Racial Attitudes and Asian Pacific Americans

Author: Karen Kurotsuchi Inkelas
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 0415979366
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This study examines the complex sources and implications of the racial attitudes of Asian Pacific American (APA) college students, who, as one of the fastest growing demographics in higher education enrollments, play an increasingly significant role in campus race relations.

The Model Minority Stereotype

Author: Nicholas Daniel Hartlep
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1623963605
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Researchers, higher education administrators, and high school and university students desire a sourcebook like The Model Minority Stereotype: Demystifying Asian American Success. This book will assist readers in locating research and literature on the model minority stereotype. This sourcebook is composed of an annotated bibliography on the stereotype that Asian Americans are successful. The most powerful resource for scholars to use and teachers to read must not simply duplicate what others (and previous literature) have written about, but must challenge it. Each chapter in The Model Minority Stereotype is thematic and challenges the model minority stereotype. Consisting of ten chapters, this book is the most comprehensive book written on the model minority myth to date.

Killing the Model Minority Stereotype

Author: Nicholas Daniel Hartlep
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1681231123
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Killing the Model Minority Stereotype comprehensively explores the complex permutations of the Asian model minority myth, exposing the ways in which stereotypes of Asian/Americans operate in the service of racism. Chapters include counternarratives, critical analyses, and transnational perspectives. This volume connects to overarching projects of decolonization, which social justice educators and practitioners will find useful for understanding how the model minority myth functions to uphold white supremacy and how complicity has a damaging impact in its perpetuation. The book adds a timely contribution to the model minority discourse. “The contributors to this book demonstrate that the insidious model minority stereotype is alive and well. At the same time, the chapters carefully and powerfully examine ways to deconstruct and speak back to these misconceptions of Asian Americans. Hartlep and Porfilio pull together an important volume for anyone interested in how racial and ethnic stereotypes play out in the lives of people of color across various contexts.” Vichet Chhuon, University of Minnesota Twin Cities “This volume presents valuable additions to the model minority literature exploring narratives challenging stereotypes in a wide range of settings and providing helpful considerations for research and practice.” David W. Chih, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign “Asian Pacific Islander adolescents and young adults are especially impacted by the model minority stereotype, and this volume details the reallife consequences for them and for all communities of color. The contributors provide a wideranging critique and deconstruction of the stereotype by uncovering many of its manifestations, and they also take the additional step of outlining clear strategies to undo the stereotype and prevent its deleterious effects on API youth. Killing the Model Minority Stereotype: Asian American Counterstories and Complicity is an essential read for human service professionals, educators, therapists, and all allies of communities of color.” Joseph R. Mills, LICSW, Asian Counseling and Referral Service, Seattle WA

Asian American History a Very Short Introduction

Author: Madeline Y. Hsu
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190219769
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A 2012 survey by the Pew Research Center reported that Asian Americans are the best-educated, highest-income, and best-assimilated racial group in the United States. Before reaching this level of economic success and social assimilation, however, Asian immigrants' path was full of difficult, even demeaning, moments. This book provides a sweeping and nuanced history of Asian Americans, revealing how and why the perception of Asian immigrants changed over time. Asian migrants, in large part Chinese, arrived in significant numbers on the West Coast during the 1850s and 1860s to work in gold mining and on the construction of the transcontinental Railroad. Unlike their contemporary European counterparts, Asians, often stigmatized as "coolies," challenged American ideals of equality with the problem of whether all racial groups could be integrated into America's democracy. The fear of the "Yellow Peril" soon spurred an array of legislative and institutional efforts to segregate them through immigration laws, restrictions on citizenship, and limits on employment, property ownership, access to public services, and civil rights. Prejudices against Asian Americans reached a peak during World War II, when Japanese Americans were interned en masse. It was only with changes in the immigration laws and the social and political activism of the 1960s and 1970s that Asian Americans gained ground and acceptance, albeit in the still stereotyped category of "model minorities." Madeline Y. Hsu weaves a fascinating historical narrative of this "American Dream." She shows how Asian American success, often attributed to innate cultural values, is more a result of the immigration laws, which have largely pre-selected immigrants of high economic and social potential. Asian Americans have, in turn, been used by politicians to bludgeon newer (and more populous) immigrant groups for their purported lack of achievement. Hsu deftly reveals how public policy, which can restrict and also selectively promote certain immigrant populations, is a key reason why some immigrant groups appear to be more naturally successful and why the identity of those groups evolves differently from others.

