, this book presents the views and voices of minority students on what has been achieved and what remains to be done.