Race and Empire

Author: Jane Samson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317876040
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Readers at the beginning of the twenty-first century are probably more racially self-aware than any other generation has been. Like the relationship between gender and history, that between race and history is perceived to be of the utmost importance by young people and the older generation because it has left such a controversial legacy in the shape of hopes for multiculturalism, diversity, and tolerance. This new Seminar Study provides an introduction to the intricate and far-reaching relationship between attitudes toward racial difference and imperial expansion. Imperialism is a topic that can be approached from many different angles. By concentrating on the topical issue of race, this book takes a very different approach from the more familiar political or economic studies of imperial expansion.

The Cold War 1949 2016

Author: Martin McCauley
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1351818198
Format: PDF
Download Now
Covering the development of the Cold War from the mid-twentieth century to the present day, The Cold War 1949–2016 explores the struggle for world domination that took place between the United States and the Soviet Union following the Second World War. The conflict between these two superpowers shaped global history for decades, and this book examines how this conflict developed into a nuclear arms race, spurred much of the wider world towards war and eventually resulted in the collapse of the Soviet empire. In this accessible yet comprehensive volume, Martin McCauley examines not only the actions of the United States and the Soviet Union but also the effects upon and involvement of other regions such as Africa, Central America, Asia, Europe and the Middle East. Key themes include the Sino-Soviet relationship and the global ambitions of the newly formed People’s Republic of China, the rise and fall of communism in countries such as Cuba, Angola and Ethiopia, the US defeat in Vietnam, the gradual unravelling of the Soviet Union and the changing shape of the post–Cold War world. Providing a wide-ranging overview of the main turning points of the conflict and illustrated throughout with photographs and maps, this is essential reading for all students of the Cold War and its lasting global impact.

The Scramble for Africa

Author: M. E. Chamberlain
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317862554
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
In 1870 barely one tenth of Africa was under European control. By 1914 only about one tenth – Abyssinia (Ethiopia) and Liberia – was not. This book offers a clear and concise account of the ‘scramble’ or ‘race’ for Africa, the period of around 20 years during which European powers carved up the continent with little or no consultation of its inhabitants. In her classic overview, M.E. Chamberlain: Contrasts the Victorian image of Africa with what we now know of African civilisation and history Examines in detail case histories from Egypt to Zimbabwe Argues that the history and background of Africa are as important as European politics and diplomacy in understanding the 'scramble' Considers the historiography of the topic, taking into account Marxist and anti-Marxist, financial, economic, political and strategic theories of European imperialism This indispensible introduction, now in a fully updated third edition, provides the most accessible survey of the ‘scramble for Africa’ currently available. The new edition includes primary source material unpublished elsewhere, new illustrations and additional pedagogical features. It is the perfect starting point for any study of this period in African history.

India under Colonial Rule 1700 1885

Author: Douglas M. Peers
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317882857
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Between 1700 and 1885 the British became the paramount power on the Indian subcontinent, their authority extending from Sri Lankain the south to the Himalayasin the north. It was a massive empire, inspiring both pride and anxiety amongst the British, and forcing change upon and disrupting the lives of its Indian subjects. Yet it is not simply a history of conquest and subjugation, or dominance and defeat: interaction and interdependency powerfully shaped the histories of all involved. The end result was a hybrid empire. India may have become by 1885 the jewel in the British crown, but by that same year a series of changes had occurred within Indian society that would set the foundations for the modern states of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. This book provides a concise introduction to these dramatic changes.

Race Empire and First World War Writing

Author: Santanu Das
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 052150984X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Drawing upon fresh archival material this book recovers the experience of different ethnic groups during the First World War conflict.

New Geographies of Race and Racism

Author: Claire Dwyer
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 9780754670858
Format: PDF
Download Now
This edited collection focuses on research into youth, 'mixed race', identities, intersections of 'race' and ethnicity, and - crucially - has extended the focus from visible 'ethnic minorities' to the theorization and interrogation of whiteness. A key feature of the book is its engagement with a range of methodological approaches to examining the significance of race including ethnography, visual methodologies and historical analysis.

