Reclaiming Reading

Author: Richard J. Meyer
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136837914
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
This book examines how the teaching of reading can be reclaimed from government mandates, scripted commercial programs, and high stakes tests via intensive reconsideration of learning, teaching, curriculum, language, and sociocultural contexts.

Literacy Policies and Practices in Conflict

Author: Nancy Rankie Shelton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113631217X
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
Current U.S. school reform efforts link school success, student achievement, and teacher performance to standardized tests and narrowly prescribed curricula. How do test-driven, mandated curricula in urban school systems overtly and subtly impact teachers’ efforts to provide technologically advanced, challenging classroom environments that foster literacy development for all students? How do these federal policies affect instruction at the classroom level? The premise of this book is that, in order for teachers to confront and/or counteract the pressures placed on them from these policies, it is necessary to first understand them. This book takes a close look at the tensions that exist between federal mandates and contemporary literacy needs and how those tensions impact classroom practices. Providing a clear sociopolitical overview and analysis, it combines theoretical explanations with examples from current ethnographic research. Readers are challenged to (re)consider whether meeting test performance benchmarks should be the hallmark of school success when the goal of test performance supersedes the goal of producing highly literate, productive citizens of the future.

From the Brain to the Classroom The Encyclopedia of Learning

Author: Sheryl Feinstein
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1610695402
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Supplying a foundation for understanding the development of the brain and the learning process, this text examines the physical and environmental factors that influence how we acquire and retain information throughout our lives. The book also lays out practical strategies that educators can take directly into the classroom. • Covers a wide range of topics written by educationists, psychologists, and neuroscientists who are all experts in their field • Provides meaningful instructional strategies that can be applied in the real world to improve educators' results • Examines the brain through the human lifespan—prenatal, early childhood, childhood, adolescence, adult, and old age—in order to supply a comprehensive look at how neuroscience can be applied to improve learning at all stages of maturity • Addresses cognitive neuroscience findings as they relate to special education students—invaluable information for educators who work with this important group of learners

Reclaiming Early Childhood Literacies

Author: Richard J Meyer
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317371739
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
At a time when literacy has become more of a political issue than a research or pedagogical one, this volume refocuses attention on work with young children that places them at the center of their literacy worlds. Drawing on robust and growing knowledge which is often marginalized because of political and legislative forces, it explores young children’s literacies as inclusive, redefined, and broadened—encompassing technologies, the arts, multiple modalities, and teaching and learning for democracy, cultural sustainability and social justice. Highlighted themes include children’s rights to grow through playful engagements with multiple literacies to interrogate their worlds; adults who expand and inspire children’s consciousness and awareness of others and the world around them; the centrality of meaning making in all aspects of language and literacy development; a deep respect for diversities, including languages, cultures, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status and more; and an expansive understanding of the nature of texts.

Teacher Action Research

Author: Gerald J. Pine
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1452278741
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
"This is a wonderful book with deep insight into the relationship between teachers' action and result of student learning. It discusses from different angles impact of action research on student learning in the classroom. Writing samples provided at the back are wonderful examples." —Kejing Liu, Shawnee State University Teacher Action Research: Building Knowledge Democracies focuses on helping schools build knowledge democracies through a process of action research in which teachers, students, and parents collaborate in conducting participatory and caring inquiry in the classroom, school, and community. Author Gerald J. Pine examines historical origins, the rationale for practice-based research, related theoretical and philosophical perspectives, and action research as a paradigm rather than a method. Key Features Discusses how to build a school research culture through collaborative teacher research Delineates the role of the professional development school as a venue for constructing a knowledge democracy Focuses on how teacher action research can empower the active and ongoing inclusion of nontraditional voices (those of students and parents) in the research process Includes chapters addressing the concrete practices of observation, reflection, dialogue, writing, and the conduct of action research, as well as examples of teacher action research studies

On Reading

Author: Kenneth S. Goodman
Publisher: Heinemann Educational Books
ISBN: 9780435072001
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Goodman makes the highly complex process of reading easy to understand. He involves his readers in examining their own reading, and he provides real language examples from real children reading real texts.

Exploring Diversity through Multimodality Narrative and Dialogue

Author: Mary B. McVee
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317458486
Format: PDF
Download Now
Exploring Diversity through Multimodality, Narrative, and Dialogue awakens educators to the ways in which values, beliefs, language use, culture, identity, social class, race, and other factors filter approaches to teaching and expectations for students. Designed as a guide to help educators engage in dialogic interactions, the text articulates a theoretically grounded and research-based framework related to the use of personal narratives as learning tools. Educators are encouraged to consider their own positions, explore topics of diversity and social justice, and identify ways to better address student needs. Drawing on theories from multiliteracies, multimodality, embodiment, and narrative, chapters are framed around book discussions and the use of personal narrative to define and provide examples of dialogic interactions. Unique to this book is its focus on embodied learning and multimodality as well as myriad artifacts produced by educators; listening, not just dialogic talk; writing (both traditional print texts and multimodal composition) that supports dialogic interaction; and not merely responding to literature but developing empathic responses to texts, students, and others whose opinions may differ from one’s own viewpoints. The specific techniques and approaches presented can be used within educational and professional development settings to help readers enhance their journey toward greater awareness of others and of their own beliefs and experiences that lead toward social justice for all.

Salt

Author: Helen Frost
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)
ISBN: 1250127076
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Anikwa and James, twelve years old in 1812, spend their days fishing, trapping, and exploring together in the forests of the Indiana Territory. To Anikwa and his family, members of the Miami tribe, this land has been home for centuries. As traders, James's family has ties to the Miami community as well as to the American soldiers in the fort. Now tensions are rising—the British and American armies prepare to meet at Fort Wayne for a crucial battle, and Native Americans from surrounding tribes gather in Kekionga to protect their homeland. After trading stops and precious commodities, like salt, are withheld, the fort comes under siege, and war ravages the land. James and Anikwa, like everyone around them, must decide where their deepest loyalties lie. Can their families—and their friendship—survive? In Salt, Printz Honor author Helen Frost offers a compelling look at a difficult time in history. A Kirkus Reviews Best Book of 2013 A Frances Foster Book

Reclaiming Conversation

Author: Sherry Turkle
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143109790
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Preeminent author and researcher Sherry Turkle has been studying digital culture for over thirty years. Long an enthusiast for its possibilities, here she investigates a troubling consequence: that we have stopped having face-to-face conversation in favour of technological connections such as texts or emails. Based on five years of research and interviews in homes, schools and the workplace, Turkle argues here that we now have a better understanding of this phenomenon, and that going forward, it's time we reclaim conversation, the most human thing that we do.

Call Me Maria

Author: Judith Ortiz Cofer
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780756969455
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Fifteen-year-old Maria leaves her mother and their Puerto Rican home to live in the barrio of New York with her father, and feels torn between the two cultures in which she has been raised.