Railroads of Omaha and Council Bluffs

Author: William Kratville
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738520421
Format: PDF, Docs
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Well into the 20th century, the railroad industry implemented a series of great technological changes that revolutionized rail transit in America. The twin cities of Omaha and Council Bluffs, serving as Union Pacific headquarters and the nation's nucleus of continental train travel, witnessed the bulk of these changes. Through a collection of captivating photographs, Railroads of Omaha and Council Bluffs documents the transformations that took place in the railroad industry and the impact those changes made on these two cities, as well as the rest of the country. The creation of the "streamlined" passenger train, the transition from steam to diesel power, the golden years of Omaha's Union Station, and the revolution of railroad freight service through mergers and government deregulation are just some of the events explored in this fascinating book.

Upstream Metropolis

Author: Lawrence Harold Larsen
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 080320602X
Format: PDF
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"Being a man, like being a woman, is something you have to learn," Aaron Raz Link remarks. Few would know this better than the coauthor of What Becomes You , who began life as a girl named Sarah and twenty-nine years later began life anew as a gay man.

The First Transcontinental Railroad

Author: James K. Wheaton
Publisher: BookCaps Study Guides
ISBN: 1610427610
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The First Transcontinental Railroad, originally called the Pacific Railroad, was a railroad built in the United States between 1863 and 1869 that connected the western part of America with its eastern part. Built by the Central Pacific Railroad of California and the Union Pacific Railroad, it connected the Eastern terminus of Council Bluffs, Iowa/Omaha, Nebraska with the railroad lines of the Pacific Ocean at Oakland, California. In time, it would link in with the existing railway network present on the Eastern Coast of America, thus connecting the Atlantic and Pacific coast of the United States for the first time by rail. Because of this, the line received a second nickname, “the Overland Route.” The railroad was a government operation, authorized by Congress during the height of the Civil War. Congress passed the Pacific Railroad Acts in 1862 and again in 1864. To pay for it, the US government issued 30 year bonds, as well as granting government land to contractors. The construction of the line was a major achievement by both the Union Pacific (constructing westward from Iowa) and the Central Pacific (constructing eastward from California). The line was officially opened on May 10, 1869, with the Last Spike driven through the railway at Promontory Summit, Utah. James K. Wheaton looks at the history in this eBook.

The Burlington Railroad

Author: Richard C. Kistler
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439648948
Format: PDF, ePub
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Alliance has been a railroad center ever since the Burlington Railroad established the city in 1888 while pushing tracks into the vast, open regions of Nebraska, South Dakota, Wyoming, Colorado, and Montana. As a hub for trains carrying a variety of agricultural and mining products to market, Alliance became headquarters in 1902 for the large and geographically diverse area of Burlington train operations called the Alliance Division. For 86 years, the Alliance Division controlled much of the region’s rail traffic. Despite the loss of its division point status in 1988, Alliance continues to have its fortunes closely tied to the railroad, now known as the Burlington Northern & Santa Fe. Today, the BNSF funnels large numbers of coal trains through the city while transporting Power River Basin coal to power plants across the nation.

Rival Rails

Author: Walter R. Borneman
Publisher: Random House Incorporated
ISBN: 1400065615
Format: PDF
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From wagon ruts to railroad empire, the author of Polk writes an expansive account of the battle to control the heavily contested transportation corridors of the American Southwest and to build America's greatest transcontinental route, in a book that includes archival photos and 30 maps.