Religion Race Rights

Author: Eve Darian-Smith
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1847317316
Format: PDF, ePub
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The book highlights the interconnections between three framing concepts in the development of modern western law: religion, race, and rights. The author challenges the assumption that law is an objective, rational and secular enterprise by showing that the rule of law is historically grounded and linked to the particularities of Christian morality, the forces of capitalism dependent upon exploitation of minorities, and specific conceptions of individualism that surfaced with the Reformation in the sixteenth century and rapidly developed in the Enlightenment in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Drawing upon landmark legal decisions and historical events, the book emphasises that justice is not blind because our concept of justice changes over time and is linked to economic power, social values, and moral sensibilities that are neither universal nor apolitical. Highlighting the historical interconnections between religion, race and rights aids our understanding of contemporary socio-legal issues. In the twenty-first century, the economic might of the USA and the west often leads to a myopic vision of law and a belief in its universal application. This ignores the cultural specificity of western legal concepts, and prevents us from appreciating that, analogous to previous colonial periods, in a global political economy Anglo-American law is not always transportable, transferable, or translatable across political landscapes and religious communities.

Race Religion and Civil Rights

Author: Stephanie Hinnershitz
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813575362
Format: PDF
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Histories of civil rights movements in America generally place little or no emphasis on the activism of Asian Americans. Yet, as this fascinating new study reveals, there is a long and distinctive legacy of civil rights activism among foreign and American-born Chinese, Japanese, and Filipino students, who formed crucial alliances based on their shared religious affiliations and experiences of discrimination. Stephanie Hinnershitz tells the story of the Asian American campus organizations that flourished on the West Coast from the 1900s through the 1960s. Using their faith to point out the hypocrisy of fellow American Protestants who supported segregation and discriminatory practices, the student activists in these groups also performed vital outreach to communities outside the university, from Californian farms to Alaskan canneries. Highlighting the unique multiethnic composition of these groups, Race, Religion, and Civil Rights explores how the students' interethnic activism weathered a variety of challenges, from the outbreak of war between Japan and China to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Drawing from a variety of archival sources to bring forth the authentic, passionate voices of the students, Race, Religion, and Civil Rights is a testament to the powerful ways they served to shape the social, political, and cultural direction of civil rights movements throughout the West Coast.

Race Rights and Reparations

Author: Eric K. Yamamoto
Publisher: Wolters Kluwer Law & Business
ISBN: 1454818905
Format: PDF, Docs
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Race, Rights and Reparation: Law and the Japanese American Internment is the first comprehensive course book that provides critical examination of the Asian-American legal experience, and the legal, social and ethical ramifications of the internment of Japanese- Americans during World War II and the successful reparations movement of the 1980s. Appropriate for a diverse set of law school and non-legal courses, it supplements carefully contextualized case law and social policies with dramatic oral histories, essays, commentary and photographs sure to stimulate class discussion. The Second Edition represents a substantial revision of the original course book. Several new chapters expressly link the Japanese-American internment cases and redress to the civil liberties and national security issues raised post-9/11, making Asian-American legal history even more relevant to significant contemporary controversies. Other key updates to first edition material include an even more comprehensive Overview Chapter and the addition of recent scholarly and judicial treatment of the World War II and coram nobis internment cases. Features: The only course book that covers Asian-American legal history and reparations. Accessible, multidisciplinary approach appeals to scholars, students and instructors of ethnic studies, history, sociology, as well as law and legal studies. Contextualizes internment and reparations to facilitate understanding of what happened and why, including an overview chapter with key details and timelines. Examines how social policy and politics both enabled and constrained legal decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court. Discusses "headline" topics, such as redress for governmental misconduct and the national security implications of the Japanese-American experience. Provocative oral histories, litigation documents, photographs, essays and commentary that enrich class discussion of judicial decisions. Flexible, modular organization accommodates the focus and interests of different courses and instructors. Authors' website provides updates and additional information. The Second Edition has been substantially revised with new chapters and updated material, including: An even more comprehensive overview chapter covering the text's larger themes and significant legal specifics. Completely new chapters replace old ones to expressly link the internment cases and Japanese-American redress to post-9/11 national security/civil liberties issues and to U.S. and International Reparations/Reconciliation.

Race Religion and Politics

Author: Stephanie Y. Mitchem
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1538107961
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This book examines race, religion, and politics in the United States, illuminating their intersections and what they reveal about power and privilege. Drawing on both historic and recent examples, Stephanie Mitchem discusses human rights throughout and concludes with a chapter looking toward possibilities for increased rights and justice for all.