Forging Diaspora

Author: Frank Andre Guridy
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807895979
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Cuba's geographic proximity to the United States and its centrality to U.S. imperial designs following the War of 1898 led to the creation of a unique relationship between Afro-descended populations in the two countries. In Forging Diaspora, Frank Andre Guridy shows that the cross-national relationships nurtured by Afro-Cubans and black Americans helped to shape the political strategies of both groups as they attempted to overcome a shared history of oppression and enslavement. Drawing on archival sources in both countries, Guridy traces four encounters between Afro-Cubans and African Americans. These hidden histories of cultural interaction--of Cuban students attending Booker T. Washington's Tuskegee Institute, the rise of Garveyism, the Havana-Harlem cultural connection during the Harlem Renaissance and Afro-Cubanism movement, and the creation of black travel networks during the Good Neighbor and early Cold War eras--illustrate the significance of cross-national linkages to the ways both Afro-descended populations negotiated the entangled processes of U.S. imperialism and racial discrimination. As a result of these relationships, argues Guridy, Afro-descended peoples in Cuba and the United States came to identify themselves as part of a transcultural African diaspora.

The Origins of the Second World War

Author: Richard Overy
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317204697
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Exploring the reasons why the Second World War broke out in September 1939 and why a European conflict developed into a war that spanned the globe, The Origins of the Second World War argues that this was not just ‘Hitler’s War’ but one that had its roots and origins in the decline of the old empires of Britain and France and the rise of ambitious new powers in Germany, Italy and Japan who wanted large empires of their own. This fourth edition has been revised throughout, covering the origins of the war from its background in the First World War to its expansion to embrace the Soviet Union, Japan and the United States by the end of 1941. Creating a comprehensive and analytical narrative while remaining a succinct overview of the subject, this book takes a thematic approach to the complex range of events that culminated in global warfare, discussing factors such as economic rivalry, rearmament and domestic politics and emphasising that any explanation of the outbreak of hostilities must be global in scope. Containing updated references and primary source documents alongside a glossary, a chronology of key events and a Who’s Who of important figures, this book is an invaluable introduction for any student of this fascinating period.

Children of Uncertain Fortune

Author: Daniel Livesay
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469634449
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
By tracing the largely forgotten eighteenth-century migration of elite mixed-race individuals from Jamaica to Great Britain, Children of Uncertain Fortune reinterprets the evolution of British racial ideologies as a matter of negotiating family membership. Using wills, legal petitions, family correspondences, and inheritance lawsuits, Daniel Livesay is the first scholar to follow the hundreds of children born to white planters and Caribbean women of color who crossed the ocean for educational opportunities, professional apprenticeships, marriage prospects, or refuge from colonial prejudices. The presence of these elite children of color in Britain pushed popular opinion in the British Atlantic world toward narrower conceptions of race and kinship. Members of Parliament, colonial assemblymen, merchant kings, and cultural arbiters--the very people who decided Britain's colonial policies, debated abolition, passed marital laws, and arbitrated inheritance disputes--rubbed shoulders with these mixed-race Caribbean migrants in parlors and sitting rooms. Upper-class Britons also resented colonial transplants and coveted their inheritances; family intimacy gave way to racial exclusion. By the early nineteenth century, relatives had become strangers.

Gender Race and the Writing of Empire

Author: Paula M. Krebs
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521607728
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
All of London exploded on the night of May 18, 1900, in the biggest West End party ever seen. The mix of media manipulation, patriotism, and class, race, and gender politics that produced the 'spontaneous' festivities of Mafeking Night begins this analysis of the cultural politics of late-Victorian imperialism. Paula M. Krebs examines 'the last of the gentlemen's wars' - the Boer War of 1899–1902 - and the struggles to maintain an imperialist hegemony in a twentieth-century world, through the war writings of Arthur Conan Doyle, Olive Schreiner, H. Rider Haggard, and Rudyard Kipling, as well as contemporary journalism, propaganda, and other forms of public discourse. Her feminist analysis of such matters as the sexual honor of the British soldier at war, the deaths of thousands of women and children in 'concentration camps', and new concepts of race in South Africa marks this book as a significant contribution to British imperial studies.