Rethinking Social Exclusion

Author: Simon Winlow
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1446292932
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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‘…classic Winlow and Hall – bleak, brilliant and unmatched in the art of rethinking crucial social issues. Enlightening, and rather scary.’ - Professor Beverley Skeggs, Goldsmiths, University of London ‘This superb book inhabits a unique theoretical space and demonstrates Winlow and Hall at their brilliant best as theorists of contemporary social exclusion.’ - Professor John Armitage, University of Southampton ‘…making exemplary use of critical theory, this book represents a powerful, rallying response to Benjamin's notion that "It is only for the sake of those without a hope that hope is given to us"’. - Dr Paul A. Taylor, author of Zizek and the Media ‘… an intellectual tour de force. Winlow and Hall, outriders of a radically different political economy for our era, have done it again. Their latest book is the critical criminology book of the decade, and the best account of capitalism since the 2008 crash… A devastating critical analysis of the effects of neo-liberalism.’ - Professor Steve Redhead, Charles Sturt University 'I had long regarded "social exclusion" to be another zombie-concept that retained no analytic or political purchase whatsoever. This book has changed my mind.' - Professor Roger Burrows, Goldsmiths, University of London In their quest to rethink the study of ‘social exclusion’, Winlow and Hall offer a startling analysis of social disintegration and the retreat into subjectivity. They claim that the reality of social exclusion is not simply displayed in ghettos and sink estates. It can also be discerned in exclusive gated housing developments, in the non-places of the shopping mall, in the deadening reality of low-level service work – and in the depressing uniformity of our political parties. Simon Winlow is Professor of Criminology at the Social Futures Institute, Teesside University. Steve Hall is Professor of Criminology at the Social Futures Institute, Teesside University.

Rethinking Social Exclusion

Author: Simon Winlow
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1446296024
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
‘…classic Winlow and Hall – bleak, brilliant and unmatched in the art of rethinking crucial social issues. Enlightening, and rather scary.’ - Professor Beverley Skeggs, Goldsmiths, University of London ‘This superb book inhabits a unique theoretical space and demonstrates Winlow and Hall at their brilliant best as theorists of contemporary social exclusion.’ - Professor John Armitage, University of Southampton ‘…making exemplary use of critical theory, this book represents a powerful, rallying response to Benjamin's notion that "It is only for the sake of those without a hope that hope is given to us"’. - Dr Paul A. Taylor, author of Zizek and the Media ‘… an intellectual tour de force. Winlow and Hall, outriders of a radically different political economy for our era, have done it again. Their latest book is the critical criminology book of the decade, and the best account of capitalism since the 2008 crash… A devastating critical analysis of the effects of neo-liberalism.’ - Professor Steve Redhead, Charles Sturt University 'I had long regarded "social exclusion" to be another zombie-concept that retained no analytic or political purchase whatsoever. This book has changed my mind.' - Professor Roger Burrows, Goldsmiths, University of London In their quest to rethink the study of ‘social exclusion’, Winlow and Hall offer a startling analysis of social disintegration and the retreat into subjectivity. They claim that the reality of social exclusion is not simply displayed in ghettos and sink estates. It can also be discerned in exclusive gated housing developments, in the non-places of the shopping mall, in the deadening reality of low-level service work – and in the depressing uniformity of our political parties. Simon Winlow is Professor of Criminology at the Social Futures Institute, Teesside University. Steve Hall is Professor of Criminology at the Social Futures Institute, Teesside University.

Rethinking the Social through Durkheim Marx Weber and Whitehead

Author: Michael Halewood
Publisher: Anthem Press
ISBN: 1783083697
Format: PDF
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According to some social theorists, we are ‘at the end of the social’. This book argues that such pronouncements may be premature, as we need to reengage with what sociologists have previously meant by ‘the social’. ‘Rethinking the Social’ is the first book to systematically analyse the different concepts of the social developed by Durkheim, Marx and Weber. It examines how the concept of the social became unproblematic for twentieth-century writers and suggests that debates surrounding this concept remain very much alive. Building on A. N. Whitehead’s work, Halewood develops a novel ‘philosophy of the social’.

Dying to be Men

Author: Gary Thomas Barker
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415337755
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Based on field research and interviews in the USA and Brazil, 'Dying to be Men' explores how manhood or male identity is shaped in poor urban settings, how it is that some young men resist the prevailing norms, what the implications are for social policy and what are the most important forms of intervention.