Race Rights and the Law in the Supreme Court of Canada

Author: James W. St.G. Walker
Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
ISBN: 0889205663
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Four cases in which the legal issue was “race” — that of a Chinese restaurant owner who was fined for employing a white woman; a black man who was refused service in a bar; a Jew who wanted to buy a cottage but was prevented by the property owners’ association; and a Trinidadian of East Indian descent who was acceptable to the Canadian army but was rejected for immigration on grounds of “race” — drawn from the period between 1914 and 1955, are intimately examined to explore the role of the Supreme Court of Canada and the law in the racialization of Canadian society. With painstaking research into contemporary attitudes and practices, Walker demonstrates that Supreme Court Justices were expressing the prevailing “common sense” about “race” in their legal decisions. He shows that injustice on the grounds of “race” has been chronic in Canadian history, and that the law itself was once instrumental in creating these circumstances. The book concludes with a controversial discussion of current directions in Canadian law and their potential impact on Canada’s future as a multicultural society.

Race Rights and Recognition

Author: Dean J. Franco
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 080146448X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In Race, Rights, and Recognition, Dean J. Franco explores the work of recent Jewish American writers, many of whom have taken unpopular stances on social issues, distancing themselves from the politics and public practice of multiculturalism. While these writers explore the same themes of group-based rights and recognition that preoccupy Latino, African American, and Native American writers, they are generally suspicious of group identities and are more likely to adopt postmodern distancing techniques than to presume to speak for "their people." Ranging from Philip Roth's scandalous 1969 novel Portnoy's Complaint to Gary Shteyngart's Absurdistan in 2006, the literature Franco examines in this book is at once critical of and deeply invested in the problems of race and the rise of multicultural philosophies and policies in America. Franco argues that from the formative years of multiculturalism (1965-1975), Jewish writers probed the ethics and not just the politics of civil rights and cultural recognition; this perspective arose from a stance of keen awareness of the limits and possibilities of consensus-based civil and human rights. Contemporary Jewish writers are now responding to global problems of cultural conflict and pluralism and thinking through the challenges and responsibilities of cosmopolitanism. Indeed, if the United States is now correctly-if cautiously-identifying itself as a post-ethnic nation, it may be said that Jewish writing has been well ahead of the curve in imagining what a post-ethnic future might look like and in critiquing the social conventions of race and ethnicity.

Freedom s Coming

Author: Paul Harvey
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469606429
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In a sweeping analysis of religion in the post-Civil War and twentieth-century South, Freedom's Coming puts race and culture at the center, describing southern Protestant cultures as both priestly and prophetic: as southern formal theology sanctified dominant political and social hierarchies, evangelical belief and practice subtly undermined them. The seeds of subversion, Paul Harvey argues, were embedded in the passionate individualism, exuberant expressive forms, and profound faith of believers in the region. Harvey explains how black and white religious folk within and outside of mainstream religious groups formed a southern "evangelical counterculture" of Christian interracialism that challenged the theologically grounded racism pervasive among white southerners and ultimately helped to end Jim Crow in the South. Moving from the folk theology of segregation to the women who organized the Montgomery bus boycott, from the hymn-inspired freedom songs of the 1960s to the influence of black Pentecostal preachers on Elvis Presley, Harvey deploys cultural history in fresh and innovative ways and fills a decades-old need for a comprehensive history of Protestant religion and its relationship to the central question of race in the South for the postbellum and twentieth-century period.

God and Race in American Politics

Author: Mark A. Noll
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400829739
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Religion has been a powerful political force throughout American history. When race enters the mix the results have been some of our greatest triumphs as a nation--and some of our most shameful failures. In this important book, Mark Noll, one of the most influential historians of American religion writing today, traces the explosive political effects of the religious intermingling with race. Noll demonstrates how supporters and opponents of slavery and segregation drew equally on the Bible to justify the morality of their positions. He shows how a common evangelical heritage supported Jim Crow discrimination and contributed powerfully to the black theology of liberation preached by Martin Luther King Jr. In probing such connections, Noll takes readers from the 1830 slave revolt of Nat Turner through Reconstruction and the long Jim Crow era, from the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s to "values" voting in recent presidential elections. He argues that the greatest transformations in American political history, from the Civil War through the civil rights revolution and beyond, constitute an interconnected narrative in which opposing appeals to Biblical truth gave rise to often-contradictory religious and moral complexities. And he shows how this heritage remains alive today in controversies surrounding stem-cell research and abortion as well as civil rights reform. God and Race in American Politics is a panoramic history that reveals the profound role of religion in American political history and in American discourse on race and social justice.