Renewing Rhetoric s Relation to Composition

Author: Shane Borrowman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135263566
Format: PDF, Docs
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Renewing Rhetoric’s Relation to Composition comprehensively examines the development of rhetoric and composition, using the writings of Theresa Jarnagin Enos as points of departure for studies of broader trends. Chapters explore such topics as the historical relations of rhetoric and composition, their evolution within programs of study, and Enos’s research on gender. The volume presents the growing disjunction between rhetoric and composition and paints a compelling picture of the current state of both disciplines as well as their origins. This volume acknowledges the influential role that Theresa Enos has had in the writing and rhetoric disciplines. Her career provides benchmarks for plotting developments in rhetoric and composition, including the evolving relations between the two. This collection offers a tribute to her work and to the new directions in the discipline stemming from her research. With an all-star line-up of contributors, it also represents the state of the art in rhetoric and composition scholarship, and it will serve current and future scholars in both disciplines.

Dialectical Rhetoric

Author: Bruce McComiskey
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
ISBN: 1457195372
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In Dialectical Rhetoric, Bruce McComiskey argues that the historical conflict between rhetoric and dialectic can be overcome in ways useful to both composition theory and the composition classroom. Historically, dialectic has taken two forms in relation to rhetoric. First, it has been the logical development of linear propositions leading to necessary conclusions, a one-dimensional form that was the counterpart of rhetorics in which philosophical, metaphysical, and scientific truths were conveyed with as little cognitive interference from language as possible. Second, dialectic has been the topical development of opposed arguments on controversial issues and the judgment of their relative strengths and weaknesses, usually in political and legal contexts, a two-dimensional form that was the counterpart of rhetorics in which verbal battles over competing probabilities in public institutions revealed distinct winners and losers. The discipline of writing studies is on the brink of developing a new relationship between dialectic and rhetoric, one in which dialectics and rhetorics mediate and negotiate different arguments and orientations that are engaged in any rhetorical situation. This new relationship consists of a three-dimensional hybrid art called “dialectical rhetoric,” whose method is based on five topoi: deconstruction, dialogue, identification, critique, and juxtaposition. Three-dimensional dialectical rhetorics function effectively in a wide variety of discursive contexts, including digital environments, since they can invoke contrasts in stagnant contexts and promote associations in chaotic contexts. Dialectical Rhetoric focuses more attention on three-dimensional rhetorics from the rhetoric and composition community.

After the Public Turn

Author: Frank Farmer
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
ISBN: 0874219140
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In After the Public Turn, author Frank Farmer argues that counterpublics and the people who make counterpublics—“citizen bricoleurs”—deserve a more prominent role in our scholarship and in our classrooms. Encouraging students to understand and consider resistant or oppositional discourse is a viable route toward mature participation as citizens in a democracy. Farmer examines two very different kinds of publics, cultural and disciplinary, and discusses two counterpublics within those broad categories: zine discourses and certain academic discourses. By juxtaposing these two significantly different kinds of publics, Farmer suggests that each discursive world can be seen, in its own distinct way, as a counterpublic, an oppositional social formation that has a stake in widening or altering public life as we know it. Drawing on major figures in rhetoric and cultural theory, Farmer builds his argument about composition teaching and its relation to the public sphere, leading to a more sophisticated understanding of public life and a deeper sense of what democratic citizenship means for our time.

Toward a Civil Discourse

Author: Sharon Crowley
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre
ISBN: 0822973006
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Toward a Civil Discourse examines how, in the current political climate, Americans find it difficult to discuss civic issues frankly and openly with one another. Because America is dominated by two powerful discourses--liberalism and Christian fundamentalism, each of which paints a very different picture of America and its citizens' responsibilities toward their country-there is little common ground, and hence Americans avoid disagreement for fear of giving offence. Sharon Crowley considers the ancient art of rhetoric as a solution to the problems of repetition and condemnation that pervade American public discourse. Crowley recalls the historic rhetorical concept of stasis--where advocates in a debate agree upon the point on which they disagree, thereby recognizing their opponent as a person with a viable position or belief. Most contemporary arguments do not reach stasis, and without it, Crowley states, a nonviolent resolution cannot occur. Toward a Civil Discourse investigates the cultural factors that lead to the formation of beliefs, and how beliefs can develop into densely articulated systems and political activism. Crowley asserts that rhetorical invention (which includes appeals to values and the passions) is superior in some cases to liberal argument (which often limits its appeals to empirical fact and reasoning) in mediating disagreements where participants are primarily motivated by a moral or passionate commitment to beliefs. Sharon Crowley examines numerous current issues and opposing views, and discusses the consequences to society when, more often than not, argumentative exchange does not occur. She underscores the urgency of developing a civil discourse, and through a review of historic rhetoric and its modern application, provides a foundation for such a discourse-whose ultimate goal, in the tradition of the ancients, is democratic discussion of civic issues.

The Humanist scholastic Debate in the Renaissance Reformation

Author: Erika Rummel
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780674422513
Format: PDF, ePub
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In the last half of the fifteenth century, the classic Platonic debate over the respective merits of rhetoric and philosophy was replayed in the debate between humanists and scholastics over philology and dialectic. The intense dispute between representatives of the two camps fueled many of the most important intellectual developments of the Renaissance and Reformation. Erika Rummel delves into the extensive primary sources of the times, bringing the issues and their continuing legacy to light and making a valuable contribution to our understanding of the intellectual climate of early modern Europe. Rummel demonstrates how the passionately fought issue of the period changed focus as humanists such as Lorenzo Valla and Desiderius Erasmus applied philological skills to Scripture. The controversy over form versus content entered a new phase, pitting humanists trained as philologists against scholastic theologians trained as dialecticians. Rummel shows us the framework for the debate still intact as the medium/message dichotomy, and traces its development into quarrels over qualification and entitlement in the academy, as theologians and humanists disputed the intellectual and territorial boundaries of their respective disciplines. Finally, in the first half of the sixteenth century we see the controversy entering the sphere of doctrinal dispute. The question of authority became centered not only on professional competence but also on the more explosive issues of faith and Christian teaching. This in-depth study will reclaim the attention of those who believe these debates were merely personal and episodic; Rummel's innovative research provides ample evidence that the polemics of the age arose from a fundamental conflict over methodology and the freedom to pursue research.

Writing a Successful Research Paper

Author: Stanley Chodorow
Publisher: Hackett Publishing
ISBN: 1603847480
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This brief, practical guide offers a clear and comprehensive strategy for conceptualizing, approaching, and executing the task of writing a research paper in the humanities and social sciences. In addition, it provides: a critical and process-oriented approach to the tasks of topic selection, formulation of the research question, thesis development, and argumentation. judiciously selected examples drawn from a broad range of disciplines. concise treatment of the aims, methods, and conventions of scholarly research, including the opportunities and pitfalls of Internet use. a wealth of conceptual and organizational tools, and more.

Composition Rhetoric

Author: Robert Connors
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre
ISBN: 0822971828
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Connors provides a history of composition and its pedagogical approaches to form, genre, and correctness. He shows where many of the today’s practices and assumptions about writing come from, and he translates what our techniques and theories of teaching have said over time about our attitudes toward students, language and life. Connors locates the beginning of a new rhetorical tradition in the mid-nineteenth century, and from there, he discusses the theoretical and pedagogical innovations of the last two centuries as the result of historical forces, social needs, and cultural shifts. This important book proves that American composition-rhetoric is a genuine, rhetorical tradition with its own evolving theria and praxis. As such it is an essential reference for all teachers of English and students of American education.