Religion and the Creation of Race and Ethnicity

Author: Craig R. Prentiss
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814767009
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This volume, meant specifically for those new to the field, brings together an ensemble of prominent scholars and illuminates the role religious myths have played in shaping those social boundaries that we call "races" and "ethnicities".

An Introduction to the Sociology of Religion

Author: Inger Furseth
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351958666
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Is it true that religion is weakening in modern times, or are we facing religious resurgence? What is fundamentalism? How does it emerge and grow? What role does religion play in ethnic and national conflicts? Is religion a fundamental driving force or do political leaders use religion for their own purposes? Do all religions oppress women? These are some of the questions addressed in this book. An Introduction to the Sociology of Religion provides an overview of sociological theories of contemporary religious life. Some chapters are organized according to topic. Others offer brief presentations of classical and contemporary sociologists from Karl Marx to Zygmunt Bauman and their perspectives on social life, including religion. Throughout the book, illustrations and examples are taken from several religious traditions.

Deeper Shades of Purple

Author: Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814727530
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The second wave of feminism was one of the most significant political and cultural developments of the 1960s and 1970s. Yet the role radical feminism played within the women's movement remains hotly contested. For some, radical feminism has made a lasting contribution to our understanding of male privilege, and the ways the power imbalance between men and women affects the everyday fabric of women's lives. For others, radical feminism represents a reflexive hostility toward men, sex, and heterosexuality, and thus is best ignored or forgotten. Rather than have the movement be interpreted by others, Radical Feminism permits the original work of radical feminists to speak for itself. Comprised of pivotal documents written by U.S. radical feminists in the 1960s and 1970s, Radical Feminism combines both unpublished and previously published manifestos, position papers, minutes of meetings, and newsletters essential to an understanding of radical feminism. Consisting of documents unavailable to the general public, and others in danger of being lost altogether, this panoramic collection is organized around the key issues of sex and sexuality, race, children, lesbianism, separatism, and class. Barbara A. Crow rescues the groundbreaking original work of such groups as The Furies, Redstockings, Cell 16, and the Women's Liberation Movement. Contributors include Kate Millet, Susan Brownmiller, Shulamith Firestone, Rosalyn Baxandall, Toni Morrison, Ellen Willis, Anne Koett, and Vivan Gornick. Gathered for the first time in one volume, these primary sources of radical feminism fill a major gap in the literature on feminism and feminist thought. Radical Feminism is an indispensable resource for future generations of feminists, scholars, and activists. "This valuable anthology may well change the way many of us view radical feminism." --Resources for Feminist Research, Winter/Spring 2001, Vol. 28, No. 3/4

God in Chinatown

Author: Kenneth J. Guest
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814731536
Format: PDF, Docs
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Since the passage of Roe v. Wade, the debate over reproductive rights has dominated America’s courts, legislatures, and streets. The contributors to The Reproductive Rights Reader embrace reproductive justice for all women, but challenge mainstream legal and political solutions based on protecting free choice via neutral governmental policies, which frequently ignore or jeopardize the interests of women of color and the poor. Instead, the pieces in this interdisciplinary book—including both legal cases and articles by legal scholars, historians, sociologists, political scientists and others—favor a critical analysis that addresses the concrete material conditions that limit choices, the role of law and social policy in creating those conditions, and the gendered power dynamics that inform and are reinforced by the regulation of human reproduction. The selections demonstrate that the right to choice is not an automatic guarantee of reproductive justice and gender equality; to truly achieve this ideal it is essential to recognize the complexity of women’s reproductive experiences and needs. Divided into four sections, the book examines feminist critiques of medical knowledge and practice; and the legal regulation of pregnancy termination, conception and child-bearing, and behavior during pregnancy.

Damned Nation

Author: Kathryn Gin Lum
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199375186
Format: PDF
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Among the pressing concerns of Americans in the first century of nationhood were day-to-day survival, political harmony, exploration of the continent, foreign policy, and--fixed deeply in the collective consciousness--hell and eternal damnation. The fear of fire and brimstone and the worm that never dies exerted a profound and lasting influence on Americans' ideas about themselves, their neighbors, and the rest of the world. Kathryn Gin Lum poses a number of vital questions: Why did the fear of hell survive Enlightenment critiques in America, after largely subsiding in Europe and elsewhere? What were the consequences for early and antebellum Americans of living with the fear of seeing themselves and many people they knew eternally damned? How did they live under the weighty obligation to save as many souls as possible? What about those who rejected this sense of obligation and fear? Gin Lum shows that beneath early Americans' vaunted millennial optimism lurked a pervasive anxiety: that rather than being favored by God, they and their nation might be the object of divine wrath. As time-honored social hierarchies crumbled before revival fire, economic unease, and political chaos, "saved" and "damned" became as crucial distinctions as race, class, and gender. The threat of damnation became an impetus for or deterrent from all kinds of behaviors, from reading novels to owning slaves. Gin Lum tracks the idea of hell from the Revolution to Reconstruction. She considers the ideas of theological leaders like Jonathan Edwards and Charles Finney, as well as those of ordinary women and men. She discusses the views of Native Americans, Americans of European and African descent, residents of Northern insane asylums and Southern plantations, New England's clergy and missionaries overseas, and even proponents of Swedenborgianism and annihilationism. Damned Nation offers a captivating account of an idea that played a transformative role in America's intellectual and cultural history.

