Rethinking Field Experiences in Preservice Teacher Preparation

Author: Etta R. Hollins
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317584295
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
The focus of this book is the centrality of clinical experiences in preparing teachers to work with students from diverse cultural, economic, and experiential backgrounds. Organized around three themes—learning teaching through the approximation and representation of practice, learning teaching situated in context, and assessing and improving teacher preparation—Rethinking Field Experiences in Preservice Teacher Preparation provides detailed descriptions of theoretically grounded, research-based practices in programs that prepare preservice teachers to contextualize teaching practices in ways that result in a positive impact on learning for traditionally underserved students. These practices serve current demands for teacher accountability for student learning outcomes and model good practice for engaging teacher educators in meaningful, productive dialogue and analysis geared to developing local programs characterized by coherence, continuity, and consistency.

Clinical Experiences in Teacher Preparation

Author: Kristien Zenkov
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351116681
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Responding to multiple scholarly, policy, and practical calls for a greater focus on clinical teacher preparation, this volume operates on the assumption that few experiences in future teachers’ training are more important than their field experiences. This text introduces the model of critical, project-based (CPB) clinical experiences, which provides teacher candidates with exemplary on-the-ground training, honors veteran teachers as school-based teacher educators, and offers university-based teacher educators new roles that ensure their practices and scholarship are explicitly relevant to all of schools’ constituents. Answering the call for relevant, high quality, clinically-based teacher education, this volume will offer scholarly and narrative examinations of examples of CPB clinical experiences that will be of interest to all involved in and impacted by educator preparation programs.

Teacher Quality and Teacher Education Quality

Author: Nicholas M. Michelli
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317364279
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Accreditation of teacher education programs is increasingly embraced internationally and is being modeled after the American experience, despite criticisms from some in the field of teacher education in the United States. This book examines the transformation of accreditation and the interest and perception of nations and regions choosing to use the model in their own culture, including the Middle East and Gulf Region, South America, and the United Kingdom. Its distinctive edge is the juxtaposition of three sectors: quality assurance/accreditation, teacher preparation, and global/international experiences. The authors address how the adoption of a universal requirement for accreditation embraces a particular view of what teacher quality means. The emphasis on the development of teacher preparation in concert with accreditation is of academic interest to scholars in the United States and abroad. The experiences and voices of teacher educators as international colleagues in a global climate of accountability brings a fresh perspective on shared challenges.

Innovation and Implementation in Rural Places

Author: R. Martin Reardon
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1641132159
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
This volume focuses on innovative school-university-community collaborations that are being implemented in rural places in the United States. A foundational belief that underpins the contributions to this volume is that rural communities contain within themselves the resources to promote and sustain vibrant educational endeavors. This belief has inspired a wealth of innovations that collectively offer a countervailing perspective to the view that global competitiveness is the preeminent goal of education, and that this goal is best served by “big education.” Since early last century, there has been a pervasive implicit, and sometimes explicit, assumption that rural places are bereft of the ability to educate children effectively. As repeatedly witnessed in this volume, in collaboration with universities, schools in rural places and the communities that both sustain and rely on them can appropriately configure the educational environment to optimally nurture the intellectual growth of children. The chapters in this volume are grouped into three parts that explore, in turn, the design features of innovative school-universitycommunity collaborations, some novel approaches to such collaborations, and the contours of parental and community involvement in such collaborations. Chapters discuss both larger scale collaborations that involve many school districts across wide -spread regions, and smaller scale collaborations that involve intensive engagements among the educators and members of smaller communities, and offer theoretical insights into the collaborative process itself. As mentioned above, two narrative threads run through the chapters: that effective collaborations address goals and aspirations expressed by those who are privileged to live in rural America, and that effective collaborations are oriented to building on the strengths inherent in the social fabric of those rural communities.

