The Writer s Reference Guide to Spanish

Author: David William Foster
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292789173
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Writers and editors of Spanish have long needed an authoritative guide to written language usage, similar to The MLA Style Manual and The Chicago Manual of Style. And here it is! This reference guide provides comprehensive information on how the Spanish language is copyedited for publication. The book covers these major areas: Language basics: capitalization, word division, spelling, and punctuation. Language conventions: abbreviations, professional and personal titles, names of organizations, and nationalities. Bibliographic format, particularly how Spanish differs from English. Spanish language forms of classical authors' names. Literary and grammatical terminology. Linguistic terminology. Biblical names and allusions. A dictionary of grammatical doubts, including usage, grammatical constructions of particular words and phrases, verbal irregularities, and gender variations.

Encyclopedia of Literary Translation Into English A L

Author: O. Classe
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9781884964367
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This anthology examines Love's Labours Lost from a variety of perspectives and through a wide range of materials. Selections discuss the play in terms of historical context, dating, and sources; character analysis; comic elements and verbal conceits; evidence of authorship; performance analysis; and feminist interpretations. Alongside theater reviews, production photographs, and critical commentary, the volume also includes essays written by practicing theater artists who have worked on the play. An index by name, literary work, and concept rounds out this valuable resource.

Modernismo Modernity and the Development of Spanish American Literature

Author: Cathy L. Jrade
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292740457
Format: PDF, Docs
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Modernismo arose in Spanish American literature as a confrontation with and a response to modernizing forces that were transforming Spanish American society in the later nineteenth century. In this book, Cathy L. Jrade undertakes a full exploration of the modernista project and shows how it provided a foundation for trends and movements that have continued to shape literary production in Spanish America throughout the twentieth century. Jrade opens with a systematic consideration of the development of modernismo and then proceeds with detailed analyses of works-poetry, narrative, and essays-that typified and altered the movement's course. In this way, she situates the writing of key authors, such as Rubén Darío, José Martí, and Leopoldo Lugones, within the overall modernista project and traces modernismo's influence on subsequent generations of writers. Jrade's analysis reclaims the power of the visionary stance taken by these creative intellectuals. She firmly abolishes any lingering tendency to associate modernismo with affectation and effete elegance, revealing instead how the modernistas' new literary language expressed their profound political and epistemological concerns.

Reclaiming the Author

Author: Lucille Kerr
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822312246
Format: PDF, Docs
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The recent fiction of Spanish America has been widely acclaimed for its experimental and revolutionary qualities. In Reclaiming the Author, Lucille Kerr studies the sources of power of this newly emergent literature in her detailed examination of the critical concept of "the author." Kerr considers how Spanish American narratives raise questions about authorial identity and activity through the different figures of the author they propose. These author-figures, she maintains, both complement and contradict notions of authority that exist outside of the world of fiction. By focusing on works by well-known Spanish American authors—Cortazar, Donoso, Fuentes, Poniatowska, Puig, and Vargas Llosa—Kerr shows how the Spanish Americans have formed a radical poetics of the author. Her readings demonstrate how exemplary Spanish American texts, such as Rayuela, Terra nostra, and El hablador, call into question the author as a unitary or uniform, and therefore unproblematical, figure. Individually and together, Kerr's readings reclaim "the author" as a complex critical concept encompassing diverse, conflicting, even competitive roles. Scholars in contemporary literature and theory, in particular those involved with Spanish American literature, will find Reclaiming the Author an original and compelling book.

A Common Place

Author: Julie Jones
Publisher: Bucknell University Press
ISBN: 9780838753781
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The issues raised in this study are pertinent to contemporary fiction in general: important here are theories of representation, of place, of metafiction and parody, and questions involving postcolonial, urban, travel, and postmodern literature.

Twentieth Century Spanish American Fiction

Author: Naomi Lindstrom
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292746822
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Spanish American fiction became a world phenomenon in the twentieth century through multilanguage translations of such novels as Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude, Manuel Puig's Kiss of the Spider Woman, Octavio Paz's Labyrinth of Solitude, and Isabel Allende's House of the Spirits. Yet these "blockbusters" are only a tiny fraction of the total, rich outpouring of Spanish-language literature from Latin America. In this book, Naomi Lindstrom offers English-language readers a comprehensive survey of the century's literary production in Latin America (excluding Brazil). Discussing movements and trends, she places the famous masterworks in historical perspective and highlights authors and works that deserve a wider readership. Her study begins with Rodó's famous essay Ariel and ends with Rigoberta Menchú's 1992 achievement of the Nobel Prize. Her selection of works is designed to draw attention, whenever possible, to works that are available in good English translations. A special feature of the book is its treatment of the "postboom" period. In this important concluding section, Lindstrom discusses documentary narratives, the new interrelations between popular culture and literary writing, and underrepresented groups such as youth cultures, slum dwellers, gays and lesbians, and ethnic enclaves. Written in accessible, nonspecialized language, Twentieth-Century Spanish American Fiction will be equally useful for general readers as a broad overview of this vibrant literature and for scholars as a reliable reference work.

A Companion to Modern Spanish American Fiction

Author: Donald Leslie Shaw
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd
ISBN: 1855660784
Format: PDF, ePub
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Drawing upon recent research, Shaw traces the pattern from Romanticism to the Boom and beyond and shows how presumptions about narrative and reality have undergone radical alterations.

The Emergence of the Latin American Novel

Author: Gordon Brotherston
Publisher: CUP Archive
ISBN: 9780521295659
Format: PDF, ePub
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Dr Brotherston surveys the modern novel of Spanish-speaking America. He starts with an introduction on 'settings and people', going on to consider individual modern novels.

The Columbia Guide to the Latin American Novel Since 1945

Author: Raymond L. Williams
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231501692
Format: PDF, ePub
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In this expertly crafted, richly detailed guide, Raymond Leslie Williams explores the cultural, political, and historical events that have shaped the Latin American and Caribbean novel since the end of World War II. In addition to works originally composed in English, Williams covers novels written in Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch, and Haitian Creole, and traces the profound influence of modernization, revolution, and democratization on the writing of this era. Beginning in 1945, Williams introduces major trends by region, including the Caribbean and U.S. Latino novel, the Mexican and Central American novel, the Andean novel, the Southern Cone novel, and the novel of Brazil. He discusses the rise of the modernist novel in the 1940s, led by Jorge Luis Borges's reaffirmation of the right of invention, and covers the advent of the postmodern generation of the 1990s in Brazil, the Generation of the "Crack" in Mexico, and the McOndo generation in other parts of Latin America. An alphabetical guide offers biographies of authors, coverage of major topics, and brief introductions to individual novels. It also addresses such areas as women's writing, Afro-Latin American writing, and magic realism. The guide's final section includes an annotated bibliography of introductory studies on the Latin American and Caribbean novel, national literary traditions, and the work of individual authors. From early attempts to synthesize postcolonial concerns with modernist aesthetics to the current focus on urban violence and globalization, The Columbia Guide to the Latin American Novel Since 1945 presents a comprehensive, accessible portrait of a thoroughly diverse and complex branch of world literature.