Race and Empire

Author: Jane Samson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317876040
Format: PDF
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Readers at the beginning of the twenty-first century are probably more racially self-aware than any other generation has been. Like the relationship between gender and history, that between race and history is perceived to be of the utmost importance by young people and the older generation because it has left such a controversial legacy in the shape of hopes for multiculturalism, diversity, and tolerance. This new Seminar Study provides an introduction to the intricate and far-reaching relationship between attitudes toward racial difference and imperial expansion. Imperialism is a topic that can be approached from many different angles. By concentrating on the topical issue of race, this book takes a very different approach from the more familiar political or economic studies of imperial expansion.

Soldiering through Empire

Author: Simeon Man
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520959256
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In the decades after World War II, tens of thousands of soldiers and civilian contractors across Asia and the Pacific found work through the U.S. military. Recently liberated from colonial rule, these workers were drawn to the opportunities the military offered and became active participants of the U.S. empire, most centrally during the U.S. war in Vietnam. Simeon Man uncovers the little-known histories of Filipinos, South Koreans, and Asian Americans who fought in Vietnam, revealing how U.S. empire was sustained through overlapping projects of colonialism and race making. Through their military deployments, Man argues, these soldiers took part in the making of a new Pacific world—a decolonizing Pacific—in which the imperatives of U.S. empire collided with insurgent calls for decolonization, producing often surprising political alliances, imperial tactics of suppression, and new visions of radical democracy.

Race Empire and First World War Writing

Author: Santanu Das
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 052150984X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Drawing upon fresh archival material this book recovers the experience of different ethnic groups during the First World War conflict.

The Cold War 1949 2016

Author: Martin McCauley
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1351818198
Format: PDF, ePub
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Covering the development of the Cold War from the mid-twentieth century to the present day, The Cold War 1949–2016 explores the struggle for world domination that took place between the United States and the Soviet Union following the Second World War. The conflict between these two superpowers shaped global history for decades, and this book examines how this conflict developed into a nuclear arms race, spurred much of the wider world towards war and eventually resulted in the collapse of the Soviet empire. In this accessible yet comprehensive volume, Martin McCauley examines not only the actions of the United States and the Soviet Union but also the effects upon and involvement of other regions such as Africa, Central America, Asia, Europe and the Middle East. Key themes include the Sino-Soviet relationship and the global ambitions of the newly formed People’s Republic of China, the rise and fall of communism in countries such as Cuba, Angola and Ethiopia, the US defeat in Vietnam, the gradual unravelling of the Soviet Union and the changing shape of the post–Cold War world. Providing a wide-ranging overview of the main turning points of the conflict and illustrated throughout with photographs and maps, this is essential reading for all students of the Cold War and its lasting global impact.

Forging Diaspora

Author: Frank Andre Guridy
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807833614
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Cuba's geographic proximity to the United States and its centrality to U.S. imperial designs following the War of 1898 led to the creation of a unique relationship between Afro-descended populations in the two countries. In Forging Diaspora, Frank

Flavors of Empire

Author: Mark Padoongpatt
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520293738
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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With a uniquely balanced combination of salty, sweet, sour, and spicy flavors, Thai food burst onto Los Angeles's culinary scene in the 1980s. Flavors of Empire examines the rise of Thai food and the way it shaped the racial and ethnic contours of Thai American identity and community. Full of vivid oral histories and new material from the archives, this book explores the factors that made foodways central to the Thai American experience. Starting with American Cold War intervention in Thailand, Mark Padoongpatt traces how informal empire allowed U.S. citizens to discover Thai cuisine abroad and introduce it inside the United States. When Thais arrived in Los Angeles, they reinvented and repackaged Thai food in various ways to meet the rising popularity of the cuisine in urban and suburban spaces. Padoongpatt opens up the history, politics, and tastes of Thai food for the first time, all while demonstrating how race emerges in seemingly mundane and unexpected places.

Gender Race and the Writing of Empire

Author: Paula M. Krebs
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521607728
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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All of London exploded on the night of May 18, 1900, in the biggest West End party ever seen. The mix of media manipulation, patriotism, and class, race, and gender politics that produced the 'spontaneous' festivities of Mafeking Night begins this analysis of the cultural politics of late-Victorian imperialism. Paula M. Krebs examines 'the last of the gentlemen's wars' - the Boer War of 1899–1902 - and the struggles to maintain an imperialist hegemony in a twentieth-century world, through the war writings of Arthur Conan Doyle, Olive Schreiner, H. Rider Haggard, and Rudyard Kipling, as well as contemporary journalism, propaganda, and other forms of public discourse. Her feminist analysis of such matters as the sexual honor of the British soldier at war, the deaths of thousands of women and children in 'concentration camps', and new concepts of race in South Africa marks this book as a significant contribution to British imperial studies.

Making Samba

Author: Marc A. Hertzman
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822354306
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In November 1916, a young Afro-Brazilian musician named Donga registered sheet music for the song "Pelo telefone" ("On the Telephone") at the National Library in Rio de Janeiro. This apparently simple act—claiming ownership of a musical composition—set in motion a series of events that would shake Brazil's cultural landscape. Before the debut of "Pelo telephone," samba was a somewhat obscure term, but by the late 1920s, the wildly popular song had helped to make it synonymous with Brazilian national music. The success of "Pelo telephone" embroiled Donga in controversy. A group of musicians claimed that he had stolen their work, and a prominent journalist accused him of selling out his people in pursuit of profit and fame. Within this single episode are many of the concerns that animate Making Samba, including intellectual property claims, the Brazilian state, popular music, race, gender, national identity, and the history of Afro-Brazilians in Rio de Janeiro. By tracing the careers of Rio's pioneering black musicians from the late nineteenth century until the 1970s, Marc A. Hertzman revises the histories of samba and of Brazilian national culture.

New Geographies of Race and Racism

Author: Claire Dwyer
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 9780754670858
Format: PDF, Docs
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This edited collection focuses on research into youth, 'mixed race', identities, intersections of 'race' and ethnicity, and - crucially - has extended the focus from visible 'ethnic minorities' to the theorization and interrogation of whiteness. A key feature of the book is its engagement with a range of methodological approaches to examining the significance of race including ethnography, visual methodologies and historical analysis.

Empire of Liberty

Author: Anthony Bogues
Publisher: UPNE
ISBN: 1584659319
Format: PDF, Mobi
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An original and stimulating critique of American empire