Teaching Strategies for Ethnic Studies

Author: James A. Banks
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon
ISBN: 9780205594276
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Written by the leading authority in the field, the Eighth Edition of this classic text has been rewritten and updated to reflect current and emerging theory, research, and scholarship in the fields of ethnic studies and multicultural education. Divided into five parts, Teaching Strategies for Ethnic Studies emphasizes that the main goal of the multicultural curriculum should be to help students develop the ability to make reflective decisions so that they can, through thoughtful action, influence their personal, social, and civic worlds and help make them more democratic and just.

Two Faces of Exclusion

Author: Lon Kurashige
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469629445
Format: PDF, Kindle
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From the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 to the Immigration Act of 1924 to Japanese American internment during World War II, the United States has a long history of anti-Asian policies. But Lon Kurashige demonstrates that despite widespread racism, Asian exclusion was not the product of an ongoing national consensus; it was a subject of fierce debate. This book complicates the exclusion story by examining the organized and well-funded opposition to discrimination that involved some of the most powerful public figures in American politics, business, religion, and academia. In recovering this opposition, Kurashige explains the rise and fall of exclusionist policies through an unstable and protracted political rivalry that began in the 1850s with the coming of Asian immigrants, extended to the age of exclusion from the 1880s until the 1960s, and since then has shaped the memory of past discrimination. In this first book-length analysis of both sides of the debate, Kurashige argues that exclusion-era policies were more than just enactments of racism; they were also catalysts for U.S.-Asian cooperation and the basis for the twenty-first century's tightly integrated Pacific world.

Model Minority Myth Revisited

Author: Guofang Li
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1607529130
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This is the first in the book series on educational research sponsored by Chinese American Educational Research and Development Association (CAERDA, www.caerda.org).

Global Spaces of Chinese Culture

Author: Sylvia Van Ziegert
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9780415978903
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This book is an exploration of how Chinese communites in the United States and Germany create and disseminate a sense of diasporic Chinese identity. It not only compares the local conditions of the Chinese communities in the two locations, but also moves to a global dimension to track the Chinese transnational imaginary. Van Ziegert analyzes three strategies that overseas Chinese use to articulate their identities as diasporic subjects: being more American/German being more Chinese hybridizing and commodifying Chinese culture through trans-cultural performances. These three strategies are not mutually exclusive and they often intersect and supplement each other in unexpected ways. The author also analyzes how the everyday lives of overseas Chinese connect with global and local factors, and how these experiences contribute to the formation of a global Chinese identity.

Unhooking from Whiteness

Author: Cleveland Hayes
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9462093776
Format: PDF
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The purpose of Unhooking from Whiteness: The Key to Dismantling Racism in the United States is to reconsider the ways and strategies in which antiracist scholars do their work, as well as to provide pragmatic ways in which people – White and of color – can build cross-racial, cross-communal, and cross-institutional coalitions to fight White supremacy. Employing the methodology of autoethnography, each chapter in this book illustrates the individual journey that the chapter contributor took to “unhook” him or herself from Whiteness. Unhooking from Whiteness explains Whiteness in ways never conceptualized before. The chapters suggest approaches to “unhooking” from Whiteness, while sharing the authors’ continual struggles to identify and eradicate the role of Whiteness in education and society in the United States. The contributors to Unhooking from Whiteness offer us the invaluable gift of their stories, humble reflections on commitments to racial justice and complicities with racial injustice. But they aren’t merely stories – and this is the brilliance of the book – they are invitations into a reconsideration of the “common sense” discussions about the nature of white privilege, the possibility of white anti-racism, and the pervasive tug of whiteness. This is the rare book that shifts the angle and changes the conversation. Paul Gorski, Coordinator of the Social Justice Concentration, George Mason University