Culture in School Learning

Author: Etta R. Hollins
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317802071
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Challenging educators to better understand themselves and their students, this text presents a powerful process for developing a teaching perspective that embraces the centrality of culture in school learning. The six-part process covers examining culture, personalizing culture, inquiring about students' cultures and communities, applying knowledge about culture to teaching, formulating theory or a conceptual framework linking culture and school learning, and transforming professional practice to better meet the needs of students from different cultural and experiential backgrounds. All aspects of the process are interrelated and interdependent. Two basic procedures employed in this process are presented: constructing an operational definition of culture that reveals its deep meaning in cognition and learning, and applying the reflective-interpretive-inquiry (RIQ) approach to making linkages between students' cultural and experiential backgrounds and classroom instruction. Pedagogical features in each chapter include Focus Questions; Chapter Summaries; Suggested Learning Experiences, Critical Reading lists. A Companion Website, new for the Third Edition (www.routledge.com/cw/Hollins), provides additional student resources.

Studying Teacher Education

Author: Marilyn Cochran-Smith
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135184402
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
This volume reports the work of the American Educational Research Association's Panel on Research and Teacher Education.It offers a synthesis of research on teacher education policies and practices in the US and an agenda for future research.

Learning to Teach in Urban Schools

Author: Etta R. Hollins
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136715541
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
This book is about the transition from teacher preparation to teaching practice in urban school settings. It provides a clear presentation of the challenges, resources, and opportunities for learning to teach in urban schools; examples of the experiences, perceptions, and practices of teachers who are effective in urban schools and those who are not; a detailed account of the journey of a team of teachers who transformed their practice to improve learning in a low performing urban school; an approach that can be used by novice teachers in joining a teacher community and making the transition from preparation to practice; and perspective on leadership that can be used to create a context for transforming teacher professional development in an urban school district. Learning to Teach in Urban Schools offers rare insight into how teachers can transform their own practice and in the process, transform the culture of low performing urban schools.

Preparing Teachers

Author: Committee on the Study of Teacher Preparation Programs in the United States
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309128056
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Teachers make a difference. The success of any plan for improving educational outcomes depends on the teachers who carry it out and thus on the abilities of those attracted to the field and their preparation. Yet there are many questions about how teachers are being prepared and how they ought to be prepared. Yet, teacher preparation is often treated as an afterthought in discussions of improving the public education system. Preparing Teachers addresses the issue of teacher preparation with specific attention to reading, mathematics, and science. The book evaluates the characteristics of the candidates who enter teacher preparation programs, the sorts of instruction and experiences teacher candidates receive in preparation programs, and the extent that the required instruction and experiences are consistent with converging scientific evidence. Preparing Teachers also identifies a need for a data collection model to provide valid and reliable information about the content knowledge, pedagogical competence, and effectiveness of graduates from the various kinds of teacher preparation programs. Federal and state policy makers need reliable, outcomes-based information to make sound decisions, and teacher educators need to know how best to contribute to the development of effective teachers. Clearer understanding of the content and character of effective teacher preparation is critical to improving it and to ensuring that the same critiques and questions are not being repeated 10 years from now.

Studying Science Teacher Identity

Author: Lucy Avraamidou
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9463005285
Format: PDF
Download Now
The overarching goal of this book volume is to illuminate how research on science teacher identity has deepened and complicated our understanding of the role of identity in examining teacher learning and development. The collective chapters, both theoretical and empirical, present an array of conceptual underpinnings that have been used to frame science teacher identity, document the various methodological approaches that researchers have implemented in order to study science teacher identity within various contexts, and offer empirical evidence about science teacher identity development. The findings of the studies presented in this volume support the argument that teacher identity is a dynamic, multidimensional and comprehensive construct, which provides a powerful lens for studying science teacher learning and development for various reasons. First, it pushes our boundaries by extending our definitions of science teacher learning and development as it proposes new ways of conceptualizing the processes of becoming a science teacher. Second, it emphasizes the role of the context on science teacher learning and development and pays attention to the experiences that teachers have as members of various communities. Third, it allows us to examine the impact of various sub-identities, personal histories, emotions, and social markers, such as ethnicity, race, and class, on science teachers’ identity development. The book aims at making a unique and deeply critical contribution to notions around science teacher identity by proposing fresh theoretical perspectives, providing empirical evidence about identity development, offering a set of implications for science teacher preparation, and recommending directions for future research.