Childhood Poverty and Social Exclusion

Author: Tess Ridge
Publisher: Policy Press
ISBN: 1861343620
Format: PDF
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Without a deeper understanding of poverty as a lived experience in childhood, policies targeted at eradicating child poverty may fail. This book presents an opportunity to understand the issues and concerns that low-income children themselves identify as important.

Technology and Social Inclusion

Author: Mark Warschauer
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262731737
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Going beyond the oversimplified notion of a "digital divide" to analyze the relationship between access to information and communication technologies and social inclusion.

Social Justice and Social Policy in Scotland

Author: Gerry Mooney
Publisher: Policy Press
ISBN: 1847427022
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A critical engagement with the state of social policy a decade after Scotland's devolution in the UK, this book focuses on the successive Scottish administration's key vision of greater social justice as it pertains to the analysis of its social policy. Arguing that such analysis must be located in wider debates about social justice, it shows how the devolution process has affected the making, implementation, and impact of Scotland's social programs. Looking at a range of topics, including income inequality, work and welfare, criminal justice, housing, education, and health, the contributors to this volume offer a comprehensive look at the ways administrative vision has been translated—or not—into effective policy.

Rethinking Children s Citizenship

Author: Tom Cockburn
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 0230271871
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Citizenship is a phenomenon that encompasses the relationships between the state and individuals, rights and responsibilities and identity and nationhood. Yet the relationship between citizenship and childhood has gone relatively unexplored. This book examines this relationship by situating it within the historical development of modern forms of citizenship that have formed contemporary Western notions of childhood and citizenship. The book also engages with recent political and social theory to rethink our current view of citizenship and develops an understanding that emphasises social interdependence and calls for a concomitant re-evaluation of our public spaces that facilitates the recognition of children as participating agents within society. The book will be of interest to those working across a wide number of disciplines, including politics, sociology, education, health, social work, childhood studies, youth studies, law and social policy, together with policy-makers, teachers and practitioners in allied areas.

Rethinking Development in Latin America

Author: Charles H. Wood
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 9780271025155
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Understanding development in Latin America today requires both an awareness of the major political and economic changes that have produced a new agenda for social policy in the region and an appreciation of the need to devise better conceptual and methodological tools for analyzing the social impact of these changes. Using as a reference point the issues and theories that dominated social science research on Latin America in the period 1960&–80, this volume contributes to &“rethinking development&” by examining the historical events that accounted for the erosion or demise of once-dominant paradigms and by assessing the new directions of research that have emerged in their place. Following the editors&’ overview of the new conceptual and social agendas in their Introduction, the book proceeds with a review of previous broad conceptual approaches by Alejandro Portes, who emphasizes by contrast the advantages of newer &“middle-range&” theories. Subsequent chapters focus on changes in different arenas and the concepts and methods used to interpret them: &“Globalization, Neoliberalism, and Social Policy&”; &“Citizenship, Politics, and the State&”; &“Work, Families, and Reproduction&”; and &“Urban Settlements, Marginality, and Social Exclusion.&” Contributors, besides the editors, are Marina Ariza and Orlandina de Oliveira, Diane Davis, Vilmar Faria, Joe Foweraker, Elizabeth Jelin, Alejandro Portes, Joe Potter and Rudolfo Tuir&án, Juan Pablo P&érez S&áinz, Osvaldo Sunkel, and Peter Ward.

Injustice revised Edition

Author: Daniel Dorling
Publisher: Policy Press
ISBN: 1447320751
Format: PDF, ePub
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In the five years since the first edition of Danny Dorling's Injustice was published, poverty, hunger, and destitution have increased dramatically in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. Globally, the richest 1% have never held a greater share of world wealth, while the share held by most of the other 99% has collapsed, with more and more people in debt, especially the young. And as long as we tolerate the injustices that underpin this inequality, it will persist and, terrifyingly, continue to grow. This fully rewritten and updated edition of Dorling's approachable yet authoritative, hard-hitting, and uncompromising book revisits his claim that the five social evils identified by Beveridge at the dawn of the British welfare state (ignorance, want, idleness, squalor, and disease) are being replaced by five new tenets of injustice: elitism is efficient; exclusion is necessary; prejudice is natural; greed is good; and despair is inevitable. By showing these beliefs are unfounded, Dorling offers hope of a more equal society even in these most remarkable and dangerous times. With every year that passes, it is more evident that Dorling's call to action is essential reading for anyone concerned with social justice.