Stamped from the Beginning

Author: Ibram X. Kendi
Publisher: Nation Books
ISBN: 1568584644
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A searing history of how racist ideas were created, disseminated, and entrenched in America Winner of the 2016 National Book Award for Nonfiction A New York Times Bestseller A Washington Post Bestseller Finalist for the 2016 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction Named one of the Best Books of the Year by the Boston Globe, Washington Post, Chicago Review of Books, The Root, Buzzfeed, Bustle, and Entropy "The most ambitious book of 2016."-The Washington Post Some Americans cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first black president spelled the doom of racism. But racist thought is not just alive and well in America--it is more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society. In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists. From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W.E.B. Du Bois to legendary anti-prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading pro-slavery and pro-civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America. Contrary to popular conceptions, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Instead, they were devised and honed by some of the most brilliant minds of each era. These intellectuals used their brilliance to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation's racial disparities in everything from wealth to health. And while racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited. In shedding much-needed light on the murky history of racist ideas, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose them--and in the process, gives us reason to hope.

Racism without Racists

Author: Eduardo Bonilla-Silva
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 144227624X
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Eduardo Bonilla-Silva’s acclaimed Racism without Racists is a provocative book that explodes the belief that America is now a color-blind society. The fifth edition includes a new chapter addressing what readers can do to confront racism, new material on the racial climate post-Obama, new coverage of the Black Lives Matter movement, and more.

Race and Racism

Author: R. Perry
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230609198
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This study examines the origins and development of racism in North America through addressing the inception and persistence of the concept of 'race' and the biology of human variance.

Racism in the United States Second Edition

Author: Joshua Miller, MSW, PhD
Publisher: Springer Publishing Company
ISBN: 0826148859
Format: PDF, ePub
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"This text fills an enormous gap in the field. The interactive style makes it accessible to both graduate and undergraduate students, providing thought-provoking insight into a complex topic. Of special note is the book's contemporary focus on social identity formation and intersectionality. Through exercises and examples, it encourages self-awareness and strategies to help students engage in dialogues about racism." —Donna Harris, LCSW, Bryn Mawr College "In this timely revision, Miller and Garran offer an insightful and comprehensive guide for critical practice. The book’s unambiguous attention to the impact of power and structural oppression on individuals, organizations, and communities is thoughtfully paired with accessible clinical case examples and applications."—Hye-Kyung Kang, Seattle University "Miller and Garran provide a clear, comprehensive, and accessible guide to understanding and addressing racism. It is filled with useful conceptual frameworks, exercises, and tools for helping professionals and others concerned about racial equity."—Diane J. Goodman, EdD, Diversity Consultant This comprehensive text thoroughly reviews the theories and history of racism, the sociology of and the psychology of racism, intergroup relations and intergroup conflict, and how racism is manifested institutionally, between groups, and between people, providing a unique view of the connections between these multiple perspectives. Readers can then apply this knowledge to their work as helping professionals. Students learn to explore their own biases and how they influence their view of themselves and others, which strengthens their work with future clients. Fulfilling NASW and CSWE cultural competency requirements, this book teaches socially just practices to helping professionals from any discipline. Many people want to dismantle racism but they do not know how. This book gets us closer to that goal. Using critical race theory as a conceptual framework, the text analyzes all levels of racism: personal, professional, institutional, and cultural. Integrating theory, research, and practice, racism is linked to other forms of oppression with an emphasis on how helping professionals can respond. Tips on how to facilitate racial dialogues are provided. Early chapters map out the contours of racism and later chapters emphasize how to dismantle it. Readers appreciate the book’s sensitive approach to this difficult topic. Examples and exercises encourage insight into understanding racism, and insightful analyses offer strategies, solutions, and hope. Readers learn to respond to racism in all contexts including working with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. New to the Second Edition: Reflects recent sociopolitical changes including "Islamophobia," the Obama presidency, the murders of young men of color by police, the racialization of the criminal justice system, and current immigration issues in its analysis of racism. More cases and experiential exercises help readers explore how racism is manifested and how to incorporate the lessons learned into future working environments. More emphasis on the intersectionality of racism and other social oppressions including class, gender, sexual orientation, citizenship, immigration experiences, and disability to give readers a better understanding of the relationship between these issues. PowerPoints and Instructor's Manual with sample syllabi, teaching tips, and suggested videos and related websites. An ideal text for advanced courses on racism, oppression, diversity, prejudice and discrimination, or racism and professional practice, this book also appeals to helping professionals (social workers, psychologists, counselors, and nurses) who need to understand racism to better serve their clients.

Clean and White

Author: Carl A. Zimring
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 147987437X
Format: PDF
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When Joe Biden attempted to compliment Barack Obama by calling him “clean and articulate,” he unwittingly tapped into one of the most destructive racial stereotypes in American history. This book tells the history of the corrosive idea that whites are clean and those who are not white are dirty. From the age of Thomas Jefferson to the Memphis Public Workers strike of 1968 through the present day, ideas about race and waste have shaped where people have lived, where people have worked, and how American society’s wastes have been managed. Clean and White offers a history of environmental racism in the United States focusing on constructions of race and hygiene. In the wake of the civil war, as the nation encountered emancipation, mass immigration, and the growth of an urbanized society, Americans began to conflate the ideas of race and waste. Certain immigrant groups took on waste management labor, such as Jews and scrap metal recycling, fostering connections between the socially marginalized and refuse. Ethnic “purity” was tied to pure cleanliness, and hygiene became a central aspect of white identity. Carl A. Zimring here draws on historical evidence from statesmen, scholars, sanitarians, novelists, activists, advertisements, and the United States Census of Population to reveal changing constructions of environmental racism. The material consequences of these attitudes endured and expanded through the twentieth century, shaping waste management systems and environmental inequalities that endure into the twenty-first century. Today, the bigoted idea that non-whites are “dirty” remains deeply ingrained in the national psyche, continuing to shape social and environmental inequalities in the age of Obama.

On Race and Racism in America

Author: Roy Martinez
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 9780271036397
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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On Race and Racism in America offers a variety of perspectives on American Philosophy's relative blindness to issues of race.

Everyday Racism

Author: Annie S. Barnes
Publisher: Sourcebooks, Inc.
ISBN: 9781570716539
Format: PDF
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Firsthand reports of the common forms of racism that black people experience in everyday life.

How Race Is Made in America

Author: Natalia Molina
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520280075
Format: PDF
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How Race Is Made in America examines Mexican Americans—from 1924, when American law drastically reduced immigration into the United States, to 1965, when many quotas were abolished—to understand how broad themes of race and citizenship are constructed. These years shaped the emergence of what Natalia Molina describes as an immigration regime, which defined the racial categories that continue to influence perceptions in the United States about Mexican Americans, race, and ethnicity. Molina demonstrates that despite the multiplicity of influences that help shape our concept of race, common themes prevail. Examining legal, political, social, and cultural sources related to immigration, she advances the theory that our understanding of race is socially constructed in relational ways—that is, in correspondence to other groups. Molina introduces and explains her central theory, racial scripts, which highlights the ways in which the lives of racialized groups are linked across time and space and thereby affect one another. How Race Is Made in America also shows that these racial scripts are easily adopted and adapted to apply to different racial groups.

The Biopolitics of Race

Author: Sokthan Yeng
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739182242
Format: PDF
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The Biopolitics of Race provides philosophical analysis of immigration, a pressing public issue, by focusing on how concerns over state health are used to identify and deny entrance to Mexican, Muslim, homosexual, and female immigrants.