Religion in the Classroom

Author: Jennifer Hauver James
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135053537
Format: PDF, Docs
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Dilemmas surrounding the role for religious beliefs and experiences permeate the school lives of teachers and teacher educators. Inspired by the need for teachers and students to more fully understand such dilemmas, this book examines the relationship between religion and teaching/learning in a democratic society. Written for pre-service and in-service teachers, it will engage readers in thinking about how their own religious backgrounds affect their teaching; how students’ religious backgrounds influence their learning; how common experiences of school and classroom life privilege some religions at the expense of others; and how students can better understand diverse religious beliefs and interact with people from other backgrounds. The focus is specifically on classroom issues related to religious understandings and experiences of teachers and students, and the implications of those for developing democratic citizens. Grounded in both research and personal experience, each chapter provides thought-provoking evidence related to the role of religion in schools and society and asks readers to consider the consequences of varied ways of responding to the dilemmas posed.

Christian Privilege in U S Education

Author: Kevin J. Burke
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 131723247X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Using critical curriculum theory as its lens, this book explores the relationship between religion—specifically, Christianity and the Judeo-Christian ethos underlying it—and secular public education in the United States. Despite various 20th-century court decisions separating religion and education, the authors challenge that religion is in fact absent from public education, suggesting instead that it is in fact very much embedded in current public educational practices and discourses and in a variety of assumptions and perspectives underlying understandings of teaching, learning, and teacher preparation. The book reframes the discussion about religion and schooling, arguing that it remains in the language and metaphors of education, in the practices and routines of schooling, in conceptions of the "’child" and the "teacher" (and what happens between them in the spaces we call "learning," the "classroom," and "curriculum") as well as in assumptions about the role of schools emanating from such conceptions and in the current movement toward accountability, standardization, and testing. Christian Privilege in U.S. Education examines not whether Christianity has a place in public education but, rather, the very ways in which it is pervasive in a legally secular system of education even when religion is not a topic taught in school.

Teaching Politics in Secondary Education

Author: Wayne Journell
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438467710
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Uses data collected from multiple studies, starting with Obama’s historic 2008 candidacy through his reelection in 2012, to offer recommendations on best practices. Many social studies teachers report feeling apprehensive about discussing potentially volatile topics in the classroom, because they fear that administrators and parents might accuse them of attempting to indoctrinate their students. Wayne Journell tackles the controversial nature of teaching politics, addressing commonly raised concerns such as how to frame divisive political issues, whether teachers should disclose their personal political beliefs to students, and how to handle political topics that become intertwined with socially sensitive topics such as race, gender, and religion. Journell discusses how classrooms can become spaces for tolerant political discourse in an increasingly politically polarized American society. In order to explore this, Journell analyzes data that include studies of high school civics/government teachers during the 2008 and 2012 presidential elections and how they integrated television programs, technology, and social media into their teaching. The book also includes a three-year study of preservice middle and secondary social studies teachers’ political knowledge and a content analysis of CNN Student News. “Journell combines philosophical inquiry into the importance of political engagement with empirical work in classrooms to present a set of arguments that are rigorous and highly relevant to both scholars and practitioners who care about political teaching and learning." — Joel Westheimer, author of What Kind of Citizen? Educating Our Children for the Common Good

Democratic Dilemmas of Teaching Service Learning

Author: Christine M. Cress
Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC.
ISBN: 9781579226008
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A college student wants to lead a campaign to ban a young adult novel from his child’s elementary school as his service-learning project in a children’s literature course. Believing the book is offensive to religious sensibilities, he sees his campaign as a service to children and the community. Viewing such a ban as limiting freedom of speech and access to information, the student’s professor questions whether leading a ban qualifies as a service project. If the goal of service is to promote more vital democratic communities, what should the student do? What should the professor do? How do they untangle competing democratic values? How do they make a decision about action? This book addresses the teaching dilemmas, such as the above, that instructors and students encounter in service-learning courses. Recognizing that teaching, in general, and service-learning, in particular, are inherently political, this book faces up to the resulting predicaments that inevitably arise in the classroom. By framing them as a vital and productive part of the process of teaching and learning for political engagement, this book offers the reader new ways to think about and address seemingly intractable ideological issues. Faculty encounter many challenges when teaching service learning courses. These may arise from students’ resistance to the idea of serving; their lack of responsibility, wasting clients’ and community agencies’ time and money; the misalignment of community partner expectations with academic goals; or faculty uncertainty about when to guide students’ experiences and when direct intervention is necessary. In over twenty chapters of case studies, faculty scholars from disciplines as varied as computer science, engineering, English, history, and sociology take readers on their and their students’ intellectual journeys, sharing their messy, unpredictable and often inspiring accounts of democratic tensions and trials inherent in teaching service-learning. Using real incidents – and describing the resources and classroom activities they employ – they explore the democratic intersections of various political beliefs along with race/ethnicity, class, gender, ability, sexual orientation, and other lived differences and likenesses that students and faculty experience in their service-learning classroom and extended community. They share their struggles of how to communicate and interact across the divide of viewpoints and experiences within an egalitarian and inclusive environment all the while managing interpersonal tensions and conflicts among diverse people in complex, value-laden situations. The experienced contributors to this book offer pedagogical strategies for constructing service-learning courses, and non-prescriptive approaches to dilemmas for which there can be no definitive solutions.