The SAGE Handbook of Race and Ethnic Studies

Author: Patricia Hill Collins
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1446248356
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"The SAGE Handbook of Race and Ethnic Studies is one of the best handbooks outlining the latest thinking on race and ethnic studies published in recent years...The breadth of themes and the depth of discussion are ambitious, offering the reader an A-Z guide of contemporary thinking on race and ethnicity...a valuable resource for scholars and activists alike." - Runnymede Bulletin What is the state of race and ethnic studies today? How has the field emerged? What are the core concepts, debates and issues? This panoramic, critical survey of the field supplies researchers and students with a vital resource. It is a rigorous, focused examination of the central questions in the field today. The text examines: The roots of the field of race and ethnic studies. The distinction between race and ethnicity. Methodological issues facing researchers. Intersections between race and ethnicity and questions of sexuality, gender, nation and social transformation. The challenge of multiculturalism. Race, ethnicity and globalization. Race and the family. Race and education. Race and religion. Planned and edited by a distinguished team of Anglo-American scholars, the Handbook pools an impressive range of international world class expertise and insight. It provides a landmark work in the field which will be the measure of debate and research for years to come.

Gender Race and Religion in the Colonization of the Americas

Author: Nora E. Jaffary
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 9780754651895
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The essays in this collection provide a coherent perspective on the comparative history of European colonialism in the Americas through their treatment of four central themes: the gendered implications of life on colonial frontiers; non-European women's relationships to Christian institutions; the implications of race-mixing; and social networks established by women of various ethnicities in the colonial context. Geographic regions covered include the Caribbean, Brazil, English America, and New France.

Ethnicity Race Religion

Author: Katherine M. Hockey
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 0567677311
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Religion, ethnicity and race are facets of human identity that have become increasingly contested in the study of the Bible - largely due to the modern discipline of biblical studies having developed in the context of Western Europe, concurrent with the emergence of various racial and imperial ideologies. The essays in this volume address Western domination by focusing on historical facets of ethnicity and race in antiquity, the identities of Jews and Christians, and the critique of scholarly ideologies and racial assumptions which have shaped this branch of study. The contributors critique various Western European and North American contexts, and bring fresh perspectives from other global contexts, providing insights into how biblical studies can escape its enmeshment in often racist notions of ethnicity, race, empire, nationhood and religion. Covering issues ranging from translation and racial stereotyping to analysing the significance of race in Genesis and the problems of an imperialist perspective, this volume is vital not only for biblical scholars but those invested in Christian, Jewish and Muslim identity.

Encyclopedia of Race Ethnicity and Society

Author: Richard T. Schaefer
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1412926947
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This three volume reference set offers a comprehensive look at the roles race and ethnicity play in society and in our daily lives. General readers, students, and scholars alike will appreciate the informative coverage of intergroup relations in the United States and the comparative examination of race and ethnicity worldwide. These volumes offer a foundation to understanding as well as researching racial and ethnic diversity from a multidisciplinary perspective. Over a hundred racial and ethnic groups are described, with additional thematic essays offering insight into broad topics that cut across group boundaries and which impact on society. The encyclopedia has alphabetically arranged author-signed essays with references to guide further reading. Numerous cross-references aid the reader to explore beyond specific entries, reflecting the interdependent nature of race and ethnicity operating in society. The text is supplemented by photographs, tables, figures and custom-designed maps to provide an engaging visual look at race and ethnicity. An easy-to-use statistical appendix offers the latest data with carefully selected historical comparisons to aid study and research in the area

Creole Religions of the Caribbean

Author: Margarite Fernández Olmos
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814728251
Format: PDF, ePub
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CreolizationOCothe coming together of diverse beliefs and practices to form new beliefs and practicesOCois one of the most significant phenomena in Caribbean religious history. Brought together in the crucible of the sugar plantation, Caribbean peoples drew on the variants of Christianity brought by European colonizers, as well as on African religious and healing traditions and the remnants of Amerindian practices, to fashion new systems of belief. Creole Religions of the Caribbean offers a comprehensive introduction to the syncretic religions that have developed in the region. From Vodou, Santer a, Regla de Palo, the Abakui Secret Society, and Obeah to Quimbois and Espiritismo, the volume traces the historicalOCocultural origins of the major Creole religions, as well as the newer traditions such as Pocomania and Rastafarianism. This second edition updates the scholarship on the religions themselves and also expands the regional considerations of the Diaspora to the U. S. Latino community who are influenced by Creole spiritual practices. Fernindez Olmos and ParavisiniOCoGebert also take into account the increased significance of material cultureOCoart, music, literatureOCoand healing practices influenced by Creole religions. In the Religion, Race, and Ethnicity series"