Racism and the Law

Author: Gerald Postema
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401589771
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Plessy v Ferguson (1897) established racial segregation in American constitutional law for over fifty years and its moral and political legacy lives on, despite attempts in the United States to counter its devastating effects during the last half century. Ironically, in the current debate over affirmative action, Justice Harlan's eloquent dissent has been used to justify attacks on government affirmative action programs. In this book, five distinguished philosophers and constitutional theorists, working from very different theoretical positions, take a fresh critical look at the moral and political principles underlying this historic decision and Harlan's dissent. They also explore the nature and extent of law's complicity in perpetuating Plessy's racialist aims. Emerging from their varied but complementary analyses is a deeper and more nuanced understanding of the social injustice of racial segregation in its historic and contemporary forms and of resources of the law to reverse it.

Plessy V Ferguson

Author: Williamjames Hoffer
Publisher: Landmark Law Cases & American
ISBN: 9780700618460
Format: PDF, ePub
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A concise readable summary and guide to Plessy v. Fergusson (1896), one of the Supreme Court's most famous and controversial decisions--one that offered legal cover for the practice of segregation for nearly six decades.

The Judicial Branch Evaluating and Interpreting Laws

Author: Brian Duignan
Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc
ISBN: 1538301679
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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While the Supreme Court is certainly a beacon of the judiciary system, it is not the only element in this branch of the U.S. government. In this text, the reader is immersed into the judicial branch at all levels, including state and circuit courts, courts of appeals, and their individual functions. By honing in on some of the pivotal cases tried by the judicial branch in the United States, such as Brown v. Board of Education and Roe v. Wade, this book establishes the worth and importance of judges, juries, and lawyers to our nation's past and present.

Slavery by Another Name

Author: Douglas A. Blackmon
Publisher: Icon Books
ISBN: 1848314132
Format: PDF, Docs
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A Pulitzer Prize-winning history of the mistreatment of black Americans. In this 'precise and eloquent work' - as described in its Pulitzer Prize citation - Douglas A. Blackmon brings to light one of the most shameful chapters in American history - an 'Age of Neoslavery' that thrived in the aftermath of the Civil War through the dawn of World War II. Using a vast record of original documents and personal narratives, Blackmon unearths the lost stories of slaves and their descendants who journeyed into freedom after the Emancipation Proclamation and then back into the shadow of involuntary servitude thereafter. By turns moving, sobering and shocking, this unprecedented account reveals these stories, the companies that profited the most from neoslavery, and the insidious legacy of racism that reverberates today.

Encyclopedia of U S Political History

Author: Andrew Robertson
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 1604266473
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Encyclopedia of U.S. Political History explores the events, policies, activities, institutions, groups, people, and movements that have created and shaped political life in the United States. With contributions from scholars in the fields of history and political science, this seven-volume set provides students, researchers, and scholars the opportunity to examine the political evolution of the United States from the 1500s to the present day. With greater coverage than any other resource, the Encyclopedia of U.S. Political History identifies and illuminates patterns and interrelations that will expand the reader’s understanding of American political institutions, culture, behavior, and change. Focusing on both government and history, the Encyclopedia brings exceptional breadth and depth to the topic with more than 100 essays for each of the critical time periods covered.

Brown v Board of Education

Author: James T. Patterson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199880840
Format: PDF, Kindle
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2004 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Supreme Court's unanimous decision to end segregation in public schools. Many people were elated when Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren delivered Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka in May 1954, the ruling that struck down state-sponsored racial segregation in America's public schools. Thurgood Marshall, chief attorney for the black families that launched the litigation, exclaimed later, "I was so happy, I was numb." The novelist Ralph Ellison wrote, "another battle of the Civil War has been won. The rest is up to us and I'm very glad. What a wonderful world of possibilities are unfolded for the children!" Here, in a concise, moving narrative, Bancroft Prize-winning historian James T. Patterson takes readers through the dramatic case and its fifty-year aftermath. A wide range of characters animates the story, from the little-known African Americans who dared to challenge Jim Crow with lawsuits (at great personal cost); to Thurgood Marshall, who later became a Justice himself; to Earl Warren, who shepherded a fractured Court to a unanimous decision. Others include segregationist politicians like Governor Orval Faubus of Arkansas; Presidents Eisenhower, Johnson, and Nixon; and controversial Supreme Court justices such as William Rehnquist and Clarence Thomas. Most Americans still see Brown as a triumph--but was it? Patterson shrewdly explores the provocative questions that still swirl around the case. Could the Court--or President Eisenhower--have done more to ensure compliance with Brown? Did the decision touch off the modern civil rights movement? How useful are court-ordered busing and affirmative action against racial segregation? To what extent has racial mixing affected the academic achievement of black children? Where indeed do we go from here to realize the expectations of Marshall, Ellison, and others in 1954?