Philosophy and Its Public Role

Author: William Aiken
Publisher: Andrews UK Limited
ISBN: 1845402677
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This collection of essays brings together moral, social and political philosophers from Britain, Canada, New Zealand and the United States who explore a wide range of issues under the three headings of Philosophy, Society and Culture; Ethics, Economics and Justice; and Rights, Law and Punishment. The topics discussed range from the public responsibility of intellectuals to the justice of military tribunals, and from posthumous reproduction to the death penalty.

Religious Education and the Challenge of Pluralism

Author: Adam B. Seligman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199399476
Format: PDF, Docs
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The essays in this volume offer a groundbreaking comparative analysis of religious education, and state policies towards religious education in seven different countries and in the European Union as a whole. They pose a crucial question: can religious education contribute to a shared public sphere and foster solidarity across different ethnic and religious communities? In many traditional societies and even in what are largely secular European societies, our place in creation, the meaning of good and evil, and the definition of the good life, virtue, and moral action, are all primarily addressed in religious terms. It is in fact hard to come to grips with these issues without recourse to religious language, traditions, and frames of reference. Yet, religious languages and identities divide as much as unite, and provide a site of contestation and strife as much as a sense of peace and belonging Not surprisingly, different countries approach religious education in dramatically different ways. Religious Education and the Challenge of Pluralism addresses a pervasive problem: how can religious education provide a framework of meaning, replete with its language of inclusion and community, without at the same time drawing borders and so excluding certain individuals and communities from its terms of collective membership and belonging? The authors offer in-depth analysis of such pluralistic countries as Bulgaria, Israel, Malaysia, and Turkey, as well as Cyprus - a country split along lines of ethno-religious difference. They also examine the connection between religious education and the terms of citizenship in the EU, France, and the USA, illuminating the challenges of educating our citizenry in an age of religious resurgence and global politics.

Connecting Policy and Practice

Author: Michael Kompf
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134232233
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Written by members of the International Study Association on Teachers and Teaching, the papers in this volume were presented at an international teaching conference on the issues of theory and practice. Using these contributions from experienced researchers, most of whom are practising teachers, this single volume is international in scope and context, demonstrating differences and similarities between and within countries. This detailed book is clearly split into five sections focusing on the following themes: * teacher education – professional identity, professional research, and quality of teacher education * teacher practice – basic values, ethics, and cultural scaffolding * higher education – academic motivation, discourse dissonance concerning intellectual property, self studies of teacher education practice * teacher development – the challenge to be the best teacher, the link between policy and practice, personal theory and practice in tertiary development * research and theory – reflective practice, shared democratic values, teachers as researchers.

For Goodness Sake

Author: Walter Feinberg
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415953782
Format: PDF, Docs
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While the fierce debate over religion in public schools receives ample media attention, we rarely consider the implications of religious schools on moral education and liberal democracy. In this groundbreaking work, Walter Feinberg opens up a critical new dialogue to offer a complete discussion of the important role religious schools play in the formation of a democratic citizenry. Feinberg, a leading philosopher of education, approaches the subject of religious education with a rare evenhandedness, drawing on examples from Christian, Jewish, and Muslim schools and exploring topics as disparate as sex education and creationism. For Goodness Sake provides a much-needed take on a controversial topic, demonstrating that the relationship between religion and schooling is not simply the exclusive concern of members of a given religious community, but a relevant and vital issue for everyone who cares about education.

School Leadership

Author: Gerald Grace
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780750704151
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book advances the new field of educational leadership--that of policy scholarship. It examines the ways in which concepts of educational leadership and management have evolved historically and culturally and reviews contemporary debates about the nature of school leadership. These debates involve cultural conservatives, New Right marketeers, democrats, community educators, feminists, and critical theorists. The policy-scholarship approach goes beyond the policy-science perspective. This new approach relates surface social phenomena to the deep structure of historical, cultural, political, ideological, and value issues; and it represents the view that a social-historical approach can illuminate the cultural and ideological struggles in which schooling is located. The book presents fieldwork accounts from a study of 88 headteachers in primary and secondary English schools. It describes how headteachers face new power relationships, new curriculum responsibilities, and management and marketing cultures that generate moral, ethical, and professional dilemmas. The book contains 12 chapters, 2 of which examine the unique situations of Catholic and women headteachers. (Contains 210 references.) (LMI)