Race on Trial

Author: Annette Gordon-Reed
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195122800
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This collection of 12 original essays brings together two themes of American culture - law and race. Cases discussed include Amistad, Dred Scott, Regents v. Bakke and O.J. Simpson.

Black Resistance White Law

Author: Mary Frances Berry
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101650850
Format: PDF, Docs
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How the government has used the Constitution to deny black Americans their legal rights From the arrival of the first twenty slaves in Jamestown to the Howard Beach Incident of 1986, Yusef Hawkins, and Rodney King, federal law enforcement has pleaded lack of authority against white violence while endorsing surveillance of black rebels and using “constitutional” military force against them. In this groundbreaking study, constitutional scholar Mary Frances Berry analyzes the reasons why millions of African Americans whose lives have improved enormously, both socially and economically, are still at risk of police abuse and largely unprotected from bias crimes. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case

Author: Michael Anthony Ross
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199778809
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Recounts a famous kidnapping that took place in New Orleans in 1870, in which a seventeen-month-old white child was taken by two African-American women, and the resulting public hysteria that led to racial tensions, political divisions, and false accusations and arrests.

Arc of Justice

Author: Kevin Boyle
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 9781429900164
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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An electrifying story of the sensational murder trial that divided a city and ignited the civil rights struggle In 1925, Detroit was a smoky swirl of jazz and speakeasies, assembly lines and fistfights. The advent of automobiles had brought workers from around the globe to compete for manufacturing jobs, and tensions often flared with the KKK in ascendance and violence rising. Ossian Sweet, a proud Negro doctor-grandson of a slave-had made the long climb from the ghetto to a home of his own in a previously all-white neighborhood. Yet just after his arrival, a mob gathered outside his house; suddenly, shots rang out: Sweet, or one of his defenders, had accidentally killed one of the whites threatening their lives and homes. And so it began-a chain of events that brought America's greatest attorney, Clarence Darrow, into the fray and transformed Sweet into a controversial symbol of equality. Historian Kevin Boyle weaves the police investigation and courtroom drama of Sweet's murder trial into an unforgettable tapestry of narrative history that documents the volatile America of the 1920s and movingly re-creates the Sweet family's journey from slavery through the Great Migration to the middle class. Ossian Sweet's story, so richly and poignantly captured here, is an epic tale of one man trapped by the battles of his era's changing times. Arc of Justice is the winner of the 2004 National Book Award for Nonfiction.

America History and Life

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
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Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.

Racism on Trial

Author: Ian F. Haney López
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674038264
Format: PDF
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In 1968, ten thousand students marched in protest over the terrible conditions prevalent in the high schools of East Los Angeles, the largest Mexican community in the United States. Chanting "Chicano Power," the young insurgents not only demanded change but heralded a new racial politics. Frustrated with the previous generation's efforts to win equal treatment by portraying themselves as racially white, the Chicano protesters demanded justice as proud members of a brown race. The legacy of this fundamental shift continues to this day. Ian Haney Lopez tells the compelling story of the Chicano movement in Los Angeles by following two criminal trials, including one arising from the student walkouts. He demonstrates how racial prejudice led to police brutality and judicial discrimination that in turn spurred Chicano militancy. He also shows that legal violence helped to convince Chicano activists that they were nonwhite, thereby encouraging their use of racial ideas to redefine their aspirations, culture, and selves. In a groundbreaking advance that further connects legal racism and racial politics, Haney Lopez describes how race functions as "common sense," a set of ideas that we take for granted in our daily lives. This racial common sense, Haney Lopez argues, largely explains why racism and racial affiliation persist today. By tracing the fluid position of Mexican Americans on the divide between white and nonwhite, describing the role of legal violence in producing racial identities, and detailing the commonsense nature of race, Haney Lopez offers a much needed, potentially liberating way to rethink race in the United States.

Civil Rights in American Law History and Politics

Author: Austin Sarat
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107039290
Format: PDF, Mobi
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"To pursue the concept of racial entitlement-even for the most admirable and benign of purposes-is to reinforce and preserve for future mischief the way of thinking that produced race slavery, race privilege and race hatred. In the eyes of government, we are just one race here. It is American." Justice Scalia "It never ceases to amaze me that the courts are so willing to assume that anything that is predominantly black must be inferior...Because of their distinctive histories and traditions, black schools can function as the center and symbol of black communities, and provide examples of independent black leadership, success, and achievement." Justice Thomas It is widely recognized that the idea of rights is central to America's national identity and its sense of itself.1 So powerful is our attachment to rights that some scholars see the American story as powerfully intertwined with what they label a "myth of rights."2 In this myth of rights perhaps nothing plays as important a role as the history of the mid-twentieth century struggle for civil rights for African-Americans. Brown v. Board of Education is, of course, the key moment in that struggle and it has become one of America's "sacred texts," a decision to which almost everyone pays homage even when they act in ways incompatible with its central premises.3 It is to the spirit of Brown that groups seeking recognition continuously appeal, a spirit that today plays a key role in the debate over gay marriage.4 Civil Rights in the American Story brings together the work of five distinguished scholars to critically assess the place of civil rights in the American story. This work includes examples of both the "old" and the "new" civil rights history. It uses the sources and analytics of both legal and social history"--

Law Never Here

Author: Frankie Y. Bailey
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275953034
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Shared racial and cultural experiences and the collective memory of those experiences play important roles in determining the responses of African Americans to issues of crime and violence. By examining American history through the prism of African American experience, this volume provides a framework for understanding contemporary issues regarding crime and justice, including the much-discussed gap between how blacks and whites perceive the fairness of the criminal justice system. Following a thesis offered by W.E.B. Du Bois with regard to African American responses to oppression, the authors argue that responses by African Americans to issues of crime and justice have taken three main forms--resistance, accommodation, and self-determination. These responses are related to efforts by African Americans to carve out social and psychological space for themselves and to find their place in America.

American Justice on Trial

Author: Lise Pearlman
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781587903694
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Pearlman's new book American Justice on Trial: People v. Newton compares the explosive state of American race relations in 1968 to race relations today with insights from key participants and observers of the Oakland, California death-penalty trial of Huey Newton for murder that launched the Black Panther Party and transformed the